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A SET OF ROGUES


     TO WIT

CHRISTOPHER SUTTON
JOHN DAWSON
The Señor Don SANCHEZ
DEL CASTILLO de CASTELAÑA
and MOLL DAWSON


THEIR WICKED CONSPIRACY

AND A TRUE ACCOUNT OF THEIR
TRAVELS AND ADVENTURES


TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER SURPRISING THINGS, NOW
DISCLOSED FOR THE FIRST TIME, AS THE FAITHFUL
CONFESSION OF CHRISTOPHER SUTTON


BY

FRANK BARRETT

Author of "The Admirable Lady Biddy Fane,"
"The Great Hesper," etc.


New York
MACMILLAN AND CO.
AND LONDON
1895

All rights reserved



Copyright, 1895,
BY MACMILLAN AND CO.



Norwood Press:
J. S. Cushing & Co.—Berwick & Smith.
Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
page
Of my companions and our adversities, and in particular from our getting into the stocks at Tottenham Cross to our being robbed at Edmonton 1

CHAPTER II.
Of our first acquaintance with the Señor Don Sanchez del Castillo de Castelaña, and his brave entertaining of us 10

CHAPTER III.
Of that design which Don Sanchez opened to us at the Bell 18

CHAPTER IV.
Of the several parts that we are appointed to play 27

CHAPTER V.
Don Sanchez puts us in the way of robbing with an easy conscience 34

CHAPTER VI.
Moll is cast to play the part of a fine lady; doubtful promise for this undertaking 46

CHAPTER VII.
Of our journey through France to a very horrid pass in the Pyraneans 52

CHAPTER VIII.
How we were entertained in the mountains, and stand in a fair way to have our throats cut 61

CHAPTER IX.
Of the manner in which we escaped pretty fairly out of the hands of Señor Don Lopez and his brigands 70

CHAPTER X.
Of our merry journeying to Alicante 79

CHAPTER XI.
Of our first coming to Elche and the strangeness of that city 88

CHAPTER XII.
How Don Sanchez very honestly offers to free us of our bargain if we will; but we will not 96

CHAPTER XIII.
A brief summary of those twelve months we spent at Elche 104

CHAPTER XIV.
Of our coming to London (with incidents by the way), and of the great address whereby Moll confounds Simon, the steward 114

CHAPTER XV.
Lay our hands on six hundred pounds and quarter ourselves in Hurst Court, but stand in a fair way to be undone by Dawson, his folly 127

CHAPTER XVI.
Prosper as well as any thieves may; but Dawson greatly tormented 135

CHAPTER XVII.
How Dawson for Moll's good parts company with us, and goes away a lonely man 144

CHAPTER XVIII.
Of our getting a painter into the Court, with whom our Moll falls straightway in love 152

CHAPTER XIX.
Of the business appointed to the painter, and how he set about the same 161

CHAPTER XX.
Of Moll's ill humour and what befel thereby 170

CHAPTER XXI.
Of the strange things told us by the wise woman 180

CHAPTER XXII.
How Moll and Mr. Godwin come together and declare their hearts' passion, and how I carry these tidings to Dawson 185

CHAPTER XXIII.
Don Sanchez proposes a very artful way to make Mr. Godwin a party to our knavery, etc. 197

CHAPTER XXIV.
I overcome Moll's honest compunctions, lay hold of three thousand pounds more, and do otherwise play the part of rascal to perfection 203

CHAPTER XXV.
A table of various accidents 212

CHAPTER XXVI.
How Moll Dawson was married to Mr. Richard Godwin; brief account of attendant circumstances 220

CHAPTER XXVII.
Of the great change in Moll, and the likely explanation thereof 233

CHAPTER XXVIII.
Moll plays us a mad prank for the last time in her life 237

CHAPTER XXIX.
Of the subtile means whereby Simon leads Mr. Godwin to doubt his wife 247

CHAPTER XXX.
How we are discovered and utterly undone 254

CHAPTER XXXI.
Moll's conscience is quickened by grief and humiliation beyond the ordinary 259

CHAPTER XXXII.
How we fought a most bloody battle with Simon, the constable, and others 265

CHAPTER XXXIII.
We take Moll to Greenwich; but no great happiness for her there 271

CHAPTER XXXIV.
All agree to go out to Spain again in search of our old jollity 281

CHAPTER XXXV.
How we lost our poor Moll, and our long search for her 288

CHAPTER XXXVI.
We learn what hath become of Moll; and how she nobly atoned for our sins 300

CHAPTER XXXVII.
Don Sanchez again proves himself the most mannerly rascal in the world 308

CHAPTER XXXVIII.
How we hear Moll's sweet voice through the walls of her prison, and speak two words with her, though almost to our undoing 313

CHAPTER XXXIX.
Of our bargaining with a Moorish seaman; and of an English slave 322

CHAPTER XL.
Of our escape from Barbary, of the pursuit and horrid, fearful slaughter that followed, together with other moving circumstances 330

CHAPTER XLI.
How Dawson counts himself an unlucky man who were best dead; and so he quits us, and I, the reader 340


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1924.


The author died in 1926, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.