Archaeologia/Volume 13/A complete list of the Royal Navy of England in 1599

V. A complete List of the Royal Navy of England in 1599.Extracted from an Original Manuscript in the Possession of Dr. Leith of Greenwich, exhibited to the Society of Antiquaries by William Latham, Esq. F.S.A.

Read May 5, 1796.

A complete List of the Royal Navy of England in the year together with the number of Brass and Cast-Iron Ordnance, of the different species then in use, viz. Cannon, Demi-Cannon, Culverins, Demi-Culverins, Sakers, Mynions, Falcons, Falconetts, Portpecehalls, Portpece-Chambers, Fowler-Halls, Fowler-Chambers, and Curtalls, on board of each, or, as it is expressed in the title-page, "At the Shippes or Navy Royall lying in harborowe as well in the Roade by Chatham in the Ryver of Medwey-waters, as also upon present occasyons by Gravesend in the Ryver of Thames. And lastly, at her Highenes Shippes then serving abroade on the Seas." Taken by the Queen's Commission, dated at Westminster 3d of March, in the 37th Year of her Reign, and directed to William Lord Burleigh, Lord High Treasurer of England, Charles Lord Howard, Lord High Admiral of England, Henry Lord of Hunsdon, &c. &c. and subsequent Orders of the above Commissioners, the last whereof is dated April 6, 1599.

"1. THE Achatis, of five brass falcons, six demi-culverins of cast-iron, and two mynions of the same."

It appears from Sir William Monfon's Naval Traces that the falcon was a species of ordnance of two inches and a half bore, weight of the shot two pounds; that the demi-culverin was another species of four inches bore, weight of the shot nine pounds and a half. And the mynion, another of three inches and a half bore, weight of the shot four pounds.

"2. The Adventure, of four culverins of brass, eleven demi-culverins of the same, and five, sakers of the same, with two brass fowler-halls and four brass fowler-chambers." The above authority states that the culverin was a species of ordnance of five inches and a half bore, weight of the shot seventeen pounds and a half. The fowler is not described by Monson, but is mentioned by Mr. Lodge in his Illustrations of British History, Vol. i. p. 4. in an account of "Orden~nce and Artilery." Temp. Hen. 8. as follows:

"Fowlers with their apparell, with two chambers."

The sacar, according to Monson, was a piece of ordnance of three inches and a half bore, weight of shot five pounds and a half.

"3. The Advantage, of six demi-culverins, eight sakers and four mynions, all of cast-iron.

"4. The Amity of Harwich[1], a drumler, of four demi-culverins and two sakers of cast-iron.

"5. The St. Andrew, of six culverins, seven demi-culverins, three sakers, and one mynion; three fowler-halls, seven fowler-chambers, and two curtalls, all of brass; with two culverins, fourteen demi- culverins, four sakers, and one mynion, all of cast-iron."

Curtalls are not described by Sir William Monson, but are mentioned in Lodge's Illustrations of Britim History ut supra

[2]"Curtowes of metall, with all their apparell. I."

"6. The Antelope, of four culverins, five demi-culverins, four sakers, one falcon, two portpeece-halls[3], four portpeece chambers, two fowler-halls, four fowler-chambers, all of brass; with eight demi-culverims and four sakers of cast-iron."

Portpieces are not described by Sir William Monson, but are mentioned in Mr. Topham's Historical Description of a Second Antient Picture in Windsor Castle. Archaeologia, Vol. VI. p. 190.

"Porte pieces of Irone" with " Shotte for porte pieces"

Also Ibid. p. 316, as Furniture of the Harry Grace de Dieu.

For the meaning of the word "Chambers[4] used here, see Mr. King's Account of an Old Piece of Ordnance. Archaeol. Vol. V. p. 150. "Being composed of two parts, thirty or forty chambers may be always at hand, ready charged, and with the greatest facility adapted to the place made for receiving them.

7. The Advice, of four sakers, two mynions, and three falcons, all of brass.

8. The Arke, of four cannon, four demi-cannon, twelve culverins, twelve demi-culverinss, six sakers, four port piece-halls, seven port-piece chambers, two fowler-halls, and four fowler chambers, all of brass."

The Ark appears to have been a First Rate. Sir William Monson, ut supra, describes the cannon to have been of eight inches bore, weight of shot sixty pounds, and the demi-cannon of six inches and three quarters bore, weight of shot thirty-three pounds and a half.

9. The Annswere, of two fowler-halls and four fowler-chambers of brass, with five demi-culverins, eight sakers, and two mynions, of cast-iron.

10. The Ayde, of one saker, two mynions, four falcons, of brass; with eight demi-culverins, one saker, and two mynions, of cast-iron.

11. The Beare, of two sakers, of cast-iron.

12. The White Beare, of three cannon, six demi-cannon, seven culverins, seven demi-culverins, two portpeece halls, and seven fowler halls, all of brass; with five demi-cannon, and three demi-culverins, all of cast-iron.

13. The Charles, of eight fakers, and two falcons, of brass; with two fowler halls, and four fowler chambers of the same.

"14. The Crane, of two demi-culverins, two sakers, two mynions, two fowler halls, and three fowler-chambers, all of brass; with four demi-culverins, five sakers, and four mynions, all of cast-iron.

"15. The Cygnett, of two falconetts of brass, and one falcon of cast- iron." Sir William Monson, ut supra, describes the falconett to have been a piece of ordnance of two inches bore, weight of the shot one pound and a half.

"16. The Due Repulse, of two cannon, three demi-cannon, thirteen culverins, fourteen demi-culverins, fix sakers, two port peece halls, four port peece chambers, two fowler halls, and four fowler chambers, all of brass.

"17. The Dreadnought, of two cannon, four culverins, eleven demi- culverins, ten sakers, two falcons, four fowler halls, and eight fowler chambers, all of brass.

"18. The Defyance, of fourteen culverins, fourteen demi-culverins, six sakers, two port-peece halls, four port-peece chambers, two fowler halls, and four fowler chambers, all of brass.

"19. The Dayfey, a drumler, of four sakers of cast-iron.

"20. The Elizabeth Jonas, of three cannon, two demi-cannon, eight culverins, four sakers, one mynion, two falcons, one port-peece hall, two port-peece chambers, five fowler halls, and ten fowler chambers, all of brass; with four demi-cannon, nine demi-culverins, and five sakers, of cast-iron.

"21. The Eliza Bonaventur, of two cannon, two demi-cannon, eleven culverins, fourteen demi-culverins, four sakers, two mynions, two port-peece halls, four port-peece chambers, two fowler halls, and four fowler chambers, all of brass.

"22. The Forefight, often demi-culverins, eight sakers, three mynions, two falcons, (and one Spanish) three fowler halls, and six fowler chambers, all of brass; with four demi-culverins of cast-iron.

"23 . The Guardland, of sixteen culverins, twelve demi-culverins, two sakers, two port-peece halls, four port-peece chambers, two fowler-halls, and three fowler chambers, all of brass; with two demi-culverins, and two sakers, of cast-iron.

"24. The Hoape, of two cannon, four demi-cannon, nine culverins, eleven demi-culverins, four sakers, four port-peece halls, eight port-peece chamfers, two fowler halls, and four fowler chambers, all of brass.

"25. The Lyon, of four demi-cannon, eight culverins, twelve demi-culverins, nine sakers, one falcon, eight fowler halls, and sixteen fowler chambers, all of brass; with two demi-culverins of cast-iron.

"26. The Marie Rose, of four demi-cannon, ten culverins, seven demi-culverins, four sakers, three port-peece halls, seven port-peece chambers, all of brass; with one culverin, and three demi-culverins of cast-iron.

"27. The Mere Honora, of four demi-cannon, fifteen culverins, sixteen demi-culverins, four sakers, and two fowler-halls, all of brass.

"28. The St. Mathew, of four cannon, four demi-cannon, sixteen culverins, eight demi-culverins, two sakers, three mynions, and two falcons, all of brass; with six demi-culverins, two sakers, and one mynion, of cast-iron.

"29. The Mercury, or Galley Mercury, of one culverin, one saker, and four fowler chambers, all of brass.

"30. The Marlin, of three falcons of brass, and four falcons of cast-iron.

"31. The Moone, of four sakers, four mynions, and one falcon, all of brass.

"32. The Nonpareille, of two cannon, three demi-cannon, seven culverins, eight demi-culverins, twelve sakers, four port-peece halls, eight port-peece chambers, four fowler halls, and eight fowler chambers, all of brass.

"33 The Quittance, of four demi-culverins, four sakers, two fowler halls, and four fowler chambers, all of brass; with two culverins, two demi-culverins, three sakers, and four mynions, all of cast-iron.

"34. The Rainbowe, of six demi-cannon, twelve culverins, seven demi-culverins, and one saker, all of brass.

"35. The Skoute, of four sakers and six falcons, all of brass.

"36. The Swift-fuer, of two cannon, five culverins, eight demi-culverins, five sakers, two falcons, four fowler halls, and eight fowler chambers, all of brass; with four demi-culverins, and three sakers, of cast-iron.

"37. The Spye of four sakers, two mynions, and three falcons, all of brass.

"38. The Swallowe, of two mynions, one falcon, two port-peece chambers, and three fowler chambers, all of brass.

"39. The Sonne, of one demi-culverin and four falcons, all of brass.

"40. The Triumphe, of four cannon, three demi-cannon, seventeen culverins, eight demi-culverins, six sakers, one port-peece hall, four port-peece chambers, five fowler-halls, and twenty fowler chambers, all of brass.

"41. The Tremontana, of twelve sakers, seven mynions, and two falcons, all of brass.

"42. The Teyger, of six demi-culverins, fourteen sakers, and two falcons, all of cast-iron.

"43. The Vauntguard, of four demi-cannon, fourteen culverins, eleven demi-culverins, and two sakers, all of brass.

"44. The Victory, of four culverins, twelve demi-culverins, nine sakers, seven fowler halls, thirteen fowler chambers, all of brass;. with eight culverins, and six demi-culverins, of cast-iron.

"45. The Wastspight, of two cannon, two demi-cannon, thirteen culverins, ten demi-culverins, and two sakers, all of brass."

ATTESTATION:

"For the remayne viewed and taken at Her Majesties Shippes lying in harborowe as well in the road by Chatham within the river of Medway waters, as also by Gravesende or other place within the ryver of Thames. Wee who receaved order as aforesaide for the accomplishment of that duty doe witnes the contents thereof by subscripc~on of or names.

"Step. Rislesden, John Conyers, Jhon Lee, J. Linewraye, Fra. Gofton, G. Hegge.

"Concerning the testimonial and acknowledgment of so muche as in this booke is avouched then to remayne in suche her Highenes Shippes as were ymploied in service on the seas, Wee the officers of her Majesties Ordinance, and tha foresaid John Conyers and Frauncs Gofton, her Mats auditors of the preste whoe have perused the Indentures of the Mr. Gouners of those shippes in that behalfe have hereunto subscribed or names.

"Step. Rislesden, J. Linewraye, Jhon Lee, Jo. Conyers, Fra. Gofton, G. Hegge."

  1. "Dromunder. Navigii genusapud veteres, quod Latini inferioris ævi Dromones nec non Dromundos dixêre. Vide Du Fresne, in Gloss. Et Cassiodorus. Lib. v. Epist 17. Gall. vet. Dromond. Angl. Drumbler. Vid. Nicod. Lex. Angl. A Græco δρομος, cursus, derivat Spelmannus, et cum illo quicquid fere est criticorum. Solus in diversa abit Verelius, qui exinde, quod Dromunder apud nos naves onerarias tantum designare videtur, eas a Gothico Droma, lento gradu procedere, derivat." Johannis Ihre Glossarium Suio-Gothicum in Verbo.
  2. In an original MS. account of Ordnance, &c. I Ed. VI. in the Archives of this Society, in the account of Calis, is the following article: "Shott of yrone for gret Curtowes two hundred; as are the fubsequent in the account of Hurst Castle.

    "Curtall Cannon of brasse oone."
    "Curtoll Cannon Shot of six ynches and a quarter thirty-five."

    The following, Ibid, is in the account of West Cowes Castle;

    "Curtoll Cannon of brasse furnyshed, oone.

    The same entry occurs in the account of Yarmouth Castle. In the account of East Tilbury Bulwark, Essex, we read of

    "Curtall Sacres of yron mounted uppon cariage with shodde wheks."

  3. In an original MS. containing an account of Ordnance, &c. I Ed. VI. in the Archives of this Society, in the account of those in Wark Castle, in Northumberland, is the following article:

    "Halls of a porte pece dismounted, oone."

  4. In "England's Elizabeth by Heywood, 1632," p. 186. is the following passage, wherein the word "Chambers" stands alone for a piece of ordnance.

    "As she went through Temple Barre, the ordinance and Chambers of the Tower went off, the report whereof gave much content.

    In the above-mentioned original MS. in the Archives of this Society, in the account of Calis, is the following entry:

    "Great Chambers of yron serving no piece, eight."