The Times/1922/Obituary/Judge Fossett Lock


Judge Fossett Lock

His Honour Judge Benjamin Fossett Lock, who died yesterday, at Bridlington, in his seventy-fifth year, was a link with the old Positivist Society, of which he was honorary secretary from 1880 to 1886.

The son of Henry Lock, solicitor, of Dorchester, he was a younger brother of the Rev. Walter Lock, Lady Margaret Professor at Oxford, and formerly Warden of Keble, and was born on December 13, 1847. He went to Dorchester Grammar School, and was elected a King's scholar at Eton, and in due course a scholar of King's Cambridge, where he took his degree in 1871, He was called to the Bar by Lincoln's Inn in 1873, and joined the Chancery Bar, the Western Circuit, and the Dorset Sessions, He also practised as an equity draftsman and conveyancer. In 1913 he was appointed County Court Judge of Circuit 16 (East Riding and parts of North and West Ridings of Yorkshire).

Judge Lock was a man of varied interests. He was the author of the article on Professor Maitland in the "Dictionary of National Biography," and he collaborated in two issues of "The Annual Practice," 1910-11. In the work of the Selden Society he took a great interest, and was honorary secretary for eighteen years and a member of the council till his death. He had held a commission in the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, and was a member of the Admiralty Volunteer Committee. For twenty-six years he was chairman of committee of the Social and Political Education League, and was till his death chairman of the Central Legal Aid Society, vice-president of the Dorset Men in London, and member of the council of the Yorkshire Archæological Society. He wrote various articles and pamphlets on the defence of poor prisoners and legal aid for the poor. Mrs. Lock, who was a daughter of the Rev. J. P. Hammond, died in 1920, leaving a son and a daughter.

The funeral will be at Bridlington Priory Church in Tuesday.


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