United States v. O'Brien/Concurrence Harlan

Court Documents
Case Syllabus
Opinion of the Court
Concurring Opinion
Harlan
Dissenting Opinion
Douglas


MR. JUSTICE HARLAN, concurring.

The crux of the Court's opinion, which I join, is, of course, its general statement, ante at 377 that:

a government regulation is sufficiently justified if it is within the constitutional power of the Government; if it furthers an important or substantial governmental interest; if the governmental interest is unrelated to the suppression of free expression, and if the incidental restriction on alleged First Amendment freedoms is no greater than is essential to the furtherance of that interest.

I wish to make explicit my understanding that this passage does not foreclose consideration of First Amendment claims in those rare instances when an "incidental" restriction upon expression, imposed by a regulation which furthers an "important or substantial" governmental interest and satisfies the Court's other criteria, in practice has the effect of entirely preventing a "speaker" [p389] from reaching a significant audience with whom he could not otherwise lawfully communicate. This is not such a case, since O'Brien manifestly could have conveyed his message in many ways other than by burning his draft card.