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THE


EDUCATION OF THE FARMER,


VIEWED IN CONNECTION WITH THAT OF THE


MIDDLE CLASSES IN GENERAL:


ITS OBJECTS, PRINCIPLES, AND COST.





By T. D. ACLAND, Esq.,

LATE FELLOW OF ALL SOULS COLLEGE, OXFORD.



LONDON:
PUBLISHED BY J. RIDGWAY, 169, PICCADILLY.

OXFORD: PARKER & SON. CAMBRIDGE: MACMILLAN.
EXETER: W. H. ROBERTS.

1857.



REPRINTED FROM
THE JOURNAL OF THE BATH AND WEST OF ENGLAND SOCIETY
FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURE, ARTS,
MANUFACTURES, AND COMMERCE.





LONDON: PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, STAMFORD STREET,
AND CHARING CROSS.





I inscribe your name on these few pages, not that I wish to make you in any sense responsible for their contents, nor that in writing of the education of others I can venture to speak publicly of the parental training your own children have received.

But at this time, when the public response to plans in which I have taken part far exceeds my expectation, I cannot but give some utterance to a feeling common to all your sons (especially cherished by him who, since these lines were first penned, has been called from the midst of his unceasing work for others to the rest he longed for), that, if we are ever permitted to help on what is useful and good, we owe it to you. For we inherit friendships and sympathies won by your hearty love of worth and excellence in whatever rank they are to be found, and by your instinctive sense of what is due from man to man.

In acting with others earnestly engaged in promoting the good of their fellow countrymen, whether physical, intellectual, or moral, your sons can but follow the path marked out by their father nearly half a century ago.

T. D. A., Jun.



CONTENTS.
 
 
Page
Introduction 1
The Education of the Farmer not to be separated from Middle-Class Education generally 6
Middle-Class Education must prepare—
1, for business, not for college 7
2, for dealing with things rather than with men 8
Education of the Child:—
Mother's training 10
Servants 13
Education of the Boy:—
School and schoolfellows 14
Useful education illustrated 15
i. What is really useful for business:—
Language 20
Calculation 20
Natural philosophy 21
Chemistry and physical science 22
ii. What is useful to educate a Man : —
Literature, late Professor Hussey 24
Awakens mental power 25
Coleridge's schoolmaster 27
Cyril Jackson 28
Trains moral feeling 28
The study of language 32
Should farmers learn Latin? 34
Opinions of Mr. Penrose 36
Dr. Boole 36
Mr. Thring 37
Dr. Kennedy 38
Geography and history 38
Drawing and music 40
The expense of education 41
For small farmers 44
For the higher yeomanry 45
Middle-class colleges 45
APPENDIX.
Extracts from Dr. Arnold on Middle-Class Schools 50
Letter from Dr. Voelcker on Teaching Chemistry at School 52
Eton Questions on Chemistry. By Mr. Pepper 53
Rev. Stephen Hawtrey on Music as a means of General Education 55
List of Books 57

This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.