Florida Lime & Avocado Growers, Inc. v. Paul

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Florida Lime & Avocado Growers, Inc. v. Paul
by the Supreme Court of the United States
Syllabus

In Florida Lime & Avocado Growers, Inc. v. Paul, 373 U.S. 132 (1963), the Supreme Court of the United States declined to invalidate a Californian law that imposed minimum maturity standards on avocados sold in the state, including those imported from other states. The law prohibited the retail sale of avocados that did not contain at least 8% oil by weight. Florida, a major avocado producer, employed, for wholesale marketing purposes, a federal standard unrelated to oil content. Many Florida avocados that were marketable at home failed to meet the Californian standard, so Florida avocado growers brought this suit, arguing that the Californian law (1) was preempted by federal law, (2) violated equal protection, and (3) interfered with their right to engage in interstate commerce. Excerpted from Florida Lime & Avocado Growers, Inc. v. Paul on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Court Documents

United States Supreme Court

373 U.S. 132

Florida Lime & Avocado Growers, Inc.  v.  Paul

 Argued: Jan. 8, 1963. --- Decided: May 13, 1963

See 374 U.S. 858, 83 S.Ct. 1861.

[Syllabus from pages 132-133 intentionally omitted]

Isaac E. Ferguson, Van Nuys, Cal., for appellants in No. 45 and for appellees in No. 49.

John Fourt, Sacramento, Cal., for appellees in No. 45 and for appellants in No. 49.

Mr. Justice BRENNAN delivered the opinion of the Court.

NotesEdit

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).