Chaucer's Works (ed. Skeat) Vol. VI/GlossaryL—R

GLOSSARIAL INDEX. (contd.)

Laas; see Las.

Labbe, s. blab, tell-tale, T. iii. 300; A 3509.

Labbing, pres. part. blabbing, babbling, E 2428. Cf. Du. labben, to tell tales, labbei, gossip.

Label, s. the narrow revolving rod or rule on the front of the astrolabe, A. i. 22. 1. See Fig. 6, in vol. iii.

Laborer, s. labourer, A 1409, 2025 n.

Láborous, adj. laborious, D 1428.

Labóur, s. labour, T. iv. 422; B 381; Lábour, 1. 106.

Labóure, ger. to toil, A 186; Lábouren, ger. to take pains, E 1631; Labóuren, 1 pr. pl. toil, D 1482; pr. pl. T. iii. 1265; Láboured, 1 pt. s. refl. toiled, took pains, T. iv. 1009; Labóured, pp. exercised, B 1298.

Lacche, s. snare, springe, R. 1624. Cf. A.S. gelæccan, to catch.

Lace; see Las.

Lace, v.; Laced, pp. laced up, A 3267.

Lacerte, s. a fleshy muscle, A 2753. O. F. lacerte, Lat. lacerta.

Lache, adj. lazy, dull, B 4. p 3. 82. 'Lasche, slack, ... weake, faint': Cotgrave.

Lachesse, s. laziness, I 720. O. F. laschesse, lachesse, indolence: Godefroy.

Lacinge, s. lacing; with layneres l., with the fastening up of straps, A 2504.

Lad, Ladde; see Lede.

Laddre, s. ladder, R. 485, 523; Laddres, pl. B 1. p 1. 24; A. 1. 12. 2; A 3624, B 2160.

Lade, ger. to load, cover, T. ii. 1544.

Ladel, s. ladle, A 2020, H 51.

Lady, s. 1. 16, 17, 81; B 1637, D 2200; Lady, gen. lady's, 3. 949; T. i. 99, 812, ii. 32; A 88, 695; voc. A 839; Ladyes, pl.. B 254; Ladies, A 898; The book of the nynetene Ladies, i.e. the Legend of Good Women, I 1086.

Ladyshippe, dat. ladyship, 7. 191.

Laft, Lafte; see Leve.

Lak, s. want, defect, lack, 3. 958; 7. 110; 10. 5; 15. 7; L. 1534; B 4034; blame, dispraise, L. 298 a; Lakke, dat. lack, want, 5. 87, 615; D 1306, E 2271; loss, F 430, 443; acc. fault, E 2199.

Lake, s. lake, pond, 5. 313; D 269.

Lake, s. a kind of fine white linen cloth, B 2048. Halliwell notes that shirts were formerly made of it, and quotes a passage containing the phrase 'white as lake.' The word probably was imported from the Low Countries, as laken is a common Dutch word for cloth; the Dutch for a sheet is also laken or bedlaken.

Lakken, v. find fault with, disparage, blame, R. 284; ger. to blame, T. i. 189; Lakketh, pr. s. lacks, B 1437, G 498; pr. s. impers. lacks; me lakketh, I lack, 2. 105; 3. 898; Lakke, 2 pr. pl. lack, are in want of, D 2109; Lakked, pt. s. was lacking, was wanting, A 2280, C 41; Lakkede, pt. s. impers. A 756; Lakked, F 16, 1186.

Lakking, s. lack, stint, R. 1147.

Lamb, s. 1. 172; L. 2318; A 3704, B 459, 1771, E 538; Lomb, L. 1798; B 617; Lambes, pl. I 792.

Lambe-skinnes, pl. lambskins, R. 229.

Lambik, s. limbeck; A lambik, for Alambik, T. iv. 520 n.

Lambish, adj. gentle as lambs, 9. 50.

Lame, adj. lame, weak, T. ii. 17; halting, 1. 76.

Lamentacioun, s. lamentation, A 935, B 4545.

Lampe, s. lamina, thin plate, G 764. F. lame, a thin plate, Lat. lamina. The insertion of excrescent p occurs after m in other words in Chaucer; as in solempne, dampne.

Lampes, pl. lamps, L. 2610; G 802.

Langáge, s. language, A 211, F 100.

Lange, adj. long (Northern), A 4175. (Correctly lang, without e.) See Long.

Langóur, s. weakness, 1. 7; slow starvation, R. 214; B 3597; languishing, R. 304; Lángour, s. illness, sickness, R. 970; F 1101.

Languisshe, v. fail, HF. 2018; Languissheth, pr. s. languishes, E 1867, F 950; Languisshing, pres. pt. 5. 472; 7. 178.

Languisshing, s. languishing, 7. 205.

Langureth, pr. s. languishes, E 1867 n.

Lanterne, s. lantern, T. v. 543; D 334, I 1036; Lantern, lamp, guidance, L. 926.

Lapidaire, a treatise on precious stones, HF. 1352. See note.

Lappe, s. flap, corner, B 1. p 2. 19; fold, lappet, or edge of a garment, T. ii. 448, iii. 59, 742, F 441, G 12; lap, A 686, B 3644, F 475; a wrapper, E 585. A.S. læppa, lap, border, hem.

Lappe, v.; Lappeth, pr. s. enfolds, embraces, 4. 76. (For wlappeth.)

Lapwing, s. lapwing, peewit, 5. 347.

Large, adj. large, A 472, 753; great, I 705; wide, broad, R. 1351; liberal, bounteous, R. 1168; B 3489, I 465; generous, B 1621, 2950; lavish, B 2. p 5. 16; free, 3. 893; T. v. 804; at thy l., at large, free, A 1283; at his l., free (to speak or to be silent), A 2288; free to move, HF. 745; at our large, free (to go anywhere), D 322.

Large, adv. liberally, 1. 174; freely, A 734.

Largely, adv. fully, A 1908, 2738; in a wide sense, I 804.

Largenesse, s. liberality, I 1051.

Larger, adj. comp. wider, B 4. p 6. 86.

Largesse, s. liberality, R. 1150; 7. 42; B 2. p 5. 12; I 284; bounty, B 2465; liberal bestower, 1. 13; Larges, bounty, HF. 1309.

Larke, s. lark, 5. 340; T. iii. 1191; L. 141 a; HF. 546; A 1491; Lark (before a vowel), R. 915.

Las, s. lace, snare, entanglement, L. 600; A 1817, 1951; net, A 2389; Laas, lace, i.e. thick string, A 392; band, G 574; lace (i.e. laces), R. 843; Lace, snare, entanglement, 18. 50. Compare 'Ge qui estoie pris où laz Où Amors les amans enlace': Rom. de la Rose, 15310.

Lash; see Lasshe.

Lasse, adj. comp. less, R. 118; A pr. 42; A 4409, C 602; lesser, A 1756; smaller, B 2262; less (time), A 3519; lasse and more, smaller and greater, i.e. all, E 67; the lasse, the lesser, R. 187. See Lesse.

Lasse, adv. less, 3. 927; 6. 105; L. 14, 333, 2256; the las, the less, 3. 675.

Lasshe, s. lash, 5. 178; Lash (for Lasshe, before have), stroke, T. i. 220.

Last, s. pl. lasts, i.e. burdens, loads, B 1628. See the note. A.S. hlæst, a burden, load, a ship's freight; from hladan, to lade.

Laste, adj. def. perhaps lowest (see note), B 2. p 5. 35; last, 10. 71; atte l., at last, 3. 364, 1194, 1221; lastly, B 2. p 6. 85; A. 707.

Laste, v. last, endure, 4. 226; Last, pr. s. lasts, 5. 49; B 2. p 4. 58; T. iv. 588; L. 2241; E 266; Laste, pt. s. lasted, 2. 16; B 1826; delayed, L. 791; pt. pl. 3. 177; B 3390, 3508; pt. s. subj. might last, L. 1239.

Lat, let; see Lete.

Late, adj. late, B 4. m 6. 11; tardy, B 4. p 4. 30; slowly revolving, B 4. m 5. 4; bet than never is late, G 1410; til now late, till it was already late, 3. 45.

Late, adv. lately, A 77, 690.

Late, -n, let; see Lete.

Lathe, s. barn (Northern), HF. 2140; A 4088. Icel. hlaða.

Latin, s. Latin, B 519.

Latis, s. lattice, T. ii. 615. (Many MSS. have gates; see note.)

Latitude, s. (1) breadth, A. i. 21. 27; (2) the breadth of a climate, or a line along which such breadth is measured, A. ii. 39. 19; (3) astronomical, the angular distance of any body from the ecliptic, measured along a great circle at right angles to the ecliptic, A. pr. 71; (4) terrestrial, the distance of a place N. or S. of the equator, A. ii. 39. 24; B 13, E 1797.

Latoun, s. latten, a compound metal, like pinchbeck, containing chiefly copper and zinc, A 699, 3251, C 351, F 1245; Laton, B 2067.

Latrede, adj. tardy, dawdling, I 718. A.S. latrǣde.

Latter, adv. later, more slowly, I 971.

Laude, s. praise, honour, HF. 1575, 1673, 1795; B 1645, 3286, D 1353; Laudes, pl. HF. 1322; lauds (see note), A 3655.

Laughe, v. laugh, A 474, E 353; Laughen, v. L. 1251; T. iii. 613; ger. 18. 28; 22. 10; Laugheth, pr. s. 7. 234; Laugheth of, smiles on account of, A 1494; Lough, strong pt. s. laughed, R. 248; T. i. 1037, ii. 1163, 1592, iii. 199, 561, v. 1172; A 3114, 3858, B 1300, 3740, C 476, 961, D 672; Laughede, weak pt. pl. R. 863; Laughen, pp. laughed, A 3855; Laughinge, pres. pt. 3. 633.

Laughter, s. 3. 600; 5. 575; T. ii. 1169.

Launce, v. fling themselves about, rear, HF. 946. See Launcheth.

Launcegay, s. a kind of lance, B 1942, 2011. See note to B 1942.

Launcheth, pr. s. pushes, lets slide, D 2145. See Launce.

Launde, s. a grassy clearing (called dale in 5. 327), 5. 302; glade, plain surrounded by trees, A 1691, 1696. O.F. lande; mod. E. lawn.

Laure, s. laurel-tree, HF. 1107. Lat. laurus; O.F. laure. See Laurer.

Laureat, adj. laureate, crowned with laurel, B 3886, E 31.

Laurer, s. laurel, laurel-tree, 5. 182; 7. 19, 24; T. iii. 541, 727; A 1027, 2922, E 1466. O.F. laurier. See Laure, Lorer.

Laurer-crouned, laurel-crowned, 7. 43; T. v. 1107.

Lauriol, s. spurge-laurel, Daphne Laureola, B 4153.

Laus, adj. loose, B 4. p 6. 93; Lause, pl. B 2. m 4. 7. Icel. lauss. See Loos.

Laven, ger. to exhaust, B 4. p 6. 9; Laved, pp. drawn up (see note), B 3. m 12. 16. A.S. lafian.

Lavender, s. laundress, L. 358. See note.

Laverokkes, pl. larks, sky-larks, R. 662. See Larke.

Lavours, pl. lavers, basins, D 287.

Lawe, s. law, 3. 632; A 577, 1164, B 1189, 3870, D 1889; Lawes, pl. customs, T. ii. 42.

Laxatif, adj. as s. looseness, A 2736; Laxatyf, s. laxative, B 4133; Laxatyves, pl. B 4152, 4344.

Lay (1), s. song, lay, 3. 471; 18. 71; T. ii. 921; L. 430; B 1959; E 1881; Layes, pl. songs, L. 140; R. 715; F. 710, 712, 947. O.F. lai.

Lay (2), s. law; hence belief, faith, T. i. 340, 1001; creed, L. 336, B 376, 572, F 18. A.F. lei, law, creed.

Lay, pt. s. of Lye (1).

Layneres, pl. straps, thongs, A 2504. O.F. laniere; mod. E. lanyard. See Lacinge.

Layser, s. leisure, T. ii. 227; iii. 510, 516. See Leyser.

Lazar, s. leper, A 242; Lazars, pl. 245.

Leche, s. physician, 1. 134; 3. 920; B 1. p 4. 3; T. i. 858, ii. 571; A 3904, C 916, D 1892, G 56; Leches, pl. T. v. 369, D 1957.

Lechecraft, s. art of medicine, T. iv. 436; skill of a physician, A 2745.

Lecher, s. healer, B 4. p 6. 148. From M.E. lechen, to heal.

Lecherous, adj. A 626; provoking to lechery, C 549; Lecherous folk, answering to Dante's 'i peccator carnali,' 5. 79.

Lecherye, s. lechery, lust, C 481; Lecherie, I 346.

Lechour, s. lecher, B 1935, D 242, 767, E 2257, 2298; Lechours, pl. D 1310. O.F. lecheor (Godefroy).

Lede, v. lead, T. i. 259; carry, T. iv. 1514; lead, take, L. 2021; draw, R. 1608; govern, B 434; lead (his life), R. 1321; lead, R. 1129; Lede, ger. to lead, spend, F 744; to guide, R. 400; Leden, ger. to carry, B 2. m 5. 15; Ledest, 2 pr. s. leadest, 1. 154; guidest, F 866; Ledeth, pr. s. produces, B 4. p 6. 59; guides, L. 85; Let, pr. s. leads, T. ii. 882; B 1496; Leden, pr. pl. lead, I 141; conduct, A. pr. 28; F 898; Lede, pr. s. subj. lead (us) on, T. v. 897; may bring, B 357; Ladde, pt. s. led, R. 581; 3. 365; L. 276 a; T. iii. 1714; A 1446, B 976, G 370, 374; brought, 7. 39; A 2275, B 1524; carried, L. 114; B 3338; conducted, B 3747; continued, R. 216; Ladden, pt. pl. led, R. 1310; Ledden, pt. pl. 9. 2; Ladde, pt. pl. B 3920, E 390; Lad, pp. led, L. 1108, 1948; T. i. 872; A 4232, B 646, 3552, 3570, E 2415, F 172; brought, A 2620; conducted, A 4402; brought about, B 5. p 4. 52; carried, L. 74. A.S. lǣdan.

Leden (lèèdən), adj. leaden, G 728. A.S. lēaden.

Ledene, s. (dat.) language, talk, F 435, 478. A.S. leden, a corruption of the word Latinus, meaning (1) Latin; (2) any language or speech.

Ledère, s. leader, T. iv. 1454; Leder, B 1. p 3. 49, 52.

Leed (lèèd), s. lead (metal), HF. 739, 1448, 1648; G 406, 828; a copper, or caldron, A 202 (see note); Lede, dat. HF. 1431. A.S. lēad.

Leef (lééf), adj. lief, 19. 5; A 1837; dear, R. 103, 206, 848; 3. 8; T. iii. 864, 869, 870; L. 2636; B 3468; dear, precious, G 1467; lief, pleasing, T. v. 1738; pleasant, R. 1688; beloved, B 2. p 3. 23; yow so leef, so desired by you, C 760; that leef me were, which I should like, HF. 1999; Leve, def. dear (one), A 3393; vocative, HF. 816; L. 1978; T. ii. 251; A 1136, 1184, 3151, 3848, B 51, C 731, D 365, 762, 1005, 1171, 1751, F 1607; beloved, G 257; Lefe, adj. fem. voc. HF. 1827; Leve, pl. dear, T. iv. 82, v. 592; G 383; dear, valued, F 341. A.S. lēof. See below.

Leef, (lééf), adj. as s., what is pleasant; for l. ne looth, for weal nor for woe, L. 1639; what is dear (to him), T. iv. 1585; beloved one, lover, lady-love, T. iii. 3; R. 845, 847, 875, 1302; L. 880, 1260, 1654. See Lief.

Leef (lèèf), s. leaf, L. 72, 189; B 1340, E 1211; leaf (of a book), A 3177; Leves, pl. leaves, R. 56; L 219; 5. 137, 173, 202; F 908, I 114; (of a book) D 790. A.S. lēaf.

Leef, imp. s. of Leve (leave).

Leefer, dearer, L. 75 a. See Lever.

Leefful; see Leveful.

Leefsel, s. the 'bush' at a tavern-door, I 411 (see note); Levesel, arbour of leaves, A 4060 (see note).

Leek (lèèk), s. leek, R. 212; HF. 1708; A 3879, D 572, E 1350; a thing of no value, G 795; Lekes, pl. A 634.

Leen, imp. s. of Lene.

Leep (léép), pt. s. of Lèpe.

Lees (lèès), s. leash, G 19, I 387; snare, 7. 233.

Lees (lèès), adj. untrue, R. 8. A.S. lēas.

Lees (lèès), s. deceit, fraud; a shrewed lees, a wicked fraud, L. 1545; withouten lees, without deceit, verily, HF. 1464; L. 1022, 1128, 1518. See above; and see Lesing.

Lees (lèès), pt. s. of Lese.

Leeste, adj. sup. least; B 2513, F 1060; atte l. weye, at the very least, A 1121; Leest, I 147.

Leet (léét), pt. s. of Lete.

Lef, imp. s. of Leve (leave).

Lefe, adj. fem. voc. dear, HF. 1827. See Lééf.

Left, -e; see Leve (leave), v.

Left hand, A 2953. See Lift.

Leful; see Leveful.

Leg, s. B 4505, D 1828; Legges, pl. legs, A 591.

Legende, s. legend, L. 483, 2456; A 3141, B 4311; sad story (as of a martyr), B 1335; Legendes of seintes, legends of saints, I 1088.

Legge, -n; see Leye, v.

Legiouns, s. pl. legions, B 3544.

Leide, 1 pt. s. of Leye.

Leigh, pt. s. of Lye (2).

Leith, pr. s. of Leye.

Lekes, pl. leeks, A 634; see Leek.

Lēmes (léémez), pl. flames, B 4120. A.S. lēoma.

Lĕmes, pl. limbs, A 3886. (So E.; Hn. Cm. limes.)

Lemman, s. masc. (male) lover, sweetheart, A 4240, 4247, B 917, H 204; fem. (female) lover, lady-love, R. 1209, 1272; A 3278, 3280, B 1978, 3253, D 722, H 220; Lemmans, pl. fem. sweethearts, D 1998; Lemmanes, pl. concubines, I 903. A.S. lēof-man, dear person; man being of either gender.

Lendes, pl. loins, A 3237, 3304. A.S. lenden, pl. lendenu.

Lene (lèène), adj. lean, thin, R. 218, 444; 11. 28; T. i. 553, v. 709; A 287, 591, 1362, B 4003; weak, T. ii. 132. A.S. hlǣne.

Lene, ger. to lend, give, A 611; to lend, G 1024, 1037, I 810; v. give, B 1209; Leneth, pr. s. lends, R. 186; gives, B 4. p 6. 151; Lene, imp. s. lend, B 1376, 1377, G 1026; Leen, imp. s. give, A 3082. A.S. lǣnan.

Lene, v. lean, incline, B 2638; Leninge, pres. pt. leaning, L. 179; Lening, 234 a. A.S. hleonian.

Lenesse, s. leanness, R. 307.

Leng, adv. longer; ever l. the wers, the worse, the longer it lasts, A 3872. See Lenger.

Lenger, adj. longer, L. 450, 2025; A 330, 821; B 262, D 205, 1020, E 300; Lengere, pl. A. ii. 10. 2. A.S. lengra.

Lenger, adv. longer, 2. 95 (see note); 5. 453, 657; T. i. 1072; L. 671; B 374, 2122, 3709, C 200, F 381; ever the l., the longer, the more, 7. 129; ever l. the more, E 687, F 404. See Leng.

Lengest, adv. sup. longest, 5. 549.

Lengthe, s. length, 2. 8; HF. 1979; height, A 83; upon l., after a long run, 3. 352.

Lengthe, v. lengthen; Lengthing, pres. part. extending, A ii. 25. 41.

Lente, s. Lent-season, Lent, D 543, E 12, I 103. A.S. lencten.

Lenvoy, s. l'envoy, i.e. the epilogue or postscript addressed to the hearers or readers, E 1177 (rubric). F. l'envoi, lit. a sending, from envoyer, to send.

Leonesse, s. lioness, L. 805, 817, 861, D 637.

Leonyn, adj. lionlike, B 3836.

Leopard, s. leopard, A 2186 n. See Lepart.

Leos, s. people, G 103, 106. Gk. λεώς; see the note.

Leoun, s. lion, L. 627, 829, 1214, 1605; T. i. 1074; A 1598, B 3106, 3215, 3288, D 429, 692, F 491; Leouns, pl. B 3451; Léon, the sign Leo, F 265. See Lyoun.

Lepárt, s. leopard, A 2186; Lepárdes, pl. B 3451; Libardes, R. 894.

Lepe (lèèpə) v. run, T. ii. 955; A 4378; leap, L. 2008; ger. to run, T. ii. 512; to run fast, HF. 946; Lepe up, v. leap up, HF. 2150; Lepe, pr. pl. spring, G 915; Léép, pt. s. leapt, L. 2709; A 2687, 4228, E 2411; Leping, pres. pt. running, T. ii. 939; HF. 1823; Lepinge, pres. pt. running, D 2157; Leping, pres. pt. leaping, R. 1403. A.S. hlēapan.

Lere, s. flesh, skin, B 2047. This is quite a different word from O.E. ler, the face, countenance, from A.S. hlēor. Properly it means the muscles, especially the muscles of the thigh, which special sense is perfectly suitable here. It is the A.S. lira, flesh, muscle; Icel. lær, the thigh, the leg above the knee, the ham; Danish laar, the thigh. Halliwell gives: 'Lire (1), flesh, meat; swynes lire [swine's flesh], Ord. and Reg. p. 442; lyery, abounding with lean flesh; North of England; (2) face, countenance'; &c.

Lere, ger. (1) to teach, 7. 98; v. teach, T. iv. 441; HF. 764; ger. (2) to learn, T. v. 161; B 181, 630, G 838, 1056, 1349; v. HF. 993, 1997, 2026; B 1702, C 325, 578, D 982; Lere, ger. to learn, find out, D 909; Lere, pr. pl. (1) teach, 5. 25; (2) learn, F 104; Lere, pr. s. subj. may learn, G 607; Lere, imp. pl. (1) teach, T. ii. 97; Lered, pp. (2) learnt, T. iii. 406; L. 1153. A.S. lǣran, to teach.

Lered, adj. instructed, learned, C 283; 5. 46. A.S. lǣred. See above.

Lerne, v. learn, A 308, D 994; ger. 3. 1091; 5. 1; Lernen, ger. HF. 1088; Lerne, imp. s. L. 477; Lerned, pp. learnt, 3. 786; A 613, 640; Lerned of, taught by, G 748. (Chaucer here uses the word wrongly, as so does mod. prov. English. The A.S. leornian meant to learn, like mod. G. lernen.)

Lerned, pp. as adj. learned, A 480, 575, B 1168.

Lerninge, s. learning, A 300; instruction, G 184.

Lese (lèèzə), s. dat. pasture, T. ii. 752; HF. 1768. A.S. lǣs; dat. lǣswe.

Lese (léézə), v. lose, 5. 402; T. iv. 188; L. 1362, 1810, 2595, 2698; A 1215, 1290, 3521, B 4332, C 145, G 229, 833; ger. T. ii. 472, iii. 832; L. 2389; E 508, F 691, G 321; Lesen, v. B 2. p 4. 100, 114; T. v. 798; B 2266; Lese me, v. lose myself, be lost, 5. 147; Lese, 1 pr. s. subj. B 225; Leseth, pr. s. 3. 33; Leseth, 2 pr. pl. 21. 19; Lesen, pr. pl. R. 448; Lees, pt. s. lost, L. 945; HF. 1414; Leseth, imp. pl. B 19; Loren, pp. lost, T. iv. 957; L. 1048; Lorn, pp. lost, T. i. 373, iii. 1076, iv. 1613; HF. 346; L. 659; A 3536, 4073, B 774, 843, 2183, 3230, E 1071, F 629, 1037, I 224; forlorn, wasted, R. 366; Lore, 2. 77; 3. 748. A.S. lēosan, pt. t. lēas, pp. loren.

Lesing (lèèzing), s. falsehood, lie, B 5. p 3. 80; HF. 2089; G 479; Lesinge, HF. 154; I 593; Lesinges, pl. lies, deceits, R. 2; HF. 676; B 1. p 4. 118; A 1927, C 591, I 608, 1020; lying reports, HF. 2123. A.S. lēasung.

Lesinge (léézing), s. loss, B 4. p 6. 214; I 1056; Lesing, A 1707; for lesinge, for fear of losing, B 3750. See Lese.

Lesse, adj. less, R. 288; 3. 965; 7. 143. See Lasse.

Lessen, v. grow less, T. v. 1438; Lesse, v. diminish, 25. 19 (see vol. iv. p. xxviii).

Lessoun, s. lesson, lection, A 709; lesson, 1. 179; Lessoun, 4. 33; T. iii. 51. (Accented both as lésson and lessóun.)

Lest, s. pleasure, 3. 908; T. 1. 330, ii. 787; delight, A 132; desire, E 619; inclination, HF. 287; Lestes, pl. desires, HF. 1738. See List, Lust. A Kentish form; A.S. lyst.

Lest, pr. s. impers. (it) pleases, L. 1703; D 854, 1237, E 2396, F 1041, I 36; A. ii. 25. 39; (it) pleases (me), D 360; Thee lest, it pleases thee, 5. 114; Lesteth, (it) pleases, L. 480 a; Leste, pt. s. impers. (it) pleased, T. v. 517; L. 615, 1973, 2312, 2469, 2470; A 750, 787, 1004, 3421; pers. was pleased, T. iii. 452; Leste, pr. s. subj. (it) may please, L. 1338; A 1848, B 742, E 105, F 125, 885; As yow leste, as it may please you, L. 449; Leste, (it) might please, L. 1113; T. i. 189; HF. 282; E 111; (it) would please, F 380; Her leste, it should please her, 5. 551. Kentish forms; cf. A.S. lystan.

Lest that, conj. lest, B 2406.

Leste, adj. superl. least, T. i. 281; L. 304 a; A. i. 17. 2; B 1012; at the l., at least, 3. 973; 4. 19; T. ii. 362; atte l., at least, B 38, F 1164; Leste, as s., the least one, 3. 283; at the leeste weye, at any rate, E 966; Leeste, pl. F 300.

Let, pr. s. of Lede.

Lete, v. let, B 3524; let, leave, A 1335; give up, let go, T. v. 1688; forsake, T. iv. 1199; B 325; D 31; let alone, leave, D 1276; quit, 1. 72; give up, lose, G 406, 523; omit, depart from, 5. 391; Lete of, ger. to leave off, 18. 52; Leten, v. let, L. 2107; give up, R. 1690; forsake, T. iv. 1556; cease, B 1. p 4. 109; Leten, ger. to leave, B 4. p 4. 102; to let go, T. i. 262; to consider, to deem, B 2. p 3. 18; B 2. p 8. 23; Late, v. let, T. iii. 693, v. 351; Laten, v. let, A 3326; Lete, 1 pr. s. leave, 7. 45; L. 2382; A 1323, F 890; let, L. 1210; B 321, 410, 1119; Let, pr. s. lets go, repels, 5. 151; Lat, pr. s. lets, permits, T. iv. 200; Leteth, pr. s. abandons, B 1. p 5. 24; Lete, 2 pr. pl. abandon, B 2505; Léét, pt. s.. let, L. 813, 1734; A 128, 175, E 82, G 190; let go, A 1206; allowed, HF. 243; left off, A 3311, 4214; left, A 508; caused, permitted, B 373; caused, B 2194; caused (to be), B 959; leet ... fecche, commanded (men) to fetch, D 2064; leet don cryen, caused to be proclaimed, F 45; leet make, caused to be made, B 3349; leet binde, caused to be bound, B 1810; commanded, bade, C 208; considered, T. i. 302; Let, pt. s. caused, L. 2624; let calle, caused to be called, L. 1864; Leet, 1 pt. s. made, pretended, T. ii. 543; let, 5. 279; Lete, pt. pl. let, B 3898; Lete, pt. s. subj. were to let, T. iii. 1762; Leet, imp. s. let, C 731; Lat, imp. s. let, 1. 79, 84; L. 256, 568; A. ii. 29. 14; A 188, B 2456, E 162, G 164; let alone, give up, T. ii. 1500; Lat be, let be, do away with, A 840; let me alone, A 3285; give up, HF. 992; Lat do, cause, C 173; Lat take, take, G 1254, H 175; Lat see, let us see, A 831; Lat goon, let slip (the dogs), L. 1213; Lete, imp. pl. let, E 98; Lat, imp. pl. B 2156; Leteth, imp. pl. cease from, L. 411; Leten, pp. let (in), admitted, R. 700; Leten goon, let go, HF. 1934; Lete, pp. let, D 767; Laten blood, pp. let blood (see note), A 4346; Letinge, pres. pt. leaving, T. v. 1810. A.S. lǣtan.

Lette, s. hindrance, T. i. 361, iii. 699, 748; delay, T. iii. 235, iv. 41, v. 851; E 300.

Lette, v. hinder, T. ii. 732; B 1276, 2116, D 154; prevent, L. 732; oppose, stay, B 3306; cause delay, B 1117; wait, B 1440; tarry, B 4224; stop, desist, B 4279; cease, R. 279; 4. 186; 5. 439; ger. HF. 1954; Letten, v. hinder, delay, A 889; hinder, stop, T. iv. 529; give up, cease from, T. i. 150; Letten, ger. to put obstacles in the way (of), to decline (from), A 1317; Lettest, 2 pr. s. hinderest, D 839; stoppest, L. 325, 757; Letteth, pr. s. hinders, E 1573; Let, pr. s. prevents, B 3. p 10. 110; Lette, pr. s. subj.; lette him no man, god forbede, God forbid that any should hinder him, T. iii. 545; Lette, pr. pl. subj. let, hinder, F 994; Letted, pt. s. hindered, A 1891; was hindered, B 2591; Lette, pt. s. hindered, B 4030; waited, HF. 2070; tarried, L. 2167; ceased, T. ii. 1089; desisted, T. iii. 473; delayed, E 389; Let, pp. hindered, T. ii. 94, v. 1302; B 3788; thwarted, T. iii. 717; Lette, imp. s. hinder, T. iii. 725; Letteth, imp. pl. hesitate, T. ii. 1136. A.S. lettan.

Lette-game, s. 'let-game,' one who hinders sport, T. iii. 527.

Letter, s. letter, reading, 3. 788; Lettre, writing, B 3398; inscription, R. 1543; Lettres, pl. letters, (also as sing. a letter), B 736; 5. 19.

Lettrure, s. learning, B 3486; Letterure, literature, book-lore, B 3686; G 846.

Letuarie, s. electuary, remedy, T. v. 741; C 307; E 1809; Letuaries, pl. electuaries, A 426. 'Letuaire, électuaire, sorte de médicament, sirop': Godefroy. Lat. electuarium.

Leve (léévə), dear; see Lééf.

Leve (lèèvə), s. leave, 3. 153; 4. 9, 153; 6. 11; T. i. 126; HF. 1089; B 1637, D 908, E 2194, F 363, 584; permission, L. 2281, B 3136, C 848, G 373; bisyde hir leve, without her leave, T. iii. 622.

Leve (1) v. leave, E 250, F 828; let alone, G 714; let go, 3. 1111; go away, 5. 153; leave alone, T. i. 688; ger. to leave off, T. i. 686; A 4414; to forsake, G 287; Leve, 1 pr. s. leave, 2. 50; Leveth, pr. s. remains, 3. 701; A. ii. 10. 10, 44. 29; Lafte, 1 pt. s. left, C 762; Lefte, left off, F 670; Lafte, pt. s. left, L. 1332, 1657; left, ceased, B 3496; Lefte, pt. s. left off, T. ii. 560; Lafte, pt. pl. left, L. 968; B 3388; Laften, pt. pl. L. 168; Left, pp. left off, B 1. p 6. 53; omitted, I 231; Laft, pp. left, L. 1260, 1330; F 186, 263, G 883, 1321; Leef, imp. s. leave, T. iv. 852, 896, 924; leave (it) alone, T. v. 1518; Lef, imp. s. forego, D 2089; Leve, imp. s. leave, A 1614; Leveth, imp. pl. leave, 6. 118; B 2650, C 659. A.S. lǣfan.

Leve (2) v. believe, 5. 496; L. 10; T. ii. 420; D 319; ger. to be believed, HF. 708; Leve, 1 pr. s. 3. 691; L. 1615; T. i. 342; G 213; Levestow, believest thou, G 212; Leveth, pr. s. E 1001; Leve, 1 pr. pl. B 1181; 2 pr. pl. T. ii. 1141; imp. s. 3. 1047, 1148; Leveth, imp. pl. believe, 6. 88; L. 88 a; A 3088, B 2944. A.S. lēfan, lȳfan.

Leve (3) ger. to allow, L. 2280; god leve, God grant, L. 2083, 2086; T. i. 597, ii. 1212, iii. 56, v. 959, B 1873 (see note), D 1644. A.S. lēfan, lȳfan.

Leveful, adj. allowable, A 3912; B 4. p 4. 197; permissible, B 1. p 3. 13; D 37, E 1448, G 5, I 506, 777, 778; permitted, B 4. p 6. 243; Leefful, allowable, I 41, 917; Leful, permissible, T. iii. 1020. See Leve, s. (leave).

Level, s. level (for ascertaining that a thing is level), A. ii. 38. 4.

Levene, s. flash of lightning, D 276. See Stratmann.

Lever (lééver), adj. comp. liefer, rather, B 4. p 5. 4; me were lever, I had rather, T. i. 1034, iii. 574; B 3628, C 615, H 23; me nis lever, L. 191; me wer l., A 3751; thee were l., thou hadst rather, B 2339; him was l., A 293; him were l., L. 2413; have I l., I would rather, T. ii. 471; F 1360; hadde I l., D 168, G 1376, H 78; hath l., F 692, H 170; 17. 13; hadde l., L. 1536; F 683; had hir l., she would rather, E 444; him had be l. he would rather, A 3541. See Leefer.

Leves (lèèvez), leaves; pl. of Lèèf.

Levesel; see Leefsel.

Levest (léévest), sup. dearest, most desirable, HF. 87; liefest, T. ii. 189.

Lewed, adj. ignorant, 5. 46, 616; HF. 866; L. 415; A 502, 574, 3145, 3455, B 315, C 392, D 1346, E 2275, F 221, G 497, 647, 787; unlearned, A. pr. 43; C 283; unskilled, rude, HF. 1096; wicked, foolish, F 1494; wanton, E 2129; Lewede, pl. ignorant, T. i. 198. A.S. lǣwed.

Lewedeste, adj. superl. lewdest, H 184.

Lewedly, adv. in an unlearned manner, simply, HF. 866; ignorantly, B 47; ill, G 430, H 59.

Lewednesse, s. ignorance, ignorant behaviour, 11. 68; B 2111, D 1928; Lewednes, 5. 520; F 223. See Lewed.

Ley, lied; pt. s. of Lye.

Leye, v. lay, 4. 205; T. ii. 994, v. 1846; B 713, D 2264; lay, cause to lie, T. iii. 659; lay a wager, HF. 674, 2054; G 596; bet, pledge, T. iii. 1605; Leye a rekeninge, enter into a calculation (calculum ponere), B 2. p 3. 48; ger. B 1955; Leyn, ger. to lay up, to hoard, R. 184; Leggen, ger. to lay, A 3269; Legge, v. A 3937; Leye, 1 pr. s. lay, T. i. 1053; lay a wager, bet, T. ii. 1505; Leyth, pr. s. A 4229; Leith, pr. s. D 2138; Leye, 1 pr. pl. lay out, expend, G 783; Leyn, pr. pl. lay, H 222; Leide, 1 pt. s. laid, A. ii. 1. 8; Leyde, pt. s. 3. 394; HF. 260; B 1971, 3289, 3827, D 973; Leyde, 2 pt. pl. L. 2501; Leyden forth, pt. pl. brought forward, B 213; Leyd, pp. laid, T. iii. 687; A 3262; placed, R. 1184; overlaid, R. 1076; I was leyd, I had laid myself down, L. 208; Leyd, pp. laid, A 81, B 3371, G 441; fixed, 3. 1146; set, 3. 1036; Ley, imp. s. T. ii. 1517; L. 250; A. ii. 1. 1; A 841; Ley on, lay on, A 2558. A.S. lecgan.

Leyser, s. leisure, R. 462; 3. 172; 5. 464, 487; 6. 11; 18. 3; A 1188, B 2219, 3498, D 551, 1646, E 286, F 493, 977; deliberation, B 2766; opportunity, T. ii. 1369; A 3293. See Layser.

Leyt, s. flame (of a candle), I 954. A.S. lēget, lȳget, līget; M.E. leit, lightning.

Libardes, pl. leopards, R. 894. See Lepart.

Libel, s. written declaration, D 1595.

Libertee, s. liberty, T. v. 285.

Librarie, s. library, B 1. p 4. 10.

Licence, s. permission, D 855; leave, B 1253, 2254.

Licentiat, adj. one licensed by the pope to hear confessions and administer penance in all places, independently of the local ordinaries, A 220.

Liche, adj. like, R. 1073; L. 1529, 2290; similar, 7. 76; it liche, like it, F 62.

Liche, adv. alike, HF. 10.

Liche-wake, s. watch over a corpse, A 2958. Cf. A.S. līc, body.

Licorycë, s. liquorice, R. 1368; Licorys (before a vowel, for Licoryce), A 3207.

Licóur, s. moisture, A 3; liquor, T. iv. 520; Lícour, juice, C 452.

Lief, adj. dear, A 3501; Lief to, glad to, given to, A 3510; cherished, E 479; goode lief my wyf, my dear good wife, B 3084; hadde as lief, would as soon, D 1574; as s. dear one, B 4069, D 431. See Leef.

Lieges; see Lige.

Lift, adj. left (said of the left hand or side); R. 163; A. ii. 2. 2; B 2502. See Left.

Lifte, v.; Lifteth, pr. s. lifts, 882.

Liftinge, s. lifting, H 67.

Lige, adj. liege, C 337, E 310, F 111; voc. D 1037; Lige man, vassal, L. 379; Liges, s. pl. vassals, L. 382; B 3584, E 67; Lieges, s. pl. subjects, B 240. F. lige, from O. H. G. ledic (G. ledig), free. A liege lord was a free lord; in course of time his subjects were called lieges, no doubt from confusion with Lat. ligare, to bind.

Ligeaunce, s. allegiance, B 895.

Liggen, v. lie, B 2101; T. iii. 660; Liggen, pr. pl. lie, T. iii. 685; A 2205, B 4415; 2 pr. pl. T. iii. 669; Ligge, 2 pr. s. subj. lie, T. v. 411; Liggeth, imp. pl. lie, T. iii. 948; remain, B 2. m 7. 17; Ligginge, pres. pt. lying, B 4. m 7. 14; T. iv. 29; Ligging, T. i. 915; A 1011. A.S. licgan. See Lye.

Light, s. candle, T. iii. 979, 1136; light, shining, E 1124; Lighte, dat. 3. 1; A 3396 (stood in his light).

Light, adj. light-minded, B 4. p 3. 83; lightsome, joyous, R. 77; 3. 1175; undepressed (leuis), B 5. m 5. 12; active, nimble, R. 832; easy, 3. 526; 5. 553; wearing but few clothes (also, fickle), 21. 20; Lighte, dat. sing. A. pr. 36; def. light, T. v. 1808; joyous, R. 746; Lighte, pl. light (of weight), 5. 188; easy, A. pr. 36; transitory, B 1. m 1. 17 (Lat. leuibus); mild, B 4. p 6. 142; trivial, B 4. p 2. 112.

Lighte, adv. brilliantly, R. 1109.

Lighte, ger. (1) to make light, rejoice, T. v. 634; to render cheerful, T. i. 293; Lighte, v. alleviate, T. iii. 1082; (2) ger. to feel light, to be glad, F 396, 914; Lighte, pt. s. lighted; either in the sense (1) lightened, made light, made happy (see the note); or (2) illuminated, B 1661.

Lighte, v. alight, descend, HF. 508; pr. pt. alight, L. 1713; Lighte, pt. s. alighted, B 786, 1104, F 169, 1183, 1248; in th' alighte, alighted in thee, B 1660.

Lighten, v. shine, I 1037; shine out, B 3. m 11. 8; Lighted, pp. brightened, 1. 74; Light, pp. lighted, illuminated, L. 2506; Lighte, imp. s. illumine, G 71.

Lighter, adv. comp. more easily, more readily; The lighter merciable, more readily merciful on that account, L. 410.

Lightles, adj. deprived of light, T. iii. 550.

Lightly, adv. lightly, F 390; readily, 4. 205; quickly, I 534; easily, T. ii. 289; A. ii. 14. 8; B 2229, G 1400, H 8, 77, I 1026, 1041; carelessly, I 1023; joyfully, A 1870; equably, B 2. p 7. 91.

Lightne, v.; Lightneth, pr. s. enlightens, clears, B 4. p 4. 132; Lightned, pp. enlightened, illuminated, F 1050.

Lightnesse (1), s. brightness, 5. 263.

Lightnesse (2), s. agility, A 3383.

Lightsom, adj. lightsome, gay, R. 936.

Ligne, s. line, T. v. 1481.

Ligne aloes, wood of the aloe, T. iv. 1137. (Properly a compound, i.e. ligne-aloes; where aloes is a plural form.) See Aloes.

Likerous, adj. lecherous, 9. 57; H 189; wanton, A 3244, 3345, E 214; gluttonous, C 540; greedy after indulgence, D 466; desirous, eager, F 1119; very vile (Lat. nequissimi), B 3. p 4. 19. Cf. O. F. lekiere, variant of lecheor, a lecher.

Likerousnesse, s. lecherousness, D 611; licentiousness, I 430; greediness, I 377; eagerness, I 741; appetite, C 84. See above.

Likned, pp. likened, B 2807.

Lilie, s. lily, R. 1015; A 1036, C 32, G 87, 220; l. floures, lily-flowers, L. 161 a.

Lilting-horne, s. horn to be played for a lilt, HF. 1223.

Limaille; see Lymaille.

Lĭme, s. limb, 3. 499; Limes, pl. limbs, R. 830; B 3. p 3. 64; T. i. 282, v. 709; A 2135, 2714, B 461, 772, 3802, C 35, E 682; members, I 136; Limmes, pl. limbs, 3. 959; B 3284; Lemes, A 3886. A.S. lim.

Limitacioun, s. limit, D 877.

Limitour, s. limitor, a friar licensed to beg for alms within a certain limit, A 209, D 874, 1265, 1711; Limitours, pl. D 866.

Linage, s. lineage, race, B 5. p 3. 146; A 1110, E 71, 795; family, D 1135; noble family, R. 258; descent, lineage, B 2751; noble family, R. 258; high birth, B 3441, E 991; birth, descent, L. 1820, 2526; kinsfolk, B 2192; kindred, B 999; consanguinity, L. 2602.

Lind, s. lime-tree, A 2922; Linde, dat. E 1211; Lindes, pl. R. 1385. A.S. lind.

Lippe, s. lip, A 133; Lippes, pl. A 128.

Lipsed, pt. s. lisped, A 264.

Lisse, s. comfort, T. v. 550; joy, T. iii. 343; assuaging, HF. 220; solace, 3. 1040; alleviation, F 1238. A.S. liss.

Lissen, v. alleviate, T. i. 702; Lisse, v. soothe, 6. 6; Lisse, pr. s. subj. 3. 210; Lissed, pp. relieved, F 1170. A.S. lissian.

List (1), s. pleasure, T. iii. 1303; will, D 633. See Lest, Lust.

List (2), s. ear, D 634. A.S. hlyst, hearing; see (h)lüst in Stratmann.

List, pr. s. impers. it pleases (usually with dat.), 5. 441; 7. 231; L. 2042, 2179; A. ii. 3. 1; A 1201, B 521, 701, 766, C 13, D 153, E 647, 933, F 118, 122, 161, 315, G 234, I 69; me list right evel, I was in no mind to, 3. 239; you list, it pleases you, 11. 77; List, pr. s. pers. is pleased, pleases, T. i. 518, 797; 1. 172; 16.35; L. 2249; wishes, A 3176; B 3185, 3330, 3509, 3709; Listeth, pr. s. impers. (it) pleases, T. ii. 700; pers. pleases, is pleased, HF. 511; likes, F 689; Listen, 2 pr. pl. are pleased, T. iii. 1810; Listen, pr. pl. list, choose, B 2234; Listen trete, choose to write, L. 575; Liste, pt. s. impers. (it) pleased, L. 332, 1244; 7. 190, 199; A 102, 1052, B 1048, G 1313; T. iii. 21; her liste, it pleased her, she cared, 3. 878, 962; 7. 190; him liste, he wanted, 4. 92; hem liste, (it) pleased them, F 851; Liste pt. s. pers. liked, L. 1407; Liste, pr. s. subj. may please, R. 14; A. ii. 27. 1; L. 2387; D 318, F 327. A.S. lystan. See Lest.

Listes, pl. in sing. sense, lists, a place enclosed for tournaments, A 63; place of tournament, A 1713, 1862, 1884, F 668.

Listes, s. pl. wiles; in his l., by means of his wiles, 1. 85.

Listeth, imp. pl. listen ye, B 1902, 2023. A.S. hlystan, to hear.

Litarge, s. litharge, ointment prepared from protoxide of lead, A 629; protoxide of lead, G 775. See Webster.

Litargie, s. lethargy, B 1. p 2. 14; Lytargye, T. i. 730.

Lite, adj. little, I 295; as s., a little, T. i. 291; A. ii. 12. 8, 15. 5; adv. little, T. iv. 1330. See Lyte.

Litel, adj. little, 1. 38; A 87, 438, 490, B 73, 1190; l. of, small in, deficient in, 5. 513; into l., within a little, very nearly, T. iv. 884.

Litestere, s. dyer, 9. 17. From Icel. litr, colour, dye; lita, to dye.

Lith, s. limb (viz. of herself), B 4065; limb, 3. 953. A.S. lið.

Litherly, adv. ill, A 3299. A.S. lȳðer, evil.

Liven, v. live, A 506, E 109; ger. 3. 17; A 335; Livestow, livest thou, C 719; Liveth, pr. s. A 1028; Liveden, pt. pl. lived, D 1877; Livinge, pres. pt. living, 22. 2, 52.

Livere (1), s. liver, D 1839.

Livere (2), s. liver (one who lives), B 1024.

Liveree, s. livery, A 363.

Livinge, s. life-time, 7. 188; manner of life, C 107; state of life, G 322; Lyvinge, C 847.

Lixt, liest; see Lye (2).

Lo, interj. lo! 1. 15, 18; A 3017; T. i. 302, 399, 469, 480, 514, 1049, &c. (Very common).

Lode (lòòdə), s. load, A 2918.

Lodemenage, s. pilotage, A 403. 'Lodemanage is the hire of a pilot, for conducting a ship from one place to another': Cowel, Law Dict.

Lodesmen, s. pl. pilots, L. 1488. See note.

Lode-sterre, s. polar star, lodestar, T. v. 232, 1392; A 2059; 26. 12 (see vol. iv. p. xxix).

Lofte, dat. loft, upper room, L. 2709; on lofte, in the air, HF. 1727; aloft, B 277.

Logge, s. lodge, resting-place, B 4043.

Logging, s. lodging, B 4185.

Logik, s. logic, A 286.

Loke, s.; see Look.

Loke, v. (weak) lock up, D 317.

Loken, pp. enlocked, locked up, B 4065. Pp. of the strong verb louken, A.S. lūcan.

Loken, ger. to look, R. 1640; A 1783; to see, B 3. p 12. 62; v. behold, R. 812; Looketh, pr. s. considers, B 5. p 4. 135; Loke, 2 pr. s. subj. regard, B 5. p 6. 171; pr. s. subj. looks, R. 1605; Loked, pt. s. looked, A 289, E 340; R. 291; 3. 558; Lokeden, pt. pl. L. 1972; Loked, pp. contemplated, B 2. p 5. 6; discerned, B 4. p 6. 59; Loke, imp. s. see, HF. 893; T. i. 890; take heed, D 1587; Loke he, let him take heed, I 134; Loketh, imp. pl. L. 1883; look ye, behold, G 1329; search ye, C 578. A.S. lōcian.

Loking, s. look, gaze, 3. 870; T. v. 1820; countenance, B 2332; look, glance, 3. 874; L. 240; glance (of the eye), A 2171; aspect, 4. 51; A 2469, E 514; examining, 5. 110; appearance, R. 290; glances, looks, F 285; Lokinge, power of vision, B 4. p 4. 132; Lookinge, gaze, B 1. p 3. 4.

Lokkes, pl. locks of hair, A 81, 677; 8. 3. A.S. locc.

Loller, s. a loller, a lollard, B 1173. On the confusion of these terms, see the note. Cf. Icel. lulla, to loll about; lullari, a sluggard.

Lomb, s. lamb, L. 1798; B 617. See Lamb.

Lond, s. land, A 194, 400, 579; B 127, 3225; country, B 3548; upon lond, in the country, A 702; Londe, dat. land, 7. 194; B 522, 2077, G 950.

Lone (lòònə), s. dat. loan, B 1485; gift, grace, D 1861. The nom. form is lòòn.

Long, prep.; the phrase wher-on ... long = long on wher, along of what, G 930; Long on, along of, because of, G 922. A.S. gelang, because of.

Long, adj. (before a vowel), tall, R. 817; Longe, 3. 380; A 784; def.. 6. I; A 354, I 139; Longe, adj. pl. tall, high, R. 1384; long, A. i. 7. 6; A 93, D 953, 976; high, 5. 230.

Longe, adv. long, 3. 217; 4. 172; T. ii. 402; HF. 1506; A 286, D 966, F 763; at great length, B 5. p 4. 5; for a long time, 3. 20; L. 2261; A 2084, B 3300, D 9.

Longe (1), v. desire, long for, L. 2260; yearn, T. ii. 546; Longeth, pr. s. L. 2286; Longen, pr. pl. long, wish, A 12; Longed, pt. s. desired, 3. 83; Longen (2), v. belong, A 2278; Longeth, pr. s. belongs, R. 754; 14. 5; HF. 244; A 2791, C 109, E 285, F 16; (it) concerns, T. 11. 312; Longen, pr. pl. belong, F 1131; Longeth, pr. pl. belong, L. 151; Longed, pt. s. befitted, R. 1222; Longing, pres. pt. belonging (to), L. 1963; Longinge, A 3209; Longing for, i.e. belonging to, suitable for, F 39.

Longes, pl. lungs, A 2752.

Longitude, s. the distance between two given meridians, A ii. 39. 12; the length or extent of a 'climate,' in a direction parallel to the equator, or rather a line along which to measure this length; A. ii. 39. 18; Longitudes, pl. longitudes, A. pr. 58. The longitude of a star is measured along the zodiac; that of a town, from a fixed meridian.

Look, s. look, glance, 3. 840; A 3342; Loke, HF. 658; dat. L. 1605.

Looketh, pr. s. beholds, considers, B 5. p 4. 135. See Loken.

Lookinge, s. gaze, B 1. p 3. 4. See Loking.

Loos (lòòs), s. praise, renown, R. 1161; HF. 1621, 1626, 1722, 1817, 1900; B 2834, 3036, G 1368. O. F. los. See Los (2).

Loos (lóós), adj. loose, 5. 570; A 4064, 4138, 4352; Lous, free, HF. 1286. See Laus.

Looth (lòòth), adj. loath, odious, A 486, 1837, F 1519, 1599, H 145; hateful, A 3393; T. iii. 732; full of dislike, B 2. p 4. 28; me were l., it would displease me, B 91; as s., what is hateful, misery, L. 1639. See Loth. A.S. lāð.

Looth, adv. with dislike, T. ii. 1234.

Loothly, adj. hideous, D 1100.

Loppe, s. a spider, A. i. 3. 4, 19. 2. A.S. lobbe, a spider.

Loppewebbe, s. cobweb, A. i. 21. 2. See Loppe.

Lord, s. lord, A 65, 172, 355, 580; Lordes, gen. A 47, D 1151; Lordes sone, the son of the lord, R. 1250; Lord, sovereign; 'lord of the assendent,' A. ii. 4. 20; by our lord, pronounced by 'r lord, 3. 651, 690; Lordes, pl. A 943, F 91.

Lorde, v.; Lordeth, pr. s., rules over, 4. 166.

Lordings, s. pl. sirs, C 329, 573, I 15; Lordinges, sirs, my masters, A 761, B 16, 2143, 2212, 2228, 3429, E 1163.

Lordshipe, s. lordship, rank, R. 1176; E 797; power, authority, A 1625, F 743, I 439; rule, B 2706; patronage, T. iii. 76; Lordship, T. iii. 79; Lordshipes, pl. control, B 3. p 4. 3; official powers, B 2666; authorities, I 752, 754, 757; posts of authority, I 441.

Lore (lòòrə), s. teaching, 7. 244; 10. 47, 49; L. 2450; instruction, advice, T. i. 1090; lesson, T. i. 645. 754; ii. 397; teaching, instruction, B 342, G 414; learning, B 761; study, G 842; learning, experience, knowledge, B 4, 1168, E 87, 788; experience, C 70; profit, 5. 15; doctrine, A 527. A.S. lār.

Lore, pp. of Lese.

Lorel, s. wretch, worthless man, abandoned wretch, B 1. p 4. 222; D 273.

Loren, pp. of Lese.

Lorer, s. laurel, R. 1379; Loreres, pl. R. 1313. See Laurer.

Lorn, pp. of Lese.

Los (1), s. loss, 3. 1302; T. iv. 89; L. 997; A 2543, 4186, B 27, 28, F 450; occasion of perdition, D 720.

Los (2), s. praise, renown, fame, L. 1514; report, L. 1424; til her loses, for their praises, in praise of them, HF. 1688. O.F. los. See Loos.

Losengere, s. flatterer, R. 1050; Losengeour, L. 352, B 4516; Losengeres, pl. R. 1056, 1064, 1069. O. F. losengeur.

Losengerie, s. flattery, I 613. (Occurs in P. Plowman.)

Losenges, pl. lozenges, HF. 1317; small diamond-shaped shields, R. 893.

Lost, s. loss, B 2. p 4. 120. See lost in Stratmann.

Loste, pt. s. lost, 3. 75; T. iv. 1151; F 1016; Loste, 1 pt. s. should lose, T. ii. 1749; Losten, 1 pr. pl. lost, A 936; pt. pl. B 4562, G 398; Lost, pp. 1. 152; 3. 703; 15. 7; B 175. From infin. losien.

Lot, s. lot, L. 1933.

Loth (lòòth), adj. loath, 3. 8; displeasing, R. 233; Lothe, pl. loathsome, 3. 581. See Looth.

Lother, adj. comp. more hateful, L. 191.

Lothest, adj. superl. most loath, T. ii. 237; F 1313.

Lotinge, pres. part. lurking, G 186 (see the note). A.S. lutian, to lurk; as in Sweet's A.S. Reader, p. 9, l. 41; from A.S. lūtan, to bow, bend down.

Loud, adj.; Loude, def. loud, F 268.

Loude, adv. loudly, 3. 344, 518; A 171, 672, 714, B 1803, F 55.

Lough; pt. s. of Laughe.

Louke, s. accomplice, A 4415. See note.

Loure, v.; Loured, pp. frowned, HF. 409; Louring, pres. pt. frowning, D 1286.

Lous, adj. loose, free, HF. 1286. See Loos.

Lousy, adj. full of lice, miserable, D 1467.

Loute, v. bow, do obeisance, T. iii. 683; bow, bend, HF. 1704; ger. to bow down, B 3352; Louteth, pr. s. bows down, B 2377; Louted, 1 pt. s. stooped, bent, R. 1554. A.S. lūtan.

Love, s. love, A 475, B 18, 74; fem. lady-love, 4. 31; A 2306, D 1066, F 1440; voc. O my love, A 672; masc. lover, 3. 91; L. 862; Loves, pl. lovers, R. 1317.

Lovedayes, pl. days for settling disputes by arbitration, A 258; HF. 695.

Love-drinke, s. love-potion, D 754.

Love-drury, s. affection, B 2085. The latter part of the word is O. F. drurie, druerie, love, passion; from drut, a lover, which is O. H. G. trút, G. traut, dear, beloved.

Loveknotte, s. love-knot, looped ornament, A 197.

Love-longinge, s. desire, fond affection, A 3349, B 1962.

Love-lykinge, s. love-liking, loving affection, B 2040.

Loven, ger. to love, 4. 48; Lovedest, 2 pt. s. didst love, T. iii. 720; A 1162; Lovede, pt. s. loved, A 97, 166, E 413, 690; Loveden, pt. pl. L. 1812; Loveth, imp. pl. E 370.

Lovere, s. lover, A 1339, F 546; Lovyere, A 80; Loveres, pl. lovers, B 3. m 12. 37; T. iv. 323, B 53, 59; Lovers, 4. 5 (accented both as lóvere and lovére).

Loves, s. pl. loaves, B 503. The sing. is loof.

Lovinge, s. loving, L. 485, 544.

Lovyere, s. lover, A 80. See Lovere.

Lowe (lòòwə), adj. low, L. 1961; A 522; small, 2. 88; contemptible, B 2655; pl. crushed down, A 107; Low, sing. humble, 7. 249. Icel. lāgr.

Lowe, adv. in a low voice, R. 717; 3. 304; F 216; humbly, L. 2046, 2062; as l., as low as possible, 3. 391.

Lowenesse, s. lowliness, I 1080; Lownesse, low level, B 5. m 1. 11.

Lowest, adj. superl. 5. 327.

Lowly, adj. humble, 7. 142; A 99, 250.

Lownesse, s. low level, B 5. m 1. 11. See Lowenesse.

Luce (before a vowel), s. luce, pike, A 350. O. F. lus, luz; Lat. lucius.

Lucre, s. lucre, gain, G 1402; lucre of vilanye = villanous lucre, vile gain, B 1681. F. lucre, Lat. lucrum.

Lufsom, adj. lovely, T. v. 911; lovable, T. v. 465.

Lulle, v.; Lulleth, pr. s. lulls, soothes, B 839; E 1823; Lulled, pt. s. E 553.

Luna, s. the moon, G 826; a name for silver, G 1440. Lat. luna.

Lunárie, s. lunary, moon-wort, G 800. See the note.

Lure, s. a hawk's lure, the bait that tempts them to return to the fowler, D 1340, H 72; Lures, pl. enticements, L. 1371.

Lure, v. lure, entice, D 415.

Lurke, v.; Lurked, pt. s. lay hid, R. 465; Lurkinge, pres. pt. lurking, lying hid, 9. 29; T. iv. 305; Lurking, B 4416.

Lussheburghes, pl. spurious coin, B 3152. See note.

Lust, s. desire, R. 1653; 3. 273; 21. 6; A 1318, B 1307; amusement, R. 1287; pleasure, R. 616; L. 32 a, 1588; A 192, B 3137, D 1876, F 812; joy, A 1250; pleasure, joy, delight, I. 106; 2. 39; 3. 688, 1038; 4. 38; 15. 9; will, desire, wish, 4. 63; B 188, 762, E 658, G 1398; interest in a story, F 402; Luste, dat. pleasure, 5. 15; Lustes, pl. desires, wishes, T. v. 592; B 3667, C 833; things which usually give me pleasure, delights, 3. 581. A.S. lust. See Lest, List.

Luste, v. please; Lusteth, pr. s. impers. (it) pleases, L. 996; Lust, pr. s. pers. pleases, E 1344; impers. (it) pleases, E 322, F 147, H 186; Luste, pt. s. pers. desired, G 1344; Luste, pt. s. impers. it pleased, 3. 1019; G 1235. See Lest, List.

Lustier, adj. comp. more joyous, G 1345.

Lustieste, adj. strongest, L. 716.

Lustihede, s. cheerfulness, 3. 27; delight, H 274; enjoyment, F 288; vigour, L. 1530.

Lustily, adv. gaily, merrily, R. 1319; 2. 36; A 1529; joyously, heartily, R. 747; happily, R. 674.

Lustinesse, s. pleasure, jollity, A 1939; vigour, R. 1282; joy, 26. 16 (see vol. iv. p. xxix).

Lusty, adj. pleasant, gay, A 80; pleasant, R. 123, 636; 4. 151; 5. 130; B 1. m 2. 15; E 59, F 52, 142, 389, G 1402; jocund, F 272; lusty, H 41; pleasant, joyous, R. 581; happy, R. 1303; L. 1541; joyful, A 1513; vigorous, L. 1038, 1151, 1193; H 107.

Lute, s. lute, B 2005 n; H 268; Lutes, pl. C 466.

Luxures, s. pl. lusts, B 3. p 7. 7.

Luxurie, s. lechery, B 925, C 484.

Ly, imp. s. of Lye (1).

Lyard, adj. grey, D 1563. O. F. liard.

Lycorys, s. liquorice, A 3690, B 1951, 2045.

Lye, s. lie, contradiction, L. 1882; HF. 292, A 3015; Lyes, pl. T. iv. 1407; HF. 1477, 2129.

Lye (1), v. lie, remain, 10. 52; Lye, ger. to lodge, D 1780; Lye ... by, v. lie beside, B 3470; Lye upright, lie on one's back, lie dead, R. 1604; Lyst, 2 pr. s. T. ii. 991; Lystow, thou liest, T. iv. 394; H 276; Lyest, 2 pr. s. liest still, T. i. 797; Lye, 2 pr. pl. recline, 4. 5; Lyth, pr. s. lies, is, remains, R. 782, 1615, 1618; lies, 3. 146, 181, 589; 4. 184; 5. 573; A 1218, 3023, B 2847, F 1337; (he) lies, B 634; (that) lies, D 1829; remains, resides, B 5. m 4. 17; B 3654, F 35, 322; lies (dead), 3. 143; Lyth therto, belongs here, is needed, 3. 527; Lay, 1 pt. s. lodged, A 20; Lay, pt. s. remained, was, A 538; R. 1480; lay, B 3630, F 467; Lay by, lay with, D 1357; Layen, pt. pl. lay, T. iii. 745; Laye, pt. pl. 3. 166; Laye, pt. s. subj. would lie, T. iv. 1560; Ly, imp. s. T. ii. 953. See Liggen.

Lye (2), v. tell lies, lie, L. 58; A 763; ger. 10. 22; Lyen, v. T. ii. 324; D 228; ger. 3. 631, 812; Lye, 1 pr. s. lie, tell lies, R. 1072; T. ii. 300; Lixt, 2 pr. s. liest, D 1618, 1761; Ley, strong pt. s. lied, T. ii. 1077; Leigh, T. ii. 1077 n; Lyed, weak pt. s. lied, A 659; T. ii. 1077 n; Lyeden, pt. pl. B 1. p 4. 180. A.S. lēogan.

Lye (3), v. blaze, D 1142. A.S. lȳge, lēge, s. flame.

Lyer, s. liar, B 2256; Lyere, T. iii. 309, 315; Lyeres, pl. B 2498.

Lyes, s. pl. lees, dregs, HF. 2130. F. lie, 'the lees, dregs': Cotgrave. See below.

Lyes, pl. (1) lees; or (2) lies, D 302. Perhaps a double meaning is intended. See Lye in Prompt. Parv.

Lyf, s. life, 1. 72; A 71, 2776; Lyves, gen. life's, 6. 60; 19. 15; E 308; of my life, 3. 920; Our present worldes lyves space, the space of our present life in the world, 5. 53; Lyves day, lifetime, L. 1624; Lyves space, lifetime, 26. 47 (see vol. iv. p. xxxi); Lyve, dat. 3. 1278; L. 59; On lyve, alive, L. 1792; T. iv. 296; D 5; in his time, D 43; Upon lyve, alive, T. ii. 1030; Of lyve, out of life, T. v. 1561; Bringe of lyve, cause to die, T. ii. 1608; My lyve, in my life, T. ii. 205; Of my lyve, in my life, 26. 48 (see vol. iv. p. xxxi); By thy lyf, during thy life, B 1621; Thy lyf, during thy lifetime, 17. 19; His lyve, in his life, T. v. 165, 436; L. 1099; His lyf, during his life, B 3369, E 1731; Hir lyve, in their life, D 392; Lyves, pl. B 3284, F 233; Lyves, gen pl. souls', lives', G 56. And see Lyves, adv.

Lyflode, s. means of living, I 685. Mod. E. livelihood.

Lyfly, adj. vivid, bright, B 1. p 5; lively, B 4. p 6. 15.

Lyfly, adv. in a lifelike way, A 2087; Lyvely, 3. 905.

Lyk, adj. like, 4. 237; A 259, 590, 1301, B 3361, F 207; alike, 15. 5; Lyke, pl. 12. 4.

Lyke, v. please, 22. 8; T. i. 431; ger. T. i. 289; HF. 860; to be liked, R. 1357; Lyken, v. (to) please, 6. 127; B 2128, E 506; ger. T. iii. 613; Lyketh, pr. s. pleases, E 1031; impers. (it) pleases, E 311, 845; us l. yow, it pleases us with respect to you, E 106; Lyke, pr. s. subj. may please, D 1278; may be pleasing, 1. 139; please, L. 319; thee l. nat, it may not please you, L. 490; Lyked, pt. s. impers. pleased, R. 1312; 7. 109, 112; T. ii. 1266; A. i. 10. 7; Lykede, pt. s. pleased, R. 27, 806; B 4. p 6. 160; Lykinge, pres. pt. T. i. 309.

Lyker, adj. more like, T. iii. 1028; D 1925.

Lyking, s. pleasure, R. 76; C 455; D 1256; delight, B 3499; Lykinge, delight, 7. 75.

Lyking, adj. pleasing, R. 868; pleasant, R. 1416; thriving, R. 1564.

Lyklihed, s. dat. likelihood, E 448; Lyklihede, dat. B 1786.

Lyklinesse, s. probability, 22. 15; E 396.

Lykly, adj. likely, like, 16. 32; T. iii. 1270; A 1172, C 64.

Lykne, 1 pr. s. compare, 3. 636; Lykned, pp. likened, A 180; compared, B 1. p 4. 93 (see note); B 91. Cf. Swed. likna.

Lyknesse, s. parable, A 2842.

Lym, s. lime, F 1149, G 806, 910; quicklime, L. 649; Lyme (before a vowel), L. 765. A.S. līm.

Lymaille, s. filings of any metal, G 1162, 1197; Lymail, G 1164, 1267, 1269; Limaille, G 853.

Lyme, ger. to lime, to cover with birdlime, T. i. 353.

Lymere, s. hound held in leash, 3. 365; Lymeres, pl. 3. 362.

Lymrod, s. lime-rod, lime-twig, B 3574.

Lyne, s. line, T. i. 1068, ii. 1461; line, cord, A. ii. 23. 27; fishing-line, 4. 242; T. v. 777; lineage, line of descent, 19. 23; D 1135; as lyne right, straight as a line, T. iii. 228.

Lyned, pp. lined, A 440.

Lyne-right, adj. in an exact line, exactly in a line with, A. i. 21. 19; A. ii. 23. 2. See Lyne.

Lynx, s. lynx, B 3. p 8. 30.

Lyoun, s. lion, T. iii. 1780; v. 830; Lyouns, pl. R. 894. See Leoun.

Lyst, 2 pr. s. liest, reclinest, T. ii. 991; Lystow, liest thou, T. iv. 394; H 276. See Lye (1).

Lytargye, s. lethargy, T. i. 730; Litargie, B 1. p 2. 14.

Lyte, adj. small, little, R. 532; 5. 64; 7. 107; L. 495, 740, 2495; A. pr. 20; B 109, 2153, D 1600, F 565; slight, I 689; Lyte, s. a little, T. ii. 384; L. 29, 535; 3. 249; 5. 28; HF. 621; A 1334, B 352; Lyte, pl. little, A 494, 1193; 5. 350; L. 219; small, T. iii. 1250. See Lite.

Lyte, adv. little, 3. 884; 7. 200; L. 421; a little, E 935; in a small degree, G 632, 699; l. and l., by little and little, D 2235.

Lyth, lies; see Lye (1).

Lythe, adj. easy, soft, HF. 118. A.S. līðe.

Lythe, ger. to alleviate, cheer, T. iv. 754. See above.

Lyve; see Lyf.

Lyvely, adv. in a lively way, 3. 905. See Lyfly.

Lyves; see Lyf.

Lyves, adv. in life; hence, as adj. living, alive, T. iv. 252, 767; HF. 1063; A 2395, E 903, 1864; no lyves creature, no living creature, T. iii. 13. So in Havelok, 509; P. Plowm. B. xix. 154; C. xxii. 159; &c.

Lyvinge, s. manner of life, C 847; state of life, G 322. See Livinge.

 

M', sometimes put for Me (before a vowel); as in masterte, mathinketh, mexcuse.

Ma dame, my lady, T. ii. 880. See Madame.

Ma fey, my faith! T. iii. 52.

Maad; pp. of Make.

Maat, adj. dejected, B 2. p 4. 29. (E. mate in check-mate.) See Mat.

Mace, s. mace, club, A 2124; B 2003; Maces, pl. A 2559, 2611; T. ii. 44, 640.

Mad, adj. mad, T. ii. 113; iv. 393; A 4231, F 1511; Madde, pl. T. v. 206.

Mad, pp. made, L. 286. See Make.

Madame, s. madam, 12. 1; 21. 1; A 121; F 378; ma dame, A 376; Ma dame, T. ii. 880.

Madde, v. go mad, 4. 253; ger. to be furious, T. i. 479; 1 pr. s. am mad, R. 1072; 2 pr. s. subj. art mad, A 3156; pr. s. subj. A 5559.

Made, pt. s. of Make.

Mader, s. madder, 9. 17.

Magestee, s. majesty, R. 1339; 14. 19; B 1082, 3334, 3505, 3862, D 824. And see Maiestee.

Magicien, s. magician, B 3397, F 1184; Magiciens, pl. HF. 1260.

Magik, s. magic, A 416, F 1202; M. naturel, natural magic, F 1125; Magyk, F 218; Magyke (read magyk?), HF. 1266.

Magistrat, s. magistracy, B 3. p 4. 16.

Magnanimitee, s. magnanimity, I 731.

Magnesia, s. magnesia, G 1455. Lat. magnesia, so called because found in Magnesia, in Thessaly.

Magnificence, s. great well-doing, I 736; grandeur, E 815.

Magnifyed, pp. magnified, I 408.

Magnifying, s. HF. 306.

Magyk, -e; see Magik.

Maheym, s. maim, maiming, I 625. Mod. E. maim.

Maidenhede; see Maydenheed.

Maille, s. mail, ringed armour, E 1202; Mayle, T. v. 1559. F. maille, a mesh, Lat. macula.

Maister, s. master, B 1627, F 1202; doctor, D 2184; doctor (of divinity), D 1638; (as a term of address) 17. 1; one in authority, A 261; maister tour, principal tower, F 226; Maistres, gen. master's, F 1220; pl. A 576, B 141; Maystres, pl. B 3. m 2. 8.

Maisterful, adj. masterful, T. ii. 756.

Maister-strete, s. chief street, main street, L. 1965, 2305; A 2902.

Maister-temple, s. chief temple, L. 1016.

Maister-toun, s. capital, chief town, L. 1591.

Maister-tour, s. chief tower, F 226.

Maistow, mayest thou, HF. 699; A. ii. 2. 6; A 1236. See Mowen.

Maistresse, s. mistress, I. 109, 140; 3. 797; 4. 33; L. 88; T. ii. 98; F 374; governess, C 106; Maistresses, pl. governesses, C 72.

Maistrye, s. mastery, great skill, R. 1208; A 3383; mastery, F 747, 764; control, B 3689, C 58; superiority; for the maistrye, as regards authority, A 165; victory, B 3582; specimen of skill, HF. 1074; art, elegance, R. 842; Maistrie, mastery, B 2248, D 818; a masterly operation (cf. F. coup de mâitre), G 1060. O. F. maistrie. See Maystrie.

Maiestee, s.; his real maiestee = his royal majesty, i.e. high treason, B 1. p 4. 105, 156 (see note). See Magestee.

Make, s. mate, 4. 17, 154; 5. 310, 371, 466, 587, 631, 657; L. 141; D 270, H 186; equal, match, HF. 1172; A 2556; wedded companion, wife, B 700, 1982, E 1289; bride, E 1882; husband, D 85, G 224; Makes, pl. mates, 5, 389; L. 158. A.S. maca, gemaca.

Make, v. make, A 184; compose, make up, write, 3. 782; L. 69, 364; B 96; ger. to compose, to write (about), R. 41; Maken, v. L. 437; Make, v. pretend to, counterfeit, T. ii. 1522; Make, 1 pr. s. write, L. 188; pr. s. subj. may cause, L. 34 a; cause (it), T. ii. 959; Makestow, 2 pr. s. B 371; Maketh, pr. s. causes, A 3035; D 1833, 1884; Make, pr. pl. compose (poetry), 18. 82; Maken, pr. pl. make, utter, A 9; Maked, pt. s. made, A 526, B 3318, 3690, D 1642, F 1000; Made, 1 pt. s. made, A 33; Made, 2 pr. s. madest, L. 538; pt. s. composed, B 57; hit m., caused it, HF. 1159; Made(n), pt. pl. made, 3. 510, B 3523; Makeden, pt. pl. T. iv. 121; Made, pt. s. subj. may have made, 4. 227; Made ... broght, caused to be brought, HF. 155; Maked, pp. made, 3. 578; A 1247, B 1722, 1727, 2445, G 484, I 149; composed, 5. 677; Maad, pp. made, 9. 60; T. i. 251, 553; A 394, 668, B 3607, F 222, G 1459; Mad, pp. 3. 415; 4. 278.

Makelees, adj. peerless, T. i. 172. See Make, s.

Maker, s. author, composer, T. v. 1787.

Making, s. poetry, composition, 8. 4; T. v. 1789; L. 74, 413, 483.

Maladye, s. malady, A 419, 1373; Maladie, I 423; Maladyes, pl. A 2467, B 2467.

Malapert, adj. forward, T. iii. 87.

Male (1), s. bag, wallet, A 694, 3115, C 920, G 566, I 26. O. F. male.

Male (2), s. male, D 122.

Malefice, s. evil practices, unlawful arts, B 1. p 4. 196; evil contrivance, I 341.

Maléncolye, s. melancholy, T. v. 360; B 4123; Meláncolye, 3. 23.

Maléncolyk, adj. melancholy, A 1375.

Malgre, prep. in spite of, 4. 220. See Maugre.

Malice, s. malice, spite, 3. 794, 993; Malis, T. iii. 1155.

Málicióus, adj. evil, HF. 93.

Malignitee, s. malignity, I 513.

Malison, s. curse, I 443; Malisoun, G 1245; cursing, I 619.

Malliable, adj. malleable, such as can be worked by the hammer, G 1130.

Malone, for Me alone, T. i. 1028 n, ii. 1401 n.

Malt, s. A 3988, 3991, D 1746.

Malt, pt. s. melted, T. i. 582; HF. 922. See Melte.

Maltalent, s. ill-will, ill-humour, resentment, R. 273, 330. O. F. mal talent.

Man, s. A 167, 209, 223; (used indefinitely) one, B 43, D 2002; hero, B 3331; servant, I 772; Mannes, gen. A 574, B 1630; of mankind, T. ii. 417; Men, pl. men, people, 18. 26; A 178; sing. (unemphatic form of man), one (with sing. verb), A 149, 232, C 675, G 392; T. iv. 866; 5. 22 (see note); Mennes, gen. pl. 3. 976; B 202.

Manace, s. threat, menace, A 2003, B 3789, I 646; Manaces, pl. B 1. m 4. 4; B 2. p 1. 65.

Manace, ger. to threaten, E 1752; Manaceth, pr. s. menaces, E 122, I 646; Manaced, pt. s. B 2694; Manasinge, pres. pt. threatening, B 2. m 4. 3; B 4. m 2. 4.

Manasinge, s. threatening, A 2035.

Mandement, s. summons, D 1346, 1360; Mandements, pl. D 1284.

Maner, s. manor, place to dwell in, 3. 1004.

Manere (accented manérə), s. manner, 1. 29; A 858, D 1229; deportment, A 140; method, B 5. p 1. 21; disposition, L. 251; manner, way, 3. 1130; B 3706, E 781; ease of behaviour, 3. 1218; goodly courtesy of manner, 4. 294; of manere, in his behaviour, F 546; Maner (accented máner), way, 3. 433; method, B 5. p 6. 203; manner, kind, sort (used without of following), as in maner doctrine, B 1689; cf. 3. 471, 840; 4. 116; 7. 114; A. i. 2. 1, 19. 1; A 71, B 519, 1689, 2386, 3951, C 627, D 1266, E 519, 605, F 329, G 424, 527, I 103; Maneres, pl. ways, B 1. p 4. 198; kinds, R. 1406; I 82, 103; kinds (of creatures), B 4. m 3. 7; methods, disposition, B 2. p 2. 36; Maners, pl. manners, 3. 1014.

Manhede, s. manliness, A 1285; Manhod, A 756; manhood, 18. 4.

Manifesten, ger. to display, B 2. P 7. 31.

Mankinde, s. mankind, 1. 107, 168; 5. 70; the race of men, A 1307, F 876, 877.

Manly, adj. manly, 7. 259; A 167; noble, B 3901.

Manly, adv. in a manly way, boldly, A 987, T. iv. 622.

Mannes, gen. of mankind, T. ii. 417. See Man.

Mannish, adj. manlike, T. i. 284; human, B 2454; unwomanly, B 782.

Mannish, adv. like a man, boisterously, E 1536.

Mansioun, s. dwelling, A 1974; (a term in astrology), F 50 (see note); mansion (of the moon), F 1285; Mansiouns, pl. daily positions or 'stations' of the moon, F 1130.

Manslauhtre, s. manslaughter, 9. 64; Manslaughtre, C 593, I 564.

Mansuete, adj. courteous, T. v. 194.

Mansuetude, s. meekness, I 654.

Mantel, s. mantle, cloak, R. 224, 459; T. ii. 380; A 378, B 3904.

Mantelet, s. short mantle, A 2163.

Many, adj. many; Many a, A 168; Many oon, Many a one, A 317.

Manye, s. mania, A 1374.

Many-fold, numerous, 20. 1.

Mappemounde, map of the world, 12. 2. F. mappemonde (Cotgrave).

Mapul, s. maple-tree, A 2923; Maples, pl. R. 1384.

Marbel, s. marble, T. i. 700; A 1893; Marbul, F 500.

Marble-stoon, s. marble-stone, piece of marble, R. 1462; Marbul-stones, pl. blocks of marble, B 1871.

Marchal, s. marshal, E 1930. See Marshal.

Marchandyse, s. merchandise, barter, I 777.

Marchant, s. merchant, 9. 22; A 270, B 132, I 777; Marchaunts, pl. B 122.

Marcial, adj. warlike, T. iv. 1669.

Marcien, adj. devoted to Mars, D 610.

Mare, s.; see Mere.

Mareys, s. marsh, D 970; Mareys, pl. marshes, B 2. p 7. 26; B 3. p 11. 76.

Margaretes, pl. pearls, B 3. m 10. 12 n.

Margin, edge, A. i. 21. 6.

Mariage, s. marriage, A 212, 3095, D 3.

Marie, interj. marry, i.e. by St. Mary, G 1062.

Maried, pt. s. trans. (he) caused to be married, E 1130.

Marineer, s. mariner, B 1627; Marineres, pl. B 4. m 3. 16; Mariners, L. 2169.

Mark (1), s. mark, fixed spot, L. 784; Marke (read Mark), A. ii. 43 a. 3 (p. 231); sex, race, D 696; sign, I 98; Merk, image, F 880.

Mark (2), s. a piece of money, of the value of 13s. 4d. in England, G 1026; pl. Mark, i.e. marks, C 390. See note to C 390.

Marke, v.; Markede, pt. s. marked, B 4. m 7. 39.

Market, s. D 2188.

Market-beter, s. swaggerer in a market (see note), A 3936.

Market-place, s. E 1583.

Markis, s. a marquis, E 64; gen. sing. marquis's, 994. F. marchis, Low Lat. marchensis, a governor of the marches or frontiers.

Markisesse, s. a marchioness, E 283, 394, 942, 1014.

Marle-pit, s. marl-pit, A 3460. (Trisyllabic.)

Marshal, s. marshal of the hall, A 752; Marchal, marshal, E 1930.

Martir, s. martyr, A 17; T. iv. 623.

Martirdom, s. martyrdom, E 2283; torment, A 1460.

Martyre, s. martyrdom, T. iv. 818.

Martyre, v.; Martýreth, pr. s. torments, A 1562.

Mary-bones, s. pl. marrow-bones, A 380.

Marye, s. marrow, pith, B 3. p 11. 86; Mary, C 542; Maryes, s. pl. marrows, pith, B 3. p 11. 84.

Masculin, adj. male, B 2. p 3. 28.

Mase, s. maze, labyrinth, L. 2014; bewilderment, T. v. 468; bewildering position, B 4283.

Mased, adj. bewildered, 3. 12; B 526, 678; stunned with grief, 7. 322. See Maze.

Masednesse, s. amaze, E 1061.

Maselyn, s. a bowl made of maple-wood, B 2042. O. F maselin, maserin, maderin; from O. F. madre, mazre, a mazer, or bowl of maple-wood. See Godefroy.

Masonrye, s. masonry, R. 302; Masoneries, pl. HF. 1303.

Masse, s. mass, 3. 928; T. iii. 88; D 1728, E 1894; Messe, B 1413.

Massedayes, pl. massdays, B 4041.

Masse-peny, s. penny for a mass, D 1749.

Mast (1) s. mast (of a ship), 3. 71; 7. 314; L. 643; A 3264, 3532.

Mast (2), s. mast, i.e. the fruit of forest-trees, acorns and beech-nuts, 9. 7, 37.

Masterte, for Me asterte, T. i. 1050 n; v. 1343 n.

Masty, adj. fattened, sluggish, H F. 1777. Lit. 'fattened on mast'; see Mast (2).

Mat, adj. dejected, A 955; exhausted, T. iv. 342; dead, L. 126; defeated utterly, B 935. See below; and see Maat.

Mate, interj. checkmate! 3. 660; adj. exhausted, 7. 176. O.F. mat, Arab, māt, dead (in chess).

Matére, s. matter, affair, subject, business, 3. 43; L. 365, 270 a; A 727, 1259, B 322, 411, 581, 1703, 2148, D 910, E 90, 1175; theme, 5. 26; material, B 1. p 1. 15; I 137; cause, B 4. p 7. 60; reason, B 3054; Mátere, matter, L. 1582; Materes, pl. materials (of a solid character), G 779; Matires, gen. pl. of the materials, G 770. See Matiere.

Material, adj. material, I 182; as s., material, matter, B 5. p 1. 35.

Mathinketh, for Me athinketh, pr. s. it repents me, I am sorry, A 3170 n.

Matiere, for Matere, B 2209 n, 2221 n; A. ii. 4. 37. See Matere.

Matins, pl. morning-prayers, D 876.

Matrimoine, s. matrimony, A 3095, E 1573; Matrimoyne, I 882.

Maugre, Maugree, in spite of; as in maugre al thy might, A 1607; maugree hir eyen two, A 1796; maugree thyne yën, D 315; m. hem, B 3. p 3. 44, 47, 51; m. her, L. 1772; m. Philìstiens, B 3238; m. my heed, in spite of all I can do, 3. 1201; m. thyn heed, B 104; m. his heed, A 1169; m. her (hir) heed, L. 2326, D 887; m. your heed, in spite of your heads, in spite of all you can do, B 4602; Malgre, 4. 220.

Maumet, s. idol, I 860; Mawmet, I 749. See below.

Maumetrye, s. Mahometanism, B 236; Mawmetrye, idolatry, I 750. Maumet is a corruption of Mahomet or Muhammed.

Maunciple, s. manciple, A 544, 567, 3993; H 25, 69, 103, I 1. An officer who purchases victuals for an inn or college.

Mavis, s. song-thrush, R. 619; Mavys, pl. R. 665.

Mavise, for Me avyse, T. ii. 276 n.

Mawe, s. maw, stomach, B 486, 1190, 2013.

May, may; see Mowen.

May, s. maiden, T. v. 1720; B 851. See mæi in Stratmann.

Mayden, s. maiden, R. 586; Mayde, maid, 1. 49; A 69, B 1636, 1932, D 886, 1026, E 257, 377, 446, 779; waiting-woman, F 1487; Mayde child, girl, B 1285; Maydens, pl. T. ii. 119. Mayde is a shorter form of mayden.

Maydenheed, s. maidenhood, virginity, D 888; Maidenhed, L. 294 a; Maydenhod, B 3459; Maydenhede, 1. 91; A 2329, B 30, D 64, 69, F 1376, G 126, I 868.

Mayle, s. mail-armour, T. v. 1559. See Maille.

Mayme, v. injure, D 1132.

Mayntene, v. maintain, R. 1144; uphold, A 1778; ger. A 1441; pr. s. subj. E 1171.

Mayst, mayest; see Mowen.

Mayster-hunte, s. chief huntsman, the huntsman, 3. 375. See Hunte.

Maystow; see Mowen.

Maystres, s. pl. masters, B 3. m 2. 8. See Maister.

Maystrie, s. masterly act; No maystrie, an easy matter, L. 400; Maystrye, s. mastery, 10. 14. See Maistrye.

Maze, 2 pr. pl. are in a state of bewilderment, E 2387. See Mased.

Me, dat. to me, A 39; acc. me, D 1360, &c. Sometimes elided, as in masterte, for me asterte.

Mechel, adj. much; for as mechel, for as much, A. pr, 4. See Mochel, Muchel.

Mede (1), s. mead (drink), A 2279 n, B 2042. See Meeth.

Mede (mèèdə), s. (2), mead, meadow, R. 132, 1434; 5. 184; HF. 1353; T. ii. 53; L. 41, 47; A 89, D 861, F 724, 1147; Medew, L. 210.

Mede, s.; see Meed.

Medelen, v.; Medeleth, pr. s. mingles, L. 874. See Medle.

Medeling, s. admixture, B 1. p 4. 179.

Medewe, s. meadow, R. 128; Medew, L. 210.

Mediacion, s. means, help, A. pr. 8, ii. 26. 18; Mediacioun, use, A. i. 13. 4.

Mediatours, s. pl. go-betweens, I 967.

Medicyne, s. medicine, healing, i. 78; T. i. 659; Medecyne, remedy, 7. 244.

Medle, v. mingle, HF. 2102; meddle, take part in, G 1184; dye (miscere), B 2. m 5. 7; Medly, v. mingle, mix, B 2. m 5. 5; Medleth, pr. s. mixes, B 4. m 3. 4; stirs up, B 1. m 7. 3; mingles, B 3. m 10. 11; Medeleth, pr. s. L. 874; Medled, pp. mingled, T. iv. 339; mixed, I 122; Medleth, imp. pl. meddle, G 1424.

Medlee, adj. of a mixed colour, A 328.

Medlers, pl. medlars, R. 1375.

Medling, s. meddling, T. iv. 167; blending, R. 898; Medlinge, admixture, B 4. p 4. 75.

Meed (mééd), s. reward, L. 1662; Méde, meed, reward, 13. 27; A 770; a bribe, A 3380, B 3579, C 133, I 167; Bribery, 5. 228; 15. 6; Medes, pl.; to medes, for my meed, for my reward, T. ii. 1201.

Meek, adj. meek, 7. 200; Meke (dissyllabic), A 3202, B 1432, D 434; def. E 141; pl. 5. 341; D 1259.

Meel, s. meal (repast), B 466, 4023, D 1774; Meles, pl. 3. 612.

Meel-tyd, s. meal-time, T. ii. 1556.

Meeth (mèèth), s. mead, A 3261, 3378; Meth, A 2279. See Mede (1).

Megre, adj. meagre, thin, R. 218, 311.

Meignee, Meinee; see Meynee.

Meke; see Meek.

Meke, v. make meek; Meke, 1 pr. s. humble, B 2874.

Meke, adv. meekly, 7. 267.

Mekely, adv. meekly, C 714.

Mekenesse, s. mildness, mercy, B 4. p 4. 108.

Meker, adj. comp. meeker, L. 2198.

Mekeste, adj. superl. meekest, E 1552.

Melancolious (accented mélancólious), adj. melancholy, HF. 30. So accented in O. F.; see examples in Godefroy.

Meláncolýe, s. melancholy, 3. 23. See Malencolye.

Mele (mèlə), s. meal (of flour), A 3995, 4245, D 1739.

Meles, pl. of Meel.

Melle, s. mill, 9. 6, A 3923, 4242; Mille, E 1200.

Melodious, adj. T. v. 577.

Melodye, s. melody, 1. 100; 5. 60, 62; A 9, E 271.

Melte, v. melt, T. iv. 367; Melteth, pr. s. (pron. melt'th or melt), R. 276; Malt, pt. s. T. i. 582; HF. 922; Molte, pp. T. v. 10; HF. 1145, 1149.

Membre, s. limb, R. 1028; member, 3. 495; Membres, pl. I 137; parts, A. pr. 48.

Memorial, adj. which serves to record events, 7. 18.

Memórie, s. memory, 7. 14; L. 1889; G 339; remembrance, A 3112, B 3164; Memóire, recollection, 3. 945.

Men, pl. of Man; also a weakened form of Man, in the sense of 'one,' or 'some one'; used with a singular verb; A 149, 1524, &c.; see Man.

Mena, error for Mene, I 11 n.

Mencioun, s. mention, 5. 29; A 893, B 3311, H 106; made of m., made mention of, B 54.

Mende, v. mend, T. v. 1426; 2 pr. pl. profit, gain, T. ii. 329.

Mendinants, pl. mendicant friars, D 1907, 1912. See note.

Mendite, for Me endyte, G 32 n.

Mene, adj. middle, B 3. m 9. 18; mean, A. ii. 44. 14 (see Mote); mene whyle, mean while, T. iii. 50; B 546, G 1262; of middle size, T. v. 806; Mene, adj. pl. intermediate, 7. 286.

Mene (mèènə), s. means, way, 11. 36; T. v. 104, 1551; middle course, B 4. p 7. 69; T. i. 689; instrument, E 1671; mediator, 1. 125; go-between, T. iii. 254; intermediary, I 990; the mean, L. 165; Menes, pl. mediators, go-betweens, A 3375; means, B 480; means, instruments, D 1484, F 883, 884.

Meneliche, adj. moderate, B 1. p 6. 77.

Menen (mèènən), ger. to say, HF. 1104; Mene, ger. to signify, B 3941; Mene, 1 pr. s. intend, mean, 11. 31; L. 166, 558; A 793, 1673, B 93, 641, 1860, 2141, G 1424, I 11; Menest, 2 pr. s. meanest, 3. 743, 1137, 1305; Menestow, meanest thou, G 309; Mente, 1 pt. s. meant, intended, B 4614, G 999, 1051; purposed, 18. 50; Mente, pt. s. R. 1285, T. iii. 432; B 327, F 108, 522; L. 309; thought, 5. 581; declared, 7. 160; 2 pt. pl. meant, F 981; Meneden, pt. pl. B 5. p 1. 33; Ment, pp. intended, 5. 158.

Mene-whyle, mean time, D 1445. See Mene, adj.

Meninge, s. intention, T. i. 285; L. 474; Mening, intent, F 151.

Menivere, s. miniver, R. 227.

Menstralcies, pl. mintrelsies, HF. 1217. See Minstralcye.

Mente, pt. t. of Menen.

Mentes, pl. plants of mint, R. 731.

Mercenarie, s. hireling, A 514.

Merciable, adj. merciful, 1. 1, 182; 15. 17; L. 347, 410; B 1878, 3013, 3076, F 1036.

Mercúrie, s. mercury, i.e. quicksilver, G 772, 774, 827, 1431, 1438.

Mercy, s. 1. 7; A 918, 2808; (have) mercy, 1. 36; graunt mercy, much thanks, 10. 29; T. iii. 649.

Mere, s. mare, A 541; Mare, A 4055, H 78; Mares, pl. A 4065, 4081.

Meridian, adj. meridional, at the moment of southing, exact southern, A. pr. 60; southern, on the meridian, A. ii. 39. 6.

Meridian, s. meridian, A. ii. 39. 16; Meridians, pl. A. ii. 39. 10.

Meridie, s. midday, A. ii. 44. 30.

Meridional, adj. southern, A. i. 4. 5; F 263 (see Angle); Miridional lyne, the meridian, A. ii. 39. 1.

Merie; see Mery.

Meriely, adv. merrily, A 714; Merily, B 4462; R. 1329.

Merier, adj. pleasanter, sweeter, B 2024, 4041.

Merinesse, s. enjoyment, B 3. p 2. 38.

Merite; see Meryte.

Meritorie, adj. meritorious, I 831.

Merk, s. mark, image, F 880. See Mark.

Merken, v. brand, B 1. p 4. 91.

Merlion, s. merlin, small hawk, 5. 339, 611.

Mermayde, s. mermaid, B 4460; Mermaidenes, pl. mermaids, sirens, B 1. p 1. 49; Mermaydens, sirens, R. 680, 682.

Mersshy, adj. marshy, D 1710.

Merveille, s. marvel, B 2736, E 248, F 1344; Mervaille, E 1186; Mervayle, R. 1571; m. of, wonder at, F 87; Mervayles, pl. marvels, 3. 288; Mervailles, F 660.

Merveillous, adj. marvellous, B 1643, F 1206; Merveyllous, A. ii. 19. 4; Merveilous, R. 1579.

Mervelinge, pres. part. wondering, B 1. m 3. 12.

Mery, adj. merry, gay, R. 580; pleasant, 3. 319; A 235, 757, B 4261; pleasant to hear, B 1186; Merye, pleasant, B 2. m 4. 10; A 208; Merie, glad, E 615; Murye, merry, A 1386; Merie, pl. merry, T. iii. 952, B 126 (= merrily); Meriemen, followers, B 2029.

Merýte, s. recompense, C 277; Merite, deserving, B 4. p 6. 201; Merýtes, pl. merits, T. iv. 965.

Mes; at good mes, at a favourable distance, so as to have a fair shot, R. 1453. O. F. mes. See the note.

Meschaunce, s. misfortune, 18. 47; A 2009, B 914, D 407; evil occurrence, T. i. 92; a miserable condition, B 3204; unfortunate conduct, C 80; ill luck, B 4623; ill luck (to him), B 896, D 2215, H 11; with m., with a mischief, H 193; Meschance, misfortune, B 602, 610; Meschances, pl. misfortunes, evil things, D 367; Meschaunces, pl. evil doings, F 1292.

Meschief, s. misfortune, A 493, B 3513, D 248, E 1454, G 713, 1072; I 810; trouble, mishap, A 2551; Mescheef, harm, L. 1655; H 233; tribulation, trouble, H 76; misfortune, G 1378. See Mischeef.

Mesel, s. leper, I 624. O. F. mesel.

Meselrie, s. leprosy, I 625.

Messáge, s. (1), message, T. iii. 401; errand, B 1087; (2) messenger, B 144, 333; Messáges, pl. messengers, T. ii. 936; B 2986.

Messager, messenger, 3. 153; T. iii. 1417; A 1491, B 6, 724, 785, 3247; Messagere, 3. 133; Messanger, HF. 1568; Messagers, pl. B 2992, 2995, I 967; Messagéres, L. 1091. See Messanger.

Messagerye, s. a sending of messages (personified), 5. 228.

Messaile, for Me asaille, T. iv. 1595 n.

Messanger, s. messenger, HF. 1568, 1583, 1591; Messangeres, pl. 2128. See Messager.

Messe, s. mass, B 1413. See Masse.

Messuage, s. messuage, dwelling-house, A 3979.

Meste, pl. most, i.e. highest in rank, greatest, E 131; at the m., at most, T. v. 947. A.S. mǣst.

Mester, s. service, office, occupation, A 1340. O. F. mester, from Lat. ministerium. See Mister.

Mesurable, adj. moderate, A 435, C 515, F 362; modest, I 936.

Mesurably, adv. moderately, B. 2795.

Mesure, s. moderation, 3. 881; T. ii. 418; E 622, I 465; measure, E 256; measure, plan, 5. 305; by m., not too much, 3. 872; moderately, R. 543 (cf. 823); over m., immeasurably, 5. 300; out of m., immoderately, B 2607; withoute m., beyond measure, 3. 632.

Mesuren, ger. to trace out, B 5. p 1. 15; Mesured, pt. s. measured out, 1. 174.

Mesuring, s. measure, R. 1349.

Met, s. measure of capacity, I 799. A.S. gemet.

Metal, s. 4. 201; 9. 29; B 4. m 7. 25; D 1064; Metál, R. 386; F 243.

Metamorphoseos, gen. s. (the book) of Metamorphosis; it should be pl. Metamorphoseon; B 93.

Mete (méétə), adj. meet, befitting, 3. 316; fit, L. 1043; pl. meet, A 2291. A.S. mǣte (but Ch. has close e).

Mete (méétə), s. equal, 3. 486. See above.

Mete (mètə), s. meat, food, T. i. 485; A 136, 1900; meat, L. 1108; F 173, 618; repast, T. ii. 1462; eating, A 127. A.S. mete.

Mete (méétə), v. meet, 4. 138; L. 148; find, 5. 698; Mete, ger. to meet, L. 634; to meet together, B 1873; Meten, ger. L. 630; Mete, 1 pr. s. 4. 59; R. 1342; Meteth, pr. s. meets (men being singular = one), A 1524; Mette, pt. s. 5. 37; HF. 2069; L. 977; Mette, pt. pl. met, E 390, F 1173, 1508; Metten, pt. pl. HF. 227; Met, pp. met; wel met, D 1443. A.S. mētan.

Mete (méétə), v. dream, T. iii. 1559, iv. 1396, v. 249; ger. 3. 118; 5. 108, 115; Méte, 1 pr. s. dream, T. iii. 1344; am dreaming, 3. 1234; Met, pr. s. 5. 104, 105; Mette, 1 pt. s. dreamt, 5. 95; HF. 110; T. ii. 90; D 577; pt. s. R. 10; HF. 61; T. i. 362, v. 1238; B 3930, 4329; Me mette, 1 pt. s. refl. I dreamt, R. 26; L. 210; pt. s. impers. 3. 276, 442, 1320; HF. 119; refl. A 3684, B 4084; T. ii. 925; Met, pp. B 4445. A.S. mǣtan (but Ch. has close e).

Mete, 1 pr. s. (I) measure, A. ii. 41. 5; imp. s. A. ii. 43. 6. A.S. metan.

Metely, adj. well-proportioned, R. 822.

Meth, s. mead (drink), A 2279. See Meeth.

Meting (1), s. meeting, L. 784.

Meting (2), s. dream, 3. 282.

Metres, pl. metres, L. 562; B 48.

Meve, v. move, stir, T. i. 472; Meve, ger. 5. 150; HF. 825; Meved, pp. HF. 813; to him meved, urged against him, L. 344. See Moeve.

Me-ward, to, towards me, B 1. m 1. 20; T. iv. 1666.

Mewe, s. mew, i.e. coop wherein fowls were fattened, A 349; properly, a coop for hawks when moulting, F 643; hiding-place, T. iii. 602. See Muwe.

Mewet, adj. mute, T. v. 194. See note.

Mexcuse, for Me excuse, excuse myself, 16. 36.

Meynee, s. household, T. ii. 614; v. 526; B 1238, 1510, D 2045, I 894; company, R. 1305; L. 1222, 1498; E 2436; followers, suite, retinue, retainers, household-servants, R. 615, 634; L. 1059; B 2. p 5. 64; HF. 194; D 2156; F 391; household, menials, A 1258; army, troop, B 3532, 4584; assembly, HF. 933; Meinee, retinue, I 437, 438; troop, A 4381; Meiny, crew, L. 2201; Meignee, household, I 894 n. O. F. meisnee, maisnee, household (Lat. mansionata); cf. E. menials.

Meyntenaunce, s. demeanour, 3. 834.

Michel, adj. much, A. ii. 23. 18. See Muchel.

Mid, adj. middle, 3. 660.

Midday, s. A ii. i. 5.

Middel, s. middle, waist, R. 1032.

Midel, adj. middle, neither tall nor short, 7. 79.

Midnight, s. T. iii. 602.

Might, s. power, 5. 149; 10. 62; B 2. p 5. 8; B 5. p 2. 18; A 538, F 467; magic power, F 133; strength, R. 831.

Mighte, -n; see Mowen.

Mightily, adv. mightily, B 3517; strongly, B 921.

Mighty, adj. mighty, 1. 6; A 108.

Mikel, adj. great, 7. 99; much, L. 1175, 1677.

Milde, adj. fem. mild, T. v. 194.

Mile-wey, s. a space of 5°, which answers to twenty minutes of time, the average time for walking a mile; hence the term, A. i. 7. 7; pl. Milewey, A. i. 16. 11.

Milk, s. R. 1196; A 147, 358, 2908, B 4034, F 614, H 175.

Milksop, s. a milk-sop, lit. a piece of bread sopped in milk; hence, anything soft, esp. a weak, effeminate man, B 3100.

Milky Wey, the milky way, HF. 937.

Mille, s. mill, E 1200, I 406. See Melle.

Millère, s. miller, A 542; Miller, 545, 3925.

Millioun, s. million, D 1685.

Milne-stones, pl. mill-stones, T. ii. 1384. A.S. myln.

Minde, s. remembrance, 3. 55; T. ii. 602; B 2. p 2. 46; L. 18, 557, 1366; A 1402, 1906, B 908, 1127, F 878; memory, HF. 564, 823; B 527; right mind, sane mind, B 3. p 12. 108; recollection, B 1. p 3. 2; in m., in remembrance, T. iv. 18; B 1843, F 109, 607.

Ministre, s. minister, B 168; Ministres, pl. officers, B 4233.

Ministre, v.; Ministreth, pr. s. administers, governs, B 3. m 6. 2.

Minne, imp. s. remember, mention, 16. 48. A.S. gemynnan.

Minstralcye, s. minstrelsy, L. 2615; A 2197, 2524, 4394, E 1718; musical instrument, H 113; sound of music, F 268; musical instruments, H 267.

Minstráles, pl. minstrels, R. 764; B 2035; Minstrallès, F 78; Minstrals, I 814.

Mintinge, pres. pt. intending, B 1. m 2. 2. A.S. myntan.

Minutes, s. pl. (1) minutes of time, A. i. 7. 8; (2) Minute, i.e. a sixtieth part of a degree, A. i. 8. 8; see A. i. 8. 10.

Mirácle, s. wonder, A 2675; Miràcle, legend, B 1881; Mirácles, pl. wonderful acts, 5. 11; A 1788; pleyes of m., miracle-plays, D 558.

Mire, s. H 290; see Myre.

Mirour, s. mirror, R. 567, 1585; B 5. m 4. 8; 3. 974; 10. 10; 21. 8; T. i. 365; A 1399, B 166, E 1582, 1585, F 82, 132, 143, 175, 1454, G 668; Mirror (Lat. Speculum), L. 307 a; see note.

Mirre, s. myrrh, A 2938.

Mirthe, s. pleasure, amusement, R. 601; 3. 612; A 759, 766, 767; Mirthe, Sir, Mirth (personified), R. 733; Murthe, joy, E 1123. A.S. myrhð.

Mirtheles, adj. without mirth, sad, 5. 592.

Mis, adj. wrong, amiss, 7. 279; T. iv. 1348; bad, HF. 1975; blameworthy, G 999.

Mis, s. wrong, evil, L. 266 a.

Mis, adv. amiss, wrongly, B 4. p 5. 14; T. i. 934.

Mis, 1 pr. s. lack, have not, 6. 47. See Misse.

Misacounted, pp. miscounted, T. v. 1185.

Misaunter, s. misadventure, misfortune, T 766. (Aunter = aventure; see below.)

Misaventure, s. misadventure, misfortune, mishap, R. 253; 4. 140, 229; B 616, 3540, D 1334; mischief, R. 422.

Misavyse, pr. pl. refl. advise themselves amiss, act unadvisedly, D 230.

Misbileve, s. belief of trickery, suspicion, G 1213.

Misbileved, pp. misbelieving ones, infidels, 1. 146.

Misboden, pp. offered (to do you) evil, insulted, A 909. Pp. of misbēden.

Misborn, pp. misbehaved, B 3067 (lit. 'borne amiss').

Miscarie, v. go amiss, A 513.

Mischaunce, s. ill luck, R. 1548; 1. 85; T. i. 118; mischance, R. 251; misfortune, L. 1826; Mischance, ill luck, D 1334; to mischaunce, i.e. to the devil, T. ii. 222, v. 359; how m., how the mischief, T. iv. 1362.

Mischeef, s. misfortune, L. 1278; Mischef, misfortune, danger, 4. 58; harm, R. 253. See Meschief.

Misconceyve, v.; Misconceyveth, pr. s. misunderstands, E 2410.

Misconstrue, v. misconstrue, T. i. 346.

Miscounting, s. fraudulent reckoning, R. 196. See note.

Misdedes, pl. misdeeds, D 1664.

Misdeme, v.; Misdemeth, pr. s. misjudges, E 2410; Misdemen, pr. pl. HF. 92; Misdeme, pr. s. subj. HF. 97.

Misdeparteth, pr. s. parts or divides amiss, B 107.

Misdoeres, pl. misdoers, B 2631.

Misdooth, pr. s. doeth amiss to, illtreats, B 3112; Misdoon, pp. done amiss, I 85.

Misdrawinges, s. pl. way of drawing aside, B 3. p 12. 74.

Misericorde, s. (there is) mercy, pity, T. iii. 1177; mercy, pity, 1. 25, 35; B 2608, D 1910, I 804, 805; Misericordes, pl. mercy, pity, B 3. m 12. 31.

Misérie, s. misery, T. iv. 272; B 3167.

Misese, s. trouble, I 806; discomfort, I 177; Miseise, discomfort, I 194; Miseyses, pl. injuries, B 1. p 4. 48.

Misesed, pp. troubled, vexed, I 806.

Misfille, pt. s. subj. it went amiss (with), A 2388. From infin. misfalle.

Misforyaf, pt. s. misgave, T. iv. 1426. From infin. misforyive.

Misgoon, pp. gone astray, I 80; gone to the wrong place, A 4218; Misgon, gone amiss, A 4252; Misgo, A 4255.

Misgovernaunce, s. misconduct, B 3202.

Misgyed, pp. misguided, misconducted, B 3723. See Gye.

Mishap, s. ill luck, B. 3435.

Mishappe, v. meet with misfortune, B 2886; pr. s. subj. (it) may happen ill for, A 1646.

Mishappy, adj. unhappy, B 2758.

Misknowinge, adj. ignorant, B 2. p 8. 17.

Misknowinge, s. ignorance, B 3. m 11. 18.

Mislay, pt. s. lay in an uncomfortable position, A 3647. From infin. mislye.

Misledden, pt. pl. misconducted, T. iv. 48. From infin. mislede.

Misledinges, pl. misdirections, misguiding ways, B 3. p 8. 2.

Mislyke, v.; Mislyketh, pr. s. displeases, L. 1293.

Mislyved, pp. of ill life, treacherous, T. iv. 330.

Mismetre, pr. s. subj. scan amiss, T. v. 1796.

Mis-sat, pt. s. was not where it should be, 3. 941; misbecame, R. 1194.

Misse, v. fail, 5. 75; B 1542, D 1416; draw to an end, 5. 40; ger. T. iii. 1624; Mis, 1 pr. s. lack, have not, 6. 47; Missed, pt. s. was wanting (to), T. iii. 445; pp. missed, missing, T. iii. 537. A.S. missan.

Mis-set, pp. ill-timed, misplaced, 3. 1210.

Misseye, 1 pr. s. speak amiss, 7. 317; Misseyest, 2 pr. s. speakest ill of, L. 323; Misseyeth, pr. s. slanders, I 379; Misseyde, pt. s. said amiss, L. 440; Misseyd, pp. said amiss, H 353; Misseid, pp. spoken evil of, R. 1260; missayd or do, said or done wrong, 3. 528.

Misspeke, 1 pr. s. subj. speak wrongly, A 3139.

Mist, s. mist, HF. 352; F 259; Mistes, pl. HF. 966.

Mistake, v.; Mistaketh, 2 pr. pl. transgress, trespass, R. 1540; Mistake, pp. committed an error, 3. 525.

Mister, s. trade, handicraft, occupation, A 613; need, R. 1426; Mester, occupation, A 1340; what m. men, men of what occupation, what sort of men, A 1710. See Mester.

Misterye, s. ministry, profession, I 895; Misterie, ministry, I 900. From Lat. ministerium.

Mistihede, s. mystery, 4. 224. M.E. misty, mystical, from F. mystique, 'mysticall': Cotgrave.

Mis-torneth, pr. pl. turn aside, B 3. p 3. 6; Mistorned, pp. misled, B 4. p 2. 130.

Mistrust, s. T. ii. 780.

Mistrusten, v. (to) mistrust, T. i. 688; Mistriste, v. C 369; Mistrusten, 2 pr. pl. mistrust, T. iv. 1606; Mistruste, 2 pr. pl. E 2343; Mistrusted, pp. distrusted, T. ii. 431.

Misty, adj. misty, T. iii. 1060.

Mistyde, v. be unlucky, B 2886.

Miswanderinge, adj. erring, B 2. p 8. 20; straying (Lat. deuius), B 3. p 2. 16.

Miswent, pp. gone amiss, T. i. 633.

Mis-weyes, s. pl. by-paths, B 3. m 11. 2; B 5. p 1. 14.

Miswryte, pr. s. subj. miswrite, T. v. 1795.

Miteyn, s. mitten, glove, C 372, 373. F. mitaine.

Mixen, s. dunghill, I 911. A.S. mixen, meoxen.

Mo (mòò), adj. more, A. pr. 27; more (in number), 3. 266, 408; 5. 595; HF. 124, 125; A 576, 849, B 54, 419, 2358, 3742, 3838, C 6, 891, D 179, E 318, 1412, F 301, 702, G 207, 675, 693, 723, 818; more (in number), besides, L. 917, 1227; others, T. i. 613; E 2113; others, another, T. iii. 1514; E 1039; (others) besides, E 2263; many others besides, D 663; others besides, T. iv. 1125; more besides, D 992; besides, T. ii. 1481, v. 229; A 3183, D 894; tymes mo, at other times, E 449; othere mo, others besides, G 1001; na mo, no more, none else, B 695. A.S. .

Mo, adv. more, any longer, D 864; never the mo, never mo, never, D 691, 1099.

Mochel (muchel), adj. great, B 4. p 1. 30; L. 1966; much, 20. 7; G 611; Moche, great, 3. 904; HF. 971; A. ii. 7. 14; much, B 1169, 2152. See Muchel.

Mochel, adv. much, 3. 1102; B 3959.

Mochel, s. size, 3. 454, 861. Cf. A.S. mycelu, magnitude.

Mocioun, s. motion, B 2429; proposal, T. iv. 1291.

Moder, s. mother, 1. 49, 99; 5. 292; L. 338, 1828; B 276, 696, 1657, 1696, I 117; the thickest plate forming the principal part of the astrolabe (Lat. mater or rotula), A. i. 3. 1; Modres, gen. mother's, B 1783; C 729, G 1243; Modres, pl. Mothers, C 93. A.S. mōdor.

Moeble, adj. moveable, A. i. 21. 49.

Moeble, s. moveable goods, property, personal property, T. iv. 1380, 1460; v. 300; Moebles, pl. G 540.

Moedes, s. pl. moods, strains (of music), B 2. p 1. 32.

Moevable, adj. impressionable, fickle, B 4. m 5. 23; as s. The firste m., the 'primum mobile,' A. i. 17. 29.

Moevabletee, s. mobility, B 4. p 6. 80.

Moeve, ger. to stir up, B 2218; v. move, I 133; stir up, begin, B 2839; Moeved, pt. s. disturbed, B 1136; Moeved, pp. troubled, B 4. p 6. 175; Moeving, pres. pt. B 295. See Meve.

Moevere, s. mover, A 2987.

Moeving, s. moving, motion, B 2. p 5. 32; A. pr. 66; Firste moeving, the 'primum mobile,' A. i. 17. 27; Moevyng, B 2429; Moevynges, pl. motions, I 655.

Moiste, adj. moist, A 420; Moist (for Moiste, before a vowel), 5. 380; Moiste, pl. supple, A 457. See Moyste. O. F. moiste.

Moiste, adj. as s. moisture, R. 1564.

Moisture, s. R. 1424; I 220.

Mokereres, s. pl. misers, B 2. p 5. 11. See above.

Mokre (mukrə), v. hoard up, T. iii. 1375; Mokeren, pr. pl. B 2. p 5. 11. See muckren in Stratmann.

Moleste, v. molest, vex, T. iv. 880.

Molestie, s. trouble, B 3. p 9. 77.

Mollificacioun, s. mollifying, softening, G 854.

Molte, pp.; see Melte.

Moment, s. A 2584.

Monche (munchə), v. munch, T. i. 914.

Mone (móónə), s. moon, 3. 824; 4. 235; HF. 2116; T. i. 1024; A. pr. 66; L. 1972, 2503; A 2077, 3352, C 23, F 1287; moon, i.e. position or 'quarter' of the moon, A 403; Mone, gen. B 2070; Mones, gen. F 1154; I 10. A.S. mōna.

Mone (mòònə), s. moan, complaint, 4. 143; T. i. 696, iv. 950; A 1366, F 920. See Moon.

Mone (mòònə), v. refl. to lament, T. i. 98.

Mone-light, s. moon-light, R. 1010.

Moneth, s. month, A. i. 10. 13, ii. 44. 37; pl. Monethis, ii. 44. 35. A.S. mōnað. See Month.

Monéye, s. money, A 703, B 1528, G 1033; B 3. p 3. 9.

Monk (munk), s. monk, A 165, B 3114; Monkes, pl. B 1632.

Monstre, s. monster, B 2. p 1. 11; L. 1928, 1991; E 2062; prodigy, F 1344; horrible thing, B 1. p 4. 140; Monstres, gen. of a monster, 3. 628; pl. B 3302.

Monstrous, adj. monstrous, B 4. m 3. 22.

Montaigne, s. mountain, B 24; Montayne, B 3776; Monteyne, B 3817; Mountain, D 1887; Montaignes, pl. B 3454.

Month, s. month, A 92; Monthes, pl. A 704; T. ii. 50; Monthes, gen. pl. (after twelf), B 1674. See Moneth.

Mood (móód), s. anger, A 1760; thought, C 126. A.S. mōd.

Moon (mòòn), s. moan, lamentation, complaint, L. 1169, 1799, 2379. See Mone.

Moorne, v.; Morne, ger. D 848; Moorne, 1 pr. s. mourn, A 3704; Moorneth, pr. s. F 819; Moorne, pr. pl. B 1933.

Moorninge, s. mourning, plaint, A 3706; Moorning, A 2968, B 621.

Moot (mòòt), s. pl. notes on a horn, 3. 376. See note.

Moot (móót), 1 pr. s. must, shall, 5. 642; 6. 85; T. iii. 1195, B 1853, 3104, E 872, F 41; Moot, pr. s. must, ought to, A 232, 732, 735, 1169, B 3697, D 980; is to (go), B 294; Mot, 1 pr. s. may, 4. 267; must, have to, 5. 469; T. iii. 47; B 227, 737, C 327; Most, 2 pr. s. B 104; Mot, pr. s. must, has to, L. 388, 1945; Mote, 2 pr. pl. may, T. ii. 402; Moten, must, 5. 546; L. 343; Mote, pr. pl. must, 4. 198; L. 1925; Mote, pr. pl. must, A 742; Moten, B 2560; ought, D 589; Mote (or Moot), pr. s. subj. may, HF. 102; L. 843; G 634, H 80; is sure to, L. 1632; Moot (or Mote) I goon, may I still go, may I still retain the power to walk, F 777; So moot (or mote) I thee, as I may thrive, as I hope to thrive, C 309, D 361; As ever mote I, A 832, D 194; Foule moot thee falle, ill may it befall thee, H 40; Moot (or Mote) thou, mayst thou, B 1626, E 557; Moste, 1 pt. s. must (go), B 282; Moste, pt. s. must, 4. 250; must (go), HF. 187; must, ought to, B 2031, 3232, F 442; had to, B 886, G 523; ought to (be), F 38; was made to, B 3700; Mosten, pt. pl. must, should, L. 99; Moste, pt. s. subj. might, L. 1573, 1574, 2264; B 380, E 550; us moste, it must be for us, we must resolve to, G 946. A.S. mōt; pt. t. mōste. See further under Most.

Moral, adj. excellent in character, T. iv. 1672; moral, T. ii. 167, v. 1836; A 307, C 325, 460.

Moralitee, s. morality, A 3180, B 3687; moral tale, I 38; moral writing, I 1088; moral of a tale, B 4630.

Mordre, s. murder, R. 1136; 9. 64; A 1256, B 1820; m. wol out, B 4242.

Mordre, ger. to murder, kill, L. 1536; 1 pr. s. 7. 291; Mordred, 2 pt. pl. subj. were to murder, 3. 724; Mordred, pp. B 4195, D 801, E 725, 728.

Mordrer, s. murderer, 5. 353, 612; E 732; Mordrour, L. 2390.

Mordring, s. murdering, A 2001.

More (móórə), adj. greater, 7. 240; B 4. p 2. 139; T. i. 643, v. 819; HF. 1495, 2067; B 2396, E 1231; larger, HF. 500; A. i. 13. 2; More and lesse, all alike, every one, B 959, C 275, D 934, F 1054; More or lesse, 10. 61; More and more, HF. 532; withouten more, without further trouble, T. iv. 133. A.S. māra.

More (mòòre), adv. more, A 219; further, in a greater degree, B 3745, 3842.

More (mòrə), s. root, T. v. 25. A.S. moru. (The o is open and not fully long.)

Mormal, s. sore, gangrene, A 386. See note.

Morne, s. morning; morne milk = morne-milk (compound sb.), morning-milk, A 358, 3236.

Morne, ger. to mourn, D 848. See Moorne.

Morow; see Morwen.

Morsel, s. morsel, bit, A 128, 130, I 633; m. breed, morsel of bread, B 3624; Morsels, pl. portions to eat, I 195.

Mortal, adj. mortal, deadly, 2. 61; 5. 135; A 61; T. iii. 376; Mortel, fatal, L. 2252.

Mortally, adv. H 313.

Morter, s. mortar, 9. 15; T. iv. 1245 (see the note).

Mortificacion, s. mortification, I 1080.

Mortifye, v. mortify; lit. kill; used of producing change by chemical action, G 1431 (see note to the line); G 1126; Mortified, pp. deadened, I 233.

Mortreux, pl. thickened soups or pottages, A 384. (Also spelt mortrewes; thus x is for s.) See the note.

Morwen, s. morning, morrow, T. ii. 1555, iii. 389; Morwe, L. 49, 108; A. ii. 12. 26; A 1034, D 1080, F 906, I 471; 3. 22, 595; fore part of a day, T. iv. 1308; Morow, 4. 1; Morowe, dat. R. 94; by the morwe, early in the morning, A 334, B 3586, H 16; Morwes, pl. 3. 411; HF. 4. A.S. morgen.

Morweninge, s. morning, 4. 151; A 1062, B 4492, F 397; dawning, 4. 26; Morwening, L. 1483; Morweninges, pl. mornings, D 875.

Morwe-song, s. morning-song, A 830.

Morwe-tyde, s. morning-hour, E 2225; in the m., in the morning, B 4206, F 901, G 588; the morning-time, I 708; Morow-tyde, morning, R. 130.

Mosel (muzel), s. muzzle, A 2151. O. F. musel.

Most, 2 pt. s. oughtest (to), 8. 3; Moste, pt. s. must, ought (to), A 3088; must (go), HF. 187; had to go, T. v. 5; was obliged to, T. iii. 540; must, might, E 2102; pt. j. subj. might, L. 1594; Mosten, pt. pl. must, might, T. ii. 1507; could, HF. 2094. See further under Moot.

Most, adv. most, chiefly, A 561; most of all, F 1312.

Moste, adj. sup. greatest, 3. 1006; 5. 550; 10. 22; L. 482; A 895, F 199; chief, 3. 630; D 1041; chiefest, F 361; Most, chiefest, B 1. p 3. 47; Moste and leeste, greatest and least (see More), F 300.

Mot, -e, -en; see Moot.

Mote (1) s. mote, atom, T. iii. 1603; Motes, pl. small particles, specks of dust, D 868.

Mote (2), s. motion (Lat. motus), A. ii. 44. 14. The 'mene mote' or mean motion is the average motion of a planet during a given period, as ascertained by tables.

Motre (mutrə), ger. to mutter, T. ii. 541.

Mottelee, s. motley, motley array, A 271.

Motthes, s. pl. moths, B 2187, D 560; Moughtes, B 2187 n.

Motýf, s. motive; hence idea, notion, B 628, E 1491.

Moulen, v. grow mouldy, B 32; Mowled, pp. decayed, A 3870. See muwlen in Stratmann.

Mount, s. mountain, A 1936, D 1140, F 721.

Mountain, s. D 1887. See Montaigne.

Mountance, s. amount, value, quantity, R. 1562; T. iii. 1732; A 1570, C 863; amount (of time), L. 307; length, T. ii. 1707; amount, value, H 255. O. F. montance.

Mourdaunt, s. chape, or metal tag, at the end of a girdle, R. 1094. (Not 'the tongue of a buckle,' as has been said.) See mordant in Godefroy.

Mous, s. mouse, A 144, 1261, 3346, D 246, H 177; Mouses, gen. T. iii. 736; D 572; Mys, pl. mice, B 2. p 6. 22.

Moustre, s. pattern, 3. 912. O. F. moustre, mod. E. muster.

Mouth, s. mouth, A 153; Mouthes, pl. R. 787.

Moveresse, s. a fomentress of quarrels, R. 149. See the French text, l. 141; and the note.

Mowe, s. grimace (see note), T. iv. 7; Mowes, pl. HF. 1806; I 258. O. F. moe.

Mowen, v. be able; mowen shewen, be able to appear, become evident, B 5. p 4. 100; Mowen, ger. to be able, to have power, T. ii. 1594; May, 1 pr. s. may, B 89, 2014, E 304; can, B 231, D 1591; May, pr. s. may, A 737; has power, F 112; can do, B 4. p 2. 31; may (there be), T. i. 412; Mayst, 2 pr. s. mayest, 4. 106; canst, L. 327; Maystow, mayest thou, 10. 50; A. i. 21. 48; L. 1952; A 1918, B 3267, E 265, 1070, G 336; Maistow, HF. 699; A 1236; Mowen, 1 pr. pl. can, B 5. p 5. 66; Mowe, 1 pr. pl. can, B 2939, 3151; may, HF. 1735; Mowen, 2 pr. pl. can, 19. 25; T. iv. 1330; Mowe, 2 pr. pl. may, L. 92; B 2575; can, 3. 552; Mowen, pr. pl. may do, B 4. p 11. 159; have power, B 4. p 2. 151; are able to, D 1722; Mowe, pr. pl. may, can, A 2999, 3066, E 530; Mowe, 1 pr. s. subj. may, 3. 94; Mowe, 2 pr. s. subj. mayest, G 460; Mighte, pt. s. might, A 169, &c.; 1 pt. s. subj. could, E 638; Mighten, pt. pl. might, 5. 318. A.S. mugan.

Mowinge, s. ability, B 4. p 4. 19; p 11. 184. See above.

Mowled, pp. decayed, A 3870. See Moulen.

Moysoun, s. crop, growth, R. 1677. O. F. moison; from Lat. acc. mensionem.

Moyste, adj.. moist, B 2182; fresh, new, B 1954, C 315. See Moiste.

Moysty, adj. new (applied to ale), H 60.

Muable, adj. mutable, B 4. p 6. 30; changeable, T. iii. 822.

Muchel, adj. much, great, A 2352, B 2582, 2601, D 1273, H 335; a great deal of, F 349; in so m., in so much, B 2644; many, G 673; Muche, great, A 494; much, A 211; Mochel, great, B 4. p 1. 30; L. 1966; much, 20. 7; G 611; Moche, great, 3. 904; HF. 971; A. ii. 7. 14; Michel, much, A. ii. 23. 18; for as mechel, for as much, A. pr. 4. A.S. micel; later, mycel.

Muchel, adv. greatly, A 258; much, T. i. 386; D 809, F 1129; Muche, greatly, A 132.

Mulier est hominis confusio, woman is man's confusion, B 4354.

Mullok, s. a heap of refuse, A 3873; confused heap of materials, G 938, 940. Cf. Gower, ii. 204.

Multiplicacioun, s. multiplication, HF. 784, 820; multiplying, i.e. the art of alchemy, G 849.

Multiplye, v. to make gold and silver by the arts of alchemy, G 669; ger. G 731; imp, s.. multiply, A. ii. 41 a. 3 (p. 230).

Multiplying, s. increase, C 374.

Murmuracion, s. murmuring, I 499.

Murmure, s. murmuring, A 2459; murmur, I 503; Murmur, E 628, 726; Murmour, 5. 520; Murmurs, pl. HF. 686.

Murmuren, v.; Murmureden, pt. pl. murmured, talked continually in a low voice, buzzed, F 204.

Murmuringe, s. murmur, A 2432.

Murthe, s. mirth, joy, E 1123. A.S. myrhð. See Mirthe.

Murye, adj. merry, A 1386. See Mery.

Muscle, s. mussel, D 2100; Muscules, pl. mussels, B 5. p 5. 21.

Muse, s. muse, poetic faculty, 16. 38; (Muse), HF. 1399.

Muse, ger. to consider, T. iii. 563; Museth, pr. s. gazes into, R. 1592; Mused, pt. s. considered, B 1033; Musede, pt. s. gazed intently, R. 1527; Mused, pp. gazed, R. 1645. O. F. muser.

Musice, music, B 2. p 1. 31.

Musiciens, pl. musicians, B 2. p 6. 68.

Musýke, music, 5. 62; Musik, B 4483.

Mutabilitee, s. changefulness, 10. 57; T. i. 851.

Mutable, adj. B 4. p 6. 110.

Mutacioun, s. transformation, B 4. m 3. 25; Mutaciouns, pl. changes, B 5. p 6. 196.

Muwe, s. mew, pen (for hawks), cage, T. i. 381; iii. 1784; iv. 1310; in muwe, cooped up, T. iv. 496. See Mewe.

Muwe, v. change, T. ii. 1258. O. F. muer.

Muwet, the same as Mewet, T. v. 194 n.

My, my, A 763, &c.

Myle, s. mile, HF. 1038; fyve m., five miles, G 555; Myles, pl. HF. 1979; G 561.

Myn, poss. mine, 5. 437; B 40; E 365; &c.

Mynde, s. dat. mind, recollection, 3. 15; 5. 69; acc. reason, 2. 34; 3. 511; have minde upon, remember, 19. 26. See Minde.

Myne, v. undermine, T. iii. 767; ger. to mine, T. ii. 677.

Mynoresse, error for Moveresse, R. 149 n.

Mynour, s. miner, one who mines, A 2465.

Myre, s. mire, A 508; D 972; Mire, H 290.

Myrie, adj. merry, A 1499. See Mery.

Myrie, adv. merrily, A 3575.

Myrier, adv. comp. merrier, R. 876. See Merier.

Mys, pl. mice, B 2. p 6. 22. See Mous.

Myscoueiting, error for Miscounting, R. 196 n.

My-selven, myself, A 803, F 1362; 3. 34; Myself, A 544.

Myte (1), s. mite, thing of no value, 4. 126; 7. 269; T. iii. 832; iv. 684; L. 741; A 1558; G 511, 633, 698, 1421. O. F. mite, a copper coin of Flanders.

Myte (2), mite, insect; Mytes, pl. D 560. A.S. mīte.

Mytre, s. mitre, 14. 7.

 

N', for ne, not; as in nacheveth for ne acheveth, and the like.

Na, no (Northern), A 4175.

Na mo, i.e. no more, none else, B 695; Na-mo, G 543. See Mo.

Nacheveth, for ne acheveth, achieves not, T. v. 784.

Naciouns, pl. nations, A 53.

Nadde, pt. s. (for ne hadde), had not, R. 457; L. 278; H 51; pt. pl. G 879; Nad, 3. 224.

Naddre, s. adder, E 1786, I 331; Nadres, pl. adders, B 5. m 5. 4. A.S. nædre, næddre. See Neddre.

Nadir, s. the point of the ecliptic exactly opposite to that in which the sun is situate, A. ii. 6. 1; see l. 8. Arabic nadhír es-semt, i.e. opposite to the zenith, for which the term nadhír simply, signifying 'opposite,' was commonly used.

Nadstow, 2 pt. s. haddest thou not, didst thou not, A 4088.

Naieth, pr. s. refuses, B 1. m 1. 16 n. (Incorrect; for Naiteth.)

Naille, imp. s. 3 p. let it nail, let it fasten, E 1184; Nailinge, pres. pt. pl. nailing, A 2503; Nayled, pp. fastened, E 29.

Naite, v.; Naiteth, pr. s. refuses, B 1. m 1. 16. See Nayte.

Nake, 2 pr. pl. make naked, B 4. m 7. 45; Naked, pp. as adj. naked, 3. 125; L. 126; A 1956, I 105; bare, 3. 978; HF. 133; destitute, void, weak, G 486; simple, plain, A. pr. 19. A.S. nacod, a pp. form.

Nakednesse, s. nakedness, E 866.

Nakers, pl. kettle-drums, A 2511. From the Arabic; see note.

Nale; atte nale, at the ale, at the ale-house, D 1349.

Nam (for ne am), 1 pr. s. am not, L. 47, 192; A. pr. 43; A 1122, B 2710; nam but deed, am only a dead man, 3. 204.

Nam, pt. s. took, G 1297. A.S. niman, to take; pt. t. ic nam; cf. G. nehmen, to take.

Name, s. name, 1. 74; A 854; good name, reputation, L. 1812, 1845; F 1362; title, B 3. p 6. 24. A.S. nama.

Nameles, adj. without renown, B 4. p 5. 5.

Namely, adv. especially, R. 596, 1357; 7. 260; A 1268, 2709, C 402, D 407, 2050, E 484, 626, F 739, I 296; L. 595, 931, 1519, 2133.

Namo (for na mo), no more in number, A 101, 544; none other, no one else, D 957, 975, F 573. See Na and Mo.

Namore, adv. no more, A 98, B 1112, C 962, D 1296, F 289, 314, G 651, 1266, I 84.

Napoplexye, for Ne apoplexye, nor apoplexy, B 4031.

Nappe, v.; Nappeth, pr. s. naps, slumbers, nods, H 9. A.S. hnappian.

Narcotiks, pl. narcotics, L. 2670; Nercotikes, A 1472.

Narette; see Arette.

Narowe, adv. close, 7. 183.

Nart (for ne art), art not, 1. 26; B 1. p 5. 7; B 3. p 5. 45; G 499.

Narwe, adj. small, B 4012; pl. A 625; close, closely drawn, D 1803.

Narwe, adv. narrowly, closely, T. iii. 1734; A. pr. 51; A 3224; tightly, L. 600; carefully, E 1988.

Narwest, superl. adj. narrowest, smallest, A. i. 18. 4.

Nas (for ne was), was not, 3. 854; 7. 97; A 251, 288, 1216, 1886, B 159, 209, &c.; I nas but, I was simply, 2. 21.

Nassayeth, for ne assayeth, attempts not, T. v. 784.

Nat, adv. not, A 74, 156, 428, B 124, &c.; Nat but, only, merely, L. 1899, 2040; C 403, F 391, 638; quite, L. 2091.

Nat (for ne at), nor at, B 290; see note. Cf. Nin.

Nat forthy, adv. notwithstanding, B 2165.

Natal, adj. who presides over nativities, T. iii. 150. Compare the expression Iouem Genethlium in Jerome, as quoted in the note to Cant. Tales, D 677.

Nath (for ne hath), pr. s. hath not, T. v. 1199; A 923.

Nathelees, nevertheless, A 35, 1832, 2473, B 621, C 813, G 717, I 91; Natheles, R. 1481; L. 4, 188; A. pr. 21; 2. 111; 5. 390.

Nativitee, s. nativity, birth, T. ii. 685; L. 2576; B 3206, F 45; Nativite, A. ii. 4. 44; Nativìtez, pl. A. ii. 4. 1.

Nature, s. nature, A 11; kind, race, 5. 615; seed, I 577; Nature of resoun, rational being, B 5. p 2. 7.

Naturel, adj. natural, A 416, F 116; 4. 122; L. 376. A 'day natural' is a period of 24 hours, as distinct from the 'day artificial.'

Naturelly, adv. by nature, F 1052; by natural causes, F 229.

Natyf, adj. native, T. i. 102.

Naught, s. nothing, A 756.

Naught, adv. not, A. pr. 37; B 1701; not so, G 269. See Nat, Nought.

Nave, s. nave (of a wheel), D 2266, 2270.

Navele, s. navel, A 1957.

Navye, s. navy, fleet, B 4. m 7. 7; HF. 216; L. 960, 1335.

Naxe (for ne axe), ask not, T. v. 594.

Nay, adv. nay, no, 3. 1243; 18. 63; D 1098, E 177, G 1339; (opposed to yea), E 355; (answers a direct question), B 740, B 1793; surely not! 3. 1309; as s. nay, untruth, 3. 147; It is no nay, there is no denying it, B 1956, E 817, 1139. Icel. nei.

Nayl, s. nail, A 2007; nail, i.e. hindrance, A 3877 (see note); Nayles, pl. D 769; finger-nails, 3. 955; T. ii. 1034; B 3366, C 288; nails, claws, A 2141; and see note to C 651.

Nayte, v. withhold, deny, I 1013; Naiteth, pr. s. B 1. m 1. 16. Icel. neita, to deny.

Ne, adv. and conj. not, 1. 53; 5. 91; L. 1881, A 70; nor, 3. 2, 74; A 179, 526, B 2710, C 619; ne ... ne, neither ... nor, A 603; (when used with a verb, a second negative is often added), as in no—ne, B 77; ne—noon, B 89; ne ... never, never, 3. 1196; ne ... thing, nothing, 3. 1262; ne doth, do ye not, C 745.

Nece, s. niece, T. i. 975; B 1290; Neces, gen. niece's, T. ii. 76, 78; Neces, pl. nieces (or relatives), T. ii. 814.

Necessárie, adj. necessary, H 95; Necessaries, pl. necessary, B 5. p 4. 84; Necessaire, necessary, T. iv. 1021; Necessaries, pl. necessities, B 711.

Necessen, v.; Necesseden, pt. pl. compelled, B 3. m 9. 5.

Necessitee, s. necessity, T. iv. 1012, 1014; A 3042, F 593.

Necligence, s. negligence, A 1881, B 22, C 98, E 661; Negligence, 8. 7; L. 537.

Necligent, adj. negligent, careless, B 2512, C 101, D 1816, I 362; Negligent, 5. 429.

Neddre, s. adder, E 1786 n; Neddres, pt. L. 699. See Naddre.

Nede (néédə, sometimes as nèèdə), s. need, extremity, 1. 44; T. i. 772, iii. 49; B 102, 658, 2360; extremity, difficult matter, B 2917; peril, B 3576 (see note); at nede, at need, 1. 112; for nede, if needful, R. 1123; s. as adj. needful, A 304, B 2358; Nedes, pl. matters of business, B 174, 1266; necessities, T. ii. 954; needs, G 178; for nedes, for very need, 3. 1201. A.S. nýd, nēd, nēad.

Nede, adv. necessarily, of necessity, R. 1441, 1473; HF. 724; T. ii. 671; 3. 1074; needs, B 3697, E 531, G 1280. Pronounced as néde, or rimes with drede, dede.

Nede, v. be necessary, B 871; Nedeth, pr. s. (it) is necessary, (it) needs, 1. 118; A 462, 3028, D 2097, F 65, 298; what n., what is the need of, A 849, 1029; Nededè, pt. s. impers. (there) needed, A 4020, 4161; it was needful, T. v. 726; Neded, pt. s. E 457; Neded, pt. s. subj.; us neded, it would be necessary for us, we should need, T. iv. 1344.

Nedeful, adj. needy, I 805; as s. I 1032.

Nedelees, adv. needlessly, I 600; Needles, E 621; Needless, E 455.

Nedely, adv. of necessity, necessarily, T. iv. 970; B 4435, D 968; Needly, B 3. p 9. 65.

Nedes, adv. needs, necessarily, of necessity, R. 1479; L. 1298, 2697 (see Cost); A 1290, D 1071, E 11, F 1163, 1563; HF. 1635.

Nedes-cost, adv. of necessity, A 1477, L. 2697. See Cost.

Nedle, s. needle, R. 97; Nedles, gen. G 440.

Nedy, adj. needy, B 2607.

Need (nèèd), s. need, 3. 1253. See Nede.

Needles, adv. needlessly, E 621; Needless, without a cause, E 455. See Nedeles.

Needly, adv. necessarily, B 3. p 9. 65. See Nedely.

Neen, no (Northern), A 4185, 4187.

Neer, adv. comp. nearer, T. ii. 562, v. 80; L. 314, 318, 832; A. ii. 42. 3; A 839, 968, B 4000; G 721; neer and neer, A 4304; as pos. adv. near, A 1439; fer or neer, far or near, T. i. 451. See Ner.

Neet, pl. neat, cattle, A 597. A.S. nēat.

Negardye, s. niggardliness, 10. 53. See Nigardye.

Negh, adv. nearly, almost, 3. 907. A.S. nēah.

Neghen, v. draw nigh, L. 318.

Negligence, s. 8. 7; L. 537. See Necligence.

Negligent, 5. 429. See Necligent.

Neigh, adj. near, nigh, B 2558, F 49; Ney, A. ii. 3. 47. See Ny.

Neigh, adv. nearly, T. i. 60; Negh, 3. 907. See Ny.

Neighebour, s. neighbour, A 535, B 108, 115, 3108; F 961. Neigheboures, gen. D 239; Neighebores, pl. neighbours, dwellers near, L. 720; Neyghebores, HF. 649.

Neighen, v. draw near, T. ii. 1555.

Neither nother, (in) neither the one nor the other (see note), B 5. m 3. 34.

Nekke, s. neck, R. 551, 555; 3. 939; T. ii. 986; A 238, 393, 1218; B 3300, E 113; Nekkes, pl. necks, 5. 671. A.S. hnecca.

Nekke-boon, s. neck-bone, B 1839; neck, D 906; nape of the neck, B 669.

Nel, 1 pr. s. will not, T. ii. 726.

Nempnen, v. name, B 507; Nempne, v. to name, tell, F 318; pt. s. Nempned, named, E 609. A.S. nemnan.

Nenforce, for Ne enforce, T. iv. 1016 n.

Nentendement, for Ne entendement, T. iv. 1696 n.

Nenvye, for ne envye, imp. s. envy not, T. v. 1789.

Ner, adv. comp. nearer, 2. 19; 3. 888; B 1. p 1. 59; T. i. 448; Nere, 3. 38, 134, 450; ner and ner, B 1710; Ner the les, nevertheless, 4. 130. See Neer.

Nercotikes, pl. narcotics, A 1472. See Narcotiks.

Nere (for ne were), 2 pt. s. wast not, 4. 112; pt. pl. were not, 3. 959; L. 348, 686, 792; A 875, D 1944; 1 pt. s. subj. should not (I) be, T. ii. 409; Nere, pt. s. subj. would not be, should not be, 4. 35; T. iv. 987; A 1129; were not, B 3984, G 1362; were it not, B 132; were it not (for), 1. 24, 180; pt. pl. subj. B 547.

Nere, adv. nearer, R. 1454; 3. 38; 5. 619. See Ner, Neer.

Nerf, s. nerve, i.e. sinew, T. ii. 642.

Nescapest (for Ne escapest), escapest not, L. 2643.

Nest, s. D 1691; wikked nest, i.e. mau ni, or Mauny (see note), B 3573; Nestes, pl. HF. 1516.

Net, s. R. 1471, 1624; L. 131; Nettes, pl. nets, L. 1190; T. iii. 1355; B 3665.

Net-herdes, gen. neat-herd's, B 2746.

Nether, adj. lower, A. i. 12. 6; A 3852; Nethere, A. i. 5. 13.

Netherest, adj. superl. lowest, i.e. outermost, A. i. 18. 5; Nethereste, lowest, A. i. 4. 2; nethermost, B 1. p 1. 20, 25.

Netle, s. nettle, T. i. 948; iv. 461.

Nevene, s. name, T. iii. 1723 n.

Nevene, v. name, HF. 562, 1253; G 821; herd hir name n., heard (him) name her name, T. i. 876; ger. HF. 1438; pr. pl. L. 2237; pr. pl. subj. may mention, G 1473. Icel. nefna.

Never, adv. never, A 70, 734, B 87; n. dide but, never did aught that was not, 4. 297; n. the neer, none the nearer, G 721.

Neveradel, adv. not a bit, C 670. See Del.

Never-mo, adv. never oftener, never (with two exceptions), A. ii. 31. 3; never, 3. 1125; never again, A 1346.

Never-the-les, adv. nevertheless, 6. 74; 7. 99, 236; Never-the-lasse, T. iii. 86.

Nevew, s. nephew, L. 1442; B 3594; grandson, L. 2659; HF. 617. Anglo-F. nevu.

Newe, adj. fresh, R. 856; new, 2. 29; A 176, D 1244, E 841, F 1015; as fem. s. a new (love), HF. 302. A.S. nēowe, nīwe.

Newe, adv. newly, freshly, afresh, R. 540, 558, 1214; L. 103; T. i. 222; A 365, 428, E 3, 378, I 767; of newe, new, fresh, T. ii. 20; Newe and newe, again and again, T. iii. 116; afresh, continually, C 929.

Newe, v. renew; Neweth, pr. s. B 4. p 6. 104; Newe, 2 pr. pl. 23. 11; Newed, pt. s. had something fresh in it, 3. 906; Newed, pp. renewed, B 3036.

Newefangel, adj. fond of novelty, F 618, H 193.

New-fangelnesse, s. fondness for novelty, 7. 141; L. 154; F 610; Newe-fangelnesse, 21. 1.

Neweliche, adv. newly, recently, B 4. m 3. 10; Newely, R. 1205.

Newe-thought, s. Inconstancy, R. 982.

Nexte, adj. sup. nearest, 4. 54; HF. 1107; L. 2481; A 1413, B 807, 1814, C 870; last, HF. 1775; next, D 1010; easiest, T. i. 697.

Ney, adj. nigh, A. ii. 3. 47. See Neigh, Ny.

Neyghebores, pl. neighbours, HF. 649. See Neighebour.

Nigard, adj. niggardly, R. 1172.

Nigard, s. miser, niggard, R. 1175; T. iii. 1379; B 4105; Nigardes, pl. D 1263.

Nigardye, s. miserliness, B 1362; Negardye, 10. 53.

Night, s. night, A 23, 268; Nighte, dat. by night, 3. 2; a night, by night, B 3758; Night, as pl. nights, B 4063, D 1885.

Night-cappe, s. nightcap, E 1853.

Nighte, ger. to grow dark, become night, T. v. 515; v. 5. 209.

Nighter-tale, s.; by n., in the night-time, A 97. This expression seems to have resulted from a confusion of Icel. ā nāttar-þeli, in the dead of night, with Icel. nāttar-tal, a tale or number of nights.

Nightingale, s. nightingale, R. 78, 913; 5. 351; T. ii. 918, iii. 1233; A 98, D 458, G 1343, H 136; Nightingales, pl. R. 657, 909.

Night-spel, s. night-spell, night-incantation, A 3480.

Nigromanciens, s. pl. necromancers, I 603.

Nil, 1 pr. s. will not, 3. 92, 1125, 1235; 5. 222, 699; HF. 56; E 363; will (I) not, shall (I) not, T. v. 40, 43, 44; desire not, dislike, E 646; Nille, 1 pr. s. will not, G 1463; Nil, pr. s. will not, B 972, E 119; R. 55; L. 2095, 2653; will not (have), 3. 586; will (she) not, 3. 1140; 1 pr. pl. D 941; Nilt, 2 pr. s. wilt not, T. ii. 1024; L. 758; Niltow, thou wilt not, T. i. 792; wilt thou not, T. iii. 1427. A.S. nyllan, to be unwilling; cf. L. nolle.

Nillinge, s. wishing not to be, B 5. p 2. 14; refusing, B 3. p 11. 60. See above.

Nin, for Ne in, nor in, E 1511, F 35; E 2089 n. Cf. Nat (Ne at).

Ninthe, F 1283; Nynthe, T. v. 681, 1103.

Nis, for ne is, is not, 2. 77; 3. 8; 5. 54; L. 5. 191, 670: A 901, 922, B 319, C 861, &c.; Ther nis no more but, all that remains is that, L. 847.

Niste, 1 pt. s. knew not, 3. 272, 777; 5. 152; HF. 128, 1901; F 502; pt. s. knew not, 3. 1147; T. i. 494; L. 2262; A 3414, 4225, B 384, F 1028, G 216; pt. pl. F 634. A.S. nytan, not to know; pt. t. nyste.

No, adj. no, A. 55, 71, &c. See Noon.

No, adv. no (a strong negative), T. ii. 502; F 1590. Cf. Nay.

Noble, adj. noble, 1. 97; 18. 26; A 60, 214.

Noble, s. a gold coin, A 3256; Nobles, pl. HF. 1315; C 907, G 1365. (Worth 6s. 8d.)

Nobledest, pt. s. 2 p. ennobledest, didst ennoble, G 40. A translation of Dante's nobilitasti. See the note.

Noblesse, s. nobleness, 10. 78; R. 780; B 2. p 3. 28; noble cheer, T. v. 439; nobility, D 1167; (title of respect), B 2956; magnificence, B 3438, E 782; high honour, B 3208; nobility, rank, R. 1034, 1108; worthy behaviour, B 185, 248; T. i. 287.

Nobley, s. nobility, dignity, B 2. p 2. 50; splendour, HF. 1416; noble rank, T. iv. 1670; assembly of nobles, G 449; Nobleye, nobility, E 828; state, F 77. A. F. noblei.

Nodde, v. nod, H. 47.

Nof (for Ne of), nor of, T. v. 447 n.; D 571, 660.

Noght, adv. not, 3. 572; 4. 277; A 107, 253, 1458; by no means, in no respect, A 1226, B 94, 112, 400; Noght but for, only because, D 645.

Noght, s. nothing, 3. 567; C 542; Noght worth, worth nothing, H 200.

Noise, s. noise, 5. 202; HF. 1058; Noyse, R. 1416; A 2492.

Noise, v.; Noisen, 2 pr. pl. cry aloud, B 3. m 6. 7.

Nokked, pp. notched, R. 942.

Nolde, 1 pt. s. would not, R. 501; 3. 311, 1109; D 1064; did not want, 5. 90; (I) should not desire, G 1334; Noldest, 2 pt. s. wouldst not, 3. 482; Noldestow, if thou wouldst not, T. iii. 1264; Nolde pt. s. would not, 1. 31; L. 730; B 87, 1821, 3664, D 962; would not (have), A 1024; pt. pl. would not, G 395. See Nil.

Nombre (numbrə), s. number, A 716, 2596, D 25, 32; A. pr. 9; amount, sum, A. ii. 24. 3; Noumbres, pl. A. pr. 2. See Noumbre.

Nombred, pp. numbered, counted in, T. iii. 1269. See Noumbre, v.

Nomen (numən), pp. taken, R. 394; T. v. 514; put, R 408; Nome, pp. T. iii. 606, v. 190; L. 822, 1018, 1777. Pp. of nimen.

Nones, (nòònez), for the, for the nonce, for the occasion, for this occasion, R. 709, 1111; T. iv. 185, 428; A 379, 523, 545, 879, 1423, 3126, B 1165, 3132, 4523, D 14; L. 295, 1070, 1116; for the nonce, on the spur of the moment, T. i. 561; for the time, T. ii. 1381; With the nones, on the condition, HF. 2099, L. 1540. Originally for then anes, for the once; where then is the dat. of the def. article (A.S. ðām), and ānes (once) is an adv. used as a sb.

Nonne (nunnə), s. nun, A 118, 163; Nonnes, gen. pl. nuns', B 3999; Nonnes Preest, Nun's Priest, B 4637.

Nonnerye, s. nunnery, A 3946.

Noon (nòòn), none, no, 1. 25; 5. 159; A 318, 449, B 102, I 164; pl. B 89; Non, none, 3. 941; HF. 335; A 654; or noon, or not, or no, D 2069, E 1741, F 778, I 962. A.S. nān.

Noon (nóón), s. mid-day, T. v. 472, 1114; A. ii. 39. 7. A.S. nōn.

Noot (nòòt), 1 pr. s. know not, L. 2660; A 284, 1039, 1101, B 892, 1019, 2191, 3596, 3973, C 816, F 342, H 23; Not, L. 193, 1967; 7. 319; Nost, knowest not, 3. 1137; T. iv. 642; HF. 2047; Nostow, thou knowest not, HF. 1010; Noot, pr. s. knows not, C 284; Not, 4. 214; B 3. p 2. 60; T. i. 800. A.S. nāt.

Nor, nor, A 493, &c.

Norice (nuris), s. nurse, B 1. p 3. 4; L. 1346; B 4305, D 299, E 561, 618, F 347, I 122; Norices, pl. I 613. O. F. norice.

Norice (nurissə, nurishə), v. nourish, foment, B 2204; Norished, pp. brought up, E 399.

Norissing, s. nutriment, A 437; Norissinge, nourishment, I 338, 348; Norisshinge, growth, A 3017; Norishinge, bringing up, E 1040; Norisshinges, pl. refections, B 4. p 6. 25; sustenance, B 1. p 6. 65 (Lat. fomitem).

Noriture (nurityyr), s. nourishment, T. iv. 768.

Nortelrye (nurtelriiə), s. education, A 3967.

North, B 2. m 6. 16.

North-north-west, 5. 117.

Northren, northern, A 1987.

North-ward, A 1909; A. ii. 20. 8.

Norture (nurtyyr), s. instruction, good manners, R. 179; Auctour of norture, model of good breeding, 24. 28 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi).

Nory (nuri), s. pupil (lit. foster-child), B 3. p 11. 160; Norry, B 1. p 3. 10; Norie, B 3. p 9. 119. O.F. nouri.

Nose, s. nose, A 123, 152, D 785, 2264; R. 157, 545.

Nose-thirles, pl. nostrils, A 557, I 209.

Noskinnes, for Noneskinnes, of no kind, HF. 1794. From nones, gen. of noon, none; and kinnes, gen. of kin.

Nost, Nostow, Not; see Noot.

Not, not (see Nat); Not but, only, 4. 121; T. iii. 1636.

Nota, i.e. observe, A. ii. 26. 21. Lat. nota.

Notabilitee, s. notable fact, B 4399.

Notáble, adj. notorious, remarkable, B 1875, C 156, E 2241; noteworthy, A. pr. 61.

Notaries, s. pl. scribes, I 797.

Note (nòtə), s. (1) mark, B 5. m 4. 13; note (in music), 3. 472, A 235, B 1737; musical note, peal, HF. 1720; tune, 5. 677; by n., according to musical notes, by note, R. 669; 3. 303; in concord, all at once, T. iv. 585; Notes, pl. marks, B 5. m 3. 13, m 4. 17; musical notes, R. 767.

Note (nòtə), s. (2), employment, business, task, job, A 4068. A.S. notu.

Noteful, adj. useful, B 1. p 1. 51; A. pr. 77. See above.

Notemuge, s. nutmeg, B 1953; Notemigges, pl. nutmegs, R. 1361.

Notes (nutez), s. pl. nuts, R. 1360, 1377.

Not-heed, s. crop-head, a head with hair cropped short, A 109. See note.

Nother, neither, 3. 342; 7. 253; neither (of them), L. 192.

Nothing, adv. in no respect, in no degree, not at all, 1. 171; 5. 158; 7. 105; R. 398; HF. 2032; L. 88; A 2505, B 575, 971, 2178, 3402, C 764; &c.; for n., in no wise, by no means, D 1121.

Notificacions, pl. hints, B 5. m 3. 15.

Notifye, ger. to take note of, T. ii. 1591; Notifie, pr. pl. indicate, I 430; Notifyed, pp. made known, proclaimed, B 256.

Not-withstanding, 18. 17.

Nouchis, s. pl. jewelled ornaments, jewels (properly, setting for jewels), clasps, HF. 1350; Nowches, E 382. O.F. nouche, nosche, brooch, bracelet; O.H.G. nuscha, a jewelled clasp, buckle, &c. E. ouch.

Nought, adv. not, 3. 568; T. ii. 575, 673; not at all, 3. 3; B 2262. See Noght.

Noumbre, s. number, 3. 440; 5. 381; Noumbres, pl. A. i. 7. 4. See Nombre.

Noumbre, v. number, 3. 439; Nombred, pp. counted in, T. iii. 1269.

Noun-certeyn, s. uncertainty, 18. 46; T. i. 337. See below.

Noun-power, s. lack of power, impotence, B 3. p 5. 14. Also in P. Pl.

Nouthe, now then, now, T. i. 985; as nouthe, just now, at present, A 462. A.S. nu ðā.

Novelrye, s. novelty, T. ii. 756; Novelryes, HF. 686; Novelries, F 619. O.F. novelerie.

Noveltee, s. novelty, E 1004.

Novýs, s. novice, B 3129.

Now, adv. now, A 715, 765; for now, for the present, 7. 343; now and now, from time to time, occasionally, F. 430; now or never, T. iv. 101.

Nowches; see Nouchis.

Nowher, adv. nowhere, 3. 315; A 251, 321, 360, 524.

Noyous, adj. troublesome, B 2235 n; HF. 574. Short for anoyous.

Noyse, s. noise, A 2492; R. 1416; Noise, 5. 202; HF. 1058.

Ny, adj. near, B 2562; Nye, def. the one who is near, A 3392. See Neigh, Ney.

Ny, adv. nigh, nearly, 18. 78; L. 2347; B 2735; as ny as, as close to, A 588; wel ny, almost, A 1330, E 82, F 346; Nye (for Ny, before a vowel), closely, 19. 19.

Ny, prep. nigh, B 550.

Ny for Ne I, nor I, T. iii. 173 n, 1299 n.

Nyce, adj. foolish, 4. 262; B 4. m 7. 45; T. i. 202, 1025; HF. 276, 920; L. 362; B 3712, 4505, D 938, E 2434, F 525; ignorant, R. 1257; T. i. 625; foolish, weak, B 1083, G 493, 647, 842, H 69; ludicrous, A 3855; scrupulous, A 398. O.F. nice.

Nycely, adv. foolishly, T. v. 1152.

Nycetee, s. folly, R. 12; T. i. 913; G 463, 495, H 152; simplicity, A 4046; foolish behaviour, pleasure, D 412; scrupulousness, T. ii. 1288; Nycete, folly, 3. 613; 5. 572.

Nye; see Ny.

Nyfles, pl. mockeries, pretences, D 1760. Lit. 'sniffings'; O.F. nifler, to sniff, to mock at (Godefroy).

Nymphe, s. nymph, T. iv. 1543; Nymphes, pl. A 2928.

Nyne, nine, A 24; n. night, nine days, T. iv. 588.

Nyntene, num. nineteen, L. 283.

Nynthe, ninth, T. v. 681, 1103; Ninthe, F 1283.

 

O (òò), one, A 304, 363, 738, B 52, 1135, 2122, &c.; a single, B 5. p 6. 101; one single, A. ii. 19. 12; one and the same, T. ii. 37; one continuous and uniform, HF. 1100. See Oon.

Obedient, adj. obedient, A 851; A. ii. 28. 21. In A. ii. 28. 21, it is a technical term; applied to the six eastern signs of the zodiac, as being 'subject' to the corresponding western ones.

Obeisant, adj. obedient, E 66, I 264.

Obeisaunce, s. obedience, 4. 47; T. iii. 478; L. 1375; A 2974, E 24, 502; obedient act, E 230; obedient farewell, L. 2479; Obeysaunce, F 739; in your o., in obedience to you, 2. 84; unto her o., in obedience to her, L. 587; Obeisaunces, pl. acts of obedience, acts signifying dutiful attention, L. 149; F 515; duties, observances, L. 1268.

Obeising, adj. obedient, yielding, L. 1266.

Obeye, v. obey, I. 170; ger. F 489; 1 pr. s. 6. 124; submit, B 2874; Obeyeth, pr. s. is subject to, A ii. 28. 25; Obeyde, pt. s. 7. 119; L. 681; Obeyed, F 569.

Obiecte (objectə), adj. presented, B 5. p 5. 3.

Obligacioun, s. bond, 15. 2; Obligaciouns, pl. sureties, B 3018.

Oblige, v.; o. to you, lay an obligation on you (to make me), T. iv. 1414; Oblygeth, pr. s. compels, I 847.

Obséquies, pl. funeral rites, A 993.

Observaunce, s. respect, A 1045, 1500; homage, 7. 218; observance, L. 1608; ceremony, T. ii. 112; Observance, attention, heed, I 747; Observaunces, pl. customary attentions, F 956; respectful attentions, 7. 249; duties, L. 150; Observauncez, pl. observances, A. ii. 4. 37; Observances, set duties, E 1548; attentions, F 516.

Observe, v. favour, B 1821; Observeth, pr. s. takes heed, I 303.

Obstácle, s. obstacle, E 1659; Obstácles, pl. A 1787.

Obstinat, adj. obstinate, A 521.

Occasioun, s. cause, L. 994.

Occian, s. ocean, B 4. m 6. 9.

Occident, s. west, B 297.

Occidentale, adj. western, A. i. 5. 6.

Occupye, v. take up, F 64; Occupyeth, pr. s. follows close upon (see note), T. iv. 836; Occupieth, pr. s. occupies, 2. 90; dwells in, B 424; Occupye, imp. s. hold to, B 4. p 7. 69.

Octogamye, s. marrying eight times, D 33.

Odious, adj. hateful, D 2190.

Odóur, s. L. 120; F 913; Odóures, pl. odours, L. 123.

Of, prep. of, A 2, &c.; by, R. 1260; B 4. m 1. 8; T. iv. 57; A. pr. 43; B 2132, 2751, 3782, D 661, E 70, 2436; concerning, about, F 1179; during, B 510; for, 13. 19 (see note); T. i. 1063, ii. 849, iv. 131, v. 184; A. i. 12. 3; D 895, 1861, 1868; off, from, 3. 964; A. i. 17. 29; F 1183, I 286; on account of, B 2208; I 98; in, A 87; as to, as regards, in respect of, 2. 57; 5. 317; B 90, F 425; with reference to, as to, 3. 966; 5. 299; as the result of, upon, 5. 555; over, B 1. p 3. 20; B 2947; with, A 2055, G 626; some A 146; of a purpos, on purpose, deliberately, B 2273; of al my lif, in all my life, 5. 484; of grace, by his favour, out of his favour, E 178; fulfild of, filled with, 7. 42.

Of, adv. off, away, 5. 494; (come) off, T. iv. 1106; off, A 2676; away, B 3748, 3762; com of, come off, be quick, have done, A 3728.

Of-caste, imp. s. cast off, 5. 132.

Offence, s. injury, A 1083; harm, wound, 9. 19; giving offence to, B 3. p 4. 17; hindrance, difficulty, T. iv. 199; guilt, 16. 13.

Offencioun, s. offence, crime, B 1. p 4. 200; Offensioun, damage, A 2416.

Offende, v. offend, 6. 129; Offenden, v. assail, E 1756; Offendeth, pr. s. assails, T. i. 605; Offende, pr. pl. injure, A 3065; Offended, pt. s. 7. 262; Offended, pp. attacked, A 2393; injured, A 909.

Offertorie, s. offertory, sentences of scripture said or sung after the Nicene Creed, whilst offerings were collected, A 710.

Office, s. office, employment of a secular character, A 292; employment, B 3446 (see note); function, operation, B 4. p 2. 76; duty, 5. 236; L. 383; a duty, 5. 518; property, D 1144; Offyce, office, place of office, D 1577; with o., by the use of (Lat. officio), B 1. p 1. 2; houses of o., servants' offices, E 264; Offices, pl. duties, B 1. m 6. 13.

Officere, s. officer, A 1712; Officer, B 1255; Officeres, pl. L. 1551; servants, C 480.

Offreth, imp. pl. offer ye, C 910. From infin. offren.

Offring, s. offering, the act of going up to the altar to present alms, A 450; offering at mass, I 407.

Of-newe, adv. newly, again, R. 1613; lately, E 938, G 1043; of late, D 1342. E. anew.

Of-showve, v. repel (lit. shove off), A 3912.

Of-spring, s. offspring, A 1550, H 299.

Of-taken, pp. taken off, taken away, B 1855. Cf. l. 1858.

Ofte, adj. pl. many; Ofte sythes, oftentimes, A 485; Ofte tyme, often, 3. 1158; 18. 44; A 52, D 928, I 138; Tymes ofte, E 226.

Ofte, adv. oft, 1. 34; D 861, E 722; Often, often, A 310.

Ofter, adv. comp. oftener, E 215, 620, I 1026, 1041; T. i. 125.

Of that, conj. because, L. 815.

Ofthinketh, pr. s. impers. it repents, T. i. 1050 n.

Of-thowed, pp. thawed away, HF. 1143.

Oght, s. aught, anything, F 1469; anything of value, G 1333; as adv. ought, at all, 3. 1141; 7. 294; B 1792.

Oghte; see Owen.

Oile, s. oil, C 60; Oille, A 630, 2961; Oiles, pl. G 856.

Oistre, s. oyster, A 182, D 2100; Oystres, pl. B 5. p 5. 21.

Oke, Okes; see Ook.

Old, adj. old, A 174; Olde, def. 5. 110; A 429, D 1000, 1046, 1086; voc. D 1630; pl. 5. 19, 22, 24, A 175, D 1004, F 69.

Olifaunts, s. pl. elephants, B 3. p 8. 19.

Oliveres, s. pl. olive-trees, R. 1314, 1381; olive-yards, B 3226. The O. F. oliver is used to translate Lat. oliueta (Burguy).

Olyve, s. olive-tree, 5. 181.

Omelies, s. pl. homilies, I 1088.

Omnia, all things, A 162.

Omnipotent, adj. almighty, C 576, D 423.

On, prep. on, A 12, 21, 113, &c.; in, T. v. 274; F 921; at, T. iii. 32; of, T. iii. 18; as regards, E 1424; against, T. ii. 865; towards, 4. 298; binding on, 10. 43; hir on, upon her, 3. 1217; on eve, in the evening, E 1214; on reste, at rest, F 379.

On, one; see Oon.

Onde, s. envy, R. 148. A.S. anda.

Onen, v.; Oneden, pt. pl. united, I 193; Oned, pp. united, complete, D 1968; Ooned, united, B 4. p 6. 51.

Ones (òònes), adv. once, 3. 665, 979; L. 2301; A. pr. 35; B 588, 861, 3476, 3480, G 748; of one mind, united in design, C 696; at ones, at once, R. 710; A 765, H 10. A.S. ānes.

On-fire, on fire, D 2122.

On-lofte, adv. aloft, up in the air, in the sky, 5. 203, 683; on high, T. i. 138, iv. 1221; above, T. iii. 670; above ground, E 229.

On-lyve, adv. alive, 6. 94; T. ii. 138, iv. 1237; F 932. Lit. 'in life.'

Onward, adv. forward, A 970.

Onything, A. ii. 38. 13. See Anything.

Oo, one; see Oon.

Ook (òòk), s. oak, 5. 176; T. ii. 1335, 1380, 1389; A 1702, 2290, 3017, C 765, F 159; Oke, dat. 3. 447; 5. 223; Ook (collectively), oaks, R. 1384; Okes, pl. oaks, B 1. m 6. 5. A.S. āc.

Oon (òòn), one, R. 624; 3. 39; 5. 512; A 148, B 271, 334, 2034, 3880, I 16; always the same, the same, one and the same, 3. 649; B 2142, C 333, B 2142, E 711; one o'clock, A. ii. 3. 52; united, agreed, T. ii. 1740; alone, unwedded, D 66; the same, i.e. of small consequence, 3. 1295; the same thing, alike, F 537; oon the faireste, one of the fairest, E 212; in oon, in the same state, unchangeably, A. ii. 2. 8; ever in oon, ever alike, always in the same manner, E 602, 677, F 417; continually, D 209; oon and oon, one by one, A 679; after oon, equally good, A 341; that oon, one thing, T. iv. 1453; the one, C 666; many oon, many a one, A 317, E 775; felle at oon, came to one agreement, T. iii. 565; many on, many a one, D 680; everich on, every one, B 1164; Oo, one, 3. 261, 546; HF. 2109; G 207; one, a single, R. 1236; one and the same, 3. 1293.

Ooned, pp. united, B 4. p 6. 51. See Onen.

Ooninge, s. uniting, B 4. p 6. 53. See above.

Oonly, adv. only, R. 583.

Ooth (òòth), s. oath, T. iii. 1046; L. 1638, 1644; A 120; Othes, pl. T. ii. 299; A 810, B 3018, C 472, 636, F 528.

Open, adj. open, 1. 177; A 10, B 1684.

Openen, v.; Opened, pt. s. R. 538; Openeden, pt. pl. were opened, I 329. see Opnen.

Open-ers, s. fruit of the medlar, A 3871.

Open-heeded, with head uncovered, D 645.

Opening, s. R. 544.

Openly, adv. R. 20, 502.

Operaciouns, s. pl. operations, effects, F 1129; A. i. 21. 44.

Opie, s. opium, A 1472; Opies, pl. opiates, L. 2670.

Opinioun, s. opinion, A 183, 337; notion, A 1269; belief, A 1093.

Opnen, v.; Opned, pp. opened, T. iii. 469. See Openen.

Oportunitee, s. good fortune, B 2. p 3. 27.

Opposen, v. oppose; o. me, lay to my charge, D 1597; Opposed, pt. s. examined, G 363 n; pp. objected, B 1. p 5. 34 n (a good reading).

Opposicioun, s. opposition, F 1057.

Opposit, s. opposite point, A 1894.

Oppresse, v. interfere with, suppress, 10. 60; violate, F 1411; ger. to put down, G 4; Oppressed, pp. oppressed, T. iii. 1089; violated, F 1385, 1406, 1435.

Oppressioun, s. oppression, wrong, 15. 12; L. 2592; tyranny, 10. 19; violation, L. 1868.

Or, conj. ere, before, 3. 128, 228, 1032; T. i. 832, 1071, ii. 571; HF. 101, 110; L. 1353, 1741, 2009, 2230, G 314.

Or, prep. before, R. 864; 3. 234; B 1. p 2. 17; A. ii. 23. 21.

Or, conj. or, A 91, &c.; Or ... or, either ... or, R. 261. Short for other. See Other.

Orácles, pl. oracles, HF. 11.

Oratorie, s. closet set apart for prayers, A 1905; Oratories, pl. D 694.

Oratours, s. pl. orators, pleaders, B 4. p 4. 183.

Ord, s. point; Orde, dat. L. 645. A.S. ord. And see Word.

Ordal, s. ordeal, T. iii. 1046.

Ordenaunce, s. ordinance, provision, T. iii. 535, iv. 964; regulation, 5. 390; plan, T. ii. 510; rule, 24. 17 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi); by o., in order, T. iii. 688. See Ordinaunce.

Ordenee, adj. well-ordered, B 4. p 1. 30; symmetrical, B 3. p 12. 30; Ordeynè, regulated, T. i. 892.

Ordenély, adv. conformably, in order, B 4. p 6. 195.

Ordenour, s. ruler, B 3. p 12. 71; B 4. p 1. 31.

Ordeyne, 1 pr. s. determine, B 5. p 2. 14; Ordeyneth, pr. s. disposes, overrules, B 4. p 6. 236; Ordeyned, pp. provided, A 2553; appointed, F 177; prepared, G 1277; ordered, I 336; Ordeyne (= ordeynee), pp. regulated, T. i. 892.

Ordinat, adj. ordered, regulated, B 1. m 4. 1; Ordinaat, orderly, E 1284.

Ordinatly, adv. methodically, I 1045.

Ordinaunce, s. arrangement, A 3012, B 763, 805, I 177; provision, B 250, F 903; orderly arrangement, A 2567; circumstance, B 1. p 4. 121; consideration, 18. 38; order, B 2303; resolve, B 2258; command, 10. 44. See Ordenaunce.

Ordre, s. order, law, 4. 155; A 214, 220, I 177; order, class, set, G 995; (religious or nunlike) order, T. iv. 782; I 891; by o., in order, L. 2514; B 2975; Ordres, pl. orders, A 210.

Ordred, pp. as adj. ordained, I 782, 894, 961.

Ordure, s. filthiness, I 841; mire, mud, B 1. m 7. 6; I 157; rubbish, T. v. 385.

Ore (òòrə), s. grace; thyn o., (I pray for) thy grace (see note), A 3726. A.S. ār.

Ore (óórə), s. ore (of metal), D 1064. A.S. ōr.

Ores, s. pl. oars, B 2. m 5. 14; L. 2308. A.S. ār.

Orfrays, s. gold embroidery, gold braid, fringe with golden threads, R. 462, 869, 1076. A. F. orfreis, O. F. orfrois (Godefroy); Low Lat. aurifrisium (Gloss. to Matt. Paris).

Organs, s. pl. 'organs,' the old equivalent of organ, G 134; see the note. Or it may mean 'musical instruments.'

Orgels, for Organs, G 134 n.

Orgon, pl. as sing. organ (Lat. organa), B 4041.

Orient, s. east, A 1494, B 3504. See Thorient.

Oriental, adj. eastern; (hence) of superior quality, L. 221 (see note); Orientale, adj. Eastern, A. i. 5. 4.

Original, s. cause, C 500.

Orisonte, s. horizon, T. v. 276; Orizonte, A. pr. 7; A. i. 18. 4; F 1017 n.

Orisoun, s. prayer, A 2372, D 1786, F 1026; Orison, A 2261 n; Orisouns, pl. B 596, I 1038; Orisons, B 537, E 1706.

Orizon rectum, or right horizon, A. ii. 26. 21. This means the horizon of any place situate on the equator, which could be represented by a straight line upon a disc or 'table' of the astrolabe.

Orloge, s. clock, 5. 350; Orlogge, B 4044. F. horloge.

Ornaments, pl. L. 1107; Ornamentes, E 258.

Orphelin, adj. orphaned, B 2. p 3. 21. F. orphelin.

Orpiment, s. orpiment, G 759, 774, 823. 'Orpiment, trisulphide of arsenic; it occurs in nature as an ore of arsenic, and is usually in combination with realgar, or red sulphuret of arsenic'; Webster.

Oruscupum, i.e. horoscope, A. ii. 3. rub.

Osanne, i.e. Hosannah, B 642. A Hebrew phrase; meaning 'save, we pray.'

Ost, s. host, army, 9. 40; B 1. p. 3. 48; T. iv. 29; HF. 186; L. 1906; Ostes, pl. armies, B 4. m 4. 9.

Ostelments, s. pl. furniture, household goods, B 2. p 5. 85 (L. supellectilis). O. F. ostillement, ostilement (Godefroy); E. hustlement; cf. F. outil.

Ostesse, s. hostess, B 4. m 3. 16. See Hostesse.

Otes, s. pl. oats, C 375; (of) oats, D 1963.

Other, adj. second, R. 953, 976; the other, A 427; Other, A 113; what o., what else, T. i. 799; that o., the other, F 496; Other, pl. others, 3. 891; 5. 228; R. 1304; Othere, pl. other, A 794, D 866; others, HF. 2151; B 3344, 3510; gen. pl. others', HF. 2153; Otheres, gen. sing., each other's (lit. of the other), C 476. A.S. ōðer.

Other, conj. or, 3. 810; 4. 219; either, L. 35 a; Other ... or, either ... or, G 1149. See Or.

Other-weys, adv. diversely, in one way (or other), B 5. p 4. 101; Otherweyes, otherwise, B 2255, E 1072.

Other-whyle, adv. sometimes, B 2. p 1. 78. Occurs in P. Pl. See Outherwhyle.

Otherwyse, adv. on any other condition, F 534.

Othes; see Ooth.

Ouche, s. nouch, clasp, D 743. Put for Nouche; see Nouchis.

Ought, s. anything, 3. 459; as adv. at all, 3. 537, 549; T. ii. 268; in ought that, in as far as, T. iii. 1241. See Oght.

Oughtestow, oughtest thou, T. v. 545; L. 1957. See Owen.

Oule, s. owl, 5. 343; D 1081; Owle, T. v. 319; L. 2253; Oules, pl. 5. 599; T. v. 382; F. 648; Owles, pl. B 4282. A.S. ūle.

Oules, pl. awls; hence, spiked irons for tormenting men, D 1730. A.S. awel.

Ounces, pl. small portions, A 677; ounces, G 756; R. 1118.

Ounded, pp. wavy, T. iv. 736. See below.

Oundinge, s. adornment with waved lines, I 417. Cf. oundy as an heraldic term. See below.

Oundy, adj. wavy, HF. 1386. F. ondé, 'waved'; Cotgrave.

Oure, pron. ours, 5. 545; T. iv. 539; our, L. 900; Our, our, A 34, &c.; Oures, ours, C 786. A.S. ūre.

Out, adv. out, A 45, &c.; used for come out, HF. 2139; B 1350; go out, T. iv. 210; fully, T. iii. 417; mordre wil out, murder will out, B 1766; Out and out, entirely, T. ii. 739.

Out, interj. alas! A 3825, E 2366; Out! harrow! B 4570.

Out of, prep. without, C 157; out of, A 452.

Out-breke, v. break out, break silence, 2. 12.

Out-breste, v. burst out, T. iv. 237.

Out-bringe, v. utter, L. 1835; utter (something), T. iii. 99, 107.

Outcast, pp. cast out, rejected, B 3. p. 4. 30 n; cast out, T. v. 615; abject, B 3. p 4. 60.

Out-caughte, pt. s. caught out, drew out, B 1861.

Out-drawe, pp. drawn out, T. iv. 1226.

Oute, adv. away, T. v. 553; out, i.e. uttered, D 977.

Outen, v. put out, utter, display, exhibit, G 834; utter, E 2438; Oute, 1 pr. s. utter, offer, D 521. A.S. ūtian.

Outer, adj. outer, T. iii. 664.

Outereste, adj. superl. uttermost, farthest, B 2. m 6. 11. See Outtereste.

Outerly, adv. utterly, entirely, E 335, 639, 768, 953.

Outfleyinge, s. flying out, HF. 1523.

Out-hees, s. outcry, hue and cry, alarm, A 2012. Cf. Owl and Nightingale, 1683, 1698; hence Low Lat. hutesium, uthesium (Matt. Paris).

Outher, conj. either, R. 250; 22. 79; T. ii. 857; iv. 510, 531; A 1485, 1593, B 2286; or, 3. 1100; T. ii. 1351; Outher ... or, either ... or, B 1136, 1137, C 213. See Other.

Outherwhyle, adv. sometimes, B. 2733, 2857. See Otherwhyle.

Outlandish, adj. foreign, 9. 22.

Outlawe, s. outlaw, H 224.

Outrage, s. excess (luxu), B 2. m 5. 3; 9. 5; inordinateness, B 2. p 5. 88; cruelty, injustice, R. 1229; A 2012.

Outrageous, adj. excessive, 5. 336; B 2180, C 650, E 2087, I 430; superfluous, B 4. p 6. 253; immoderate, I 743; violent, rampant, R. 174; excessively bold, R. 1257.

Outrageously, adv. excessively, A 3998.

Outrance, s. great hurt, excessive injury, 24. 26 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi).

Outrayen, v. be outrageous, incur disgrace, B 3. p 6. 37; Outraye, v. lose temper, E 643. O.F. outreer, to surpass (Godefroy).

Outrely, adj. utterly, T. ii. 1004; B 4419, C 849, D 664, I 234, 247; entirely, T. iii. 1486; B 2943, 3072; thoroughly, B 5. p 4. 5; absolutely, B 5. p 4. 13; decidedly, B 2210. Cf. O.F. outrement.

Out-ringe, v. ring out, T. iii. 1237.

Out-rood, pt. s. rode out, T. v. 604.

Out-rydere, s. rider abroad, A 166. The name of a monk who rode to inspect granges, &c.; see note.

Out-springe, v. come to light, T. i. 745; Out-sprong, pt. s. spread abroad, C 111.

Out-sterte, pt. pl. started out, B 4237.

Out-straughte, pt. s. stretched out, R. 1515. From infin. outstrecche.

Out-taken, pp. excepted (lit. taken out), B 277; Out-take, (being) excepted, R. 948.

Outtereste, adj. final, ultimate, B 4. p 4. 39; outermost, A. i. 21. 22; Outterest, outermost, B 3. p 10. 21; B 4. p 6. 85; extrinsic, B 3. p 12. 142.

Out-twyne, 2 pr. pl. twist out, utter, 12. 11.

Outward, adv. outwardly, R. 419.

Out-wende, v. come out, proceed, HF. 1645.

Oven, s. oven; Ovene, dat. I 856. A.S. ofen.

Over, prep. above, R. 1475; 3. 891; A ii. 23. 10; B 277, 2487; beyond, D 1661; besides, F 137; Over hir might, to excess, C 468; Over that, beyond that, B 3. p 2. 7.

Over, adv. very, exceedingly, B 2655; over, on, B 1633.

Over, adj. upper, A 133; Overest, superl. uppermost, A 290.

Over-al, adv. everywhere, R 1580; 3. 171, 426; 5. 172, 284; 13. 4; L. 120, 1024, 1424; B 2. p 5. 17; A 216, 249, 1207, D 237, G 507; everywhere, in all directions, T. i. 928; on all sides, D 264; Overal, in every way, E 2129; in every respect, throughout, E 1048; Over al and al, beyond every other, 3. 1003.

Over-blowe, pp. blown over, past, L. 1287.

Over-bord, adv. over-board, HF. 438; Over-borde, L. 644.

Overbyde, ger. to survive, D 1260 n.

Overcaste, v. overcast, sadden, A 1536.

Overcomen, v. overcome, R. 393; Overcom, pt. s. overcame, L. 2147; Overcomen, pp. defeated, B 4. p 6. 160; Overcome, overcome, L. 2019; A 3135; come to pass, T. iv. 1069.

Overcomer, s. conqueror, B 1. m 2. 10; B 4. m 7. 27.

Overdoon, pp. overdone, carried to excess, G 645.

Over-gilt, adj. worked over with gold, R. 873.

Over-goon, v. pass away, T. i. 846; overspread, B 2. p 7. 26; Overgo, v. pass away, T. iv. 424.

Over-greet, adj. too great, G 648.

Over-haste, s. too much haste, T. i. 972.

Overkerveth, pr. s. cuts across, crosses, A. i. 21. 56, ii. 26. 23.

Overlad, pp. put upon, B 3101. Lit. led over. See P. Plowm. B. iii. 314; and Prompt. Parv.

Overlade, v. overload, L. 621.

Overlight, adj. too light, too feeble, B 4. m 3. 23.

Over-loked, pp. looked over, perused, 3. 232.

Overlonge, adv. too long, B 3. m 7. 5.

Over-lowe, adv. too low, B 3. m 9. 17.

Overlyeth, pr. s. overlies, lies upon, I 575.

Overmacche, v. to overmatch, overreach, conquer, E 1220.

Over-olde, adj. out of date, B 1. p 3. 41.

Over-passeth, pr. s. surpasses, B 5. p 6. 74; exceeds, oversteps, B 4. p 7. 70.

Over-raughte, pt. s. reached over, hence, urged on, T. v. 1018.

Over-riden, pp. ridden over, A 2022.

Over-shake, pp. caused to pass away, shaken off, 5. 681.

Overshote, pp.; had overshote hem, had over-run the scent, 3. 383. From infin. oversheten.

Over-skipte, 1 pt. s. skipped over, omitted, 3. 1208.

Oversloppe, s. upper-garment, G 633. See note. Cf. Icel. yfir-sloppr, an upper or over-garment; cf. E. slop, in the compound 'slop-shop.' See Sloppes.

Oversprede, v. spread over, cover, E 1799; Over-sprat, pr. s. overspreadeth, T. ii. 767; Over-spradde, pt. s. covered, A 2871; overspread, T. ii. 769; spread over, A 678.

Overspringe, pr. s. subj. overpass, F 1060.

Overstreccheth, pr. s. extends over, B 2. p 7. 27.

Over-swifte, adj. pl. over-swift, very swift, B 4. m 5. 6.

Over-swimmen, pr. pl. fly through, B 5. m 5. 5.

Overtake, v. overtake, attain to, G 682; Overtook, 1 pt. s. caught up, 3. 360.

Overte, adj. open, HF. 718.

Overthrowe, v. be overturned, be ruined, HF. 1640; Overthrowe, pp. overthrown, T. iv. 385, v. 1460; ruined, B 2. m 1. 12 (Lat. stratus).

Over-throwinge, adj. overwhelming, B 1. m 2. 1; headlong (Lat. praecipiti), B 2. m 7. 1; headstrong (Lat. praecipiti), B 1. m 6. 15; headlong, pre-inclined, B 4. p 6. 207; revolving, B 3. m 12. 26.

Overthrowinge, s. falling down, B 2755; Overthrowinges, pl. destruction (Lat. ruinis), B 2. m 4. 11.

Overthwart, adv. across, A. i. 5. 1; A. ii. 38. 19; A 1991; opposite, T. iii. 685; askance, R. 292; Overthwert, across, 3. 863.

Overtymeliche, adv. untimely, B 1. m 1. 11.

Over-whelveth, pr. s. overturns, turns over, agitates, B 2. m 3. 13. (See note.)

Owen, v. owe, own, possess; Oweth, pr. s. owns, possesses, C 361; Oweth, pr. s. refl. it is incumbent (on him), L 360 a; Owen, 1 pr. pl. owe, D 2106; Owen, pr. pl. ought, B 2. p 5. 53; Oghte, 1 pt. s. ought, 4. 216; Oughtestow, 2 pt. s. oughtest thou, T. v. 545; L. 1957; Oghte, pt. s. impers. it were necessary, B 2188; him oghte, he ought, L. 377; I 84; it became him, B 1097; hir oghte, became her, E 1120; us oughte, it behoved us, we ought, 1. 119; hem oghte, they ought, G 1340; us oghte (subj.), it should behove us, we ought, E 1150; Oghte, pt. s. owed, L. 589, 1609; ought, 3. 678; A 505, 660, I 142; Oughten, 1 pt. pl. G 6; Oghte, 2 pt. pl. L. 70; Oghten, 2 pt. pl. 4. 282; Oghten, pt. pl. B 1833; Oughten, pt. pl. B 3567; Oghte, pt. pl. I 133; Owed, pp. due, B 4. p 5. 11. See āȝen and āh in Stratmann. [In B 2253, I employ the phrase I ne owe nat to supply a gap, meaning 'I ought not.' A better spelling is ow, as representing the A.S. āh.]

Owene, adj. def. own, C 834, D 1091, E 504, 652, G 1091; myn owene woman, independent, T. ii. 750; Owne, def. B 1058; Owene, dat. B 3198, 3571; his owne hand, with his own hand, A 3624; Owene, pl. B 3584, G 1154.

Owh, interj. alas, B 1. p 6. 17; B 4. p 2. 1. Cf. E. ugh!

Owher, adv. anywhere, 3. 776; L. 1540; A 653, G 858; Owhere (with e added), R. 516. A.S. āhwǣr.

Owle; see Oule.

Owne; see Owene.

Oxe, s. ox, C 354; T. v. 1469; Oxes, gen. E 207, 291; Oxen, pl. A 887.

Oxe-stalle, s. ox-stall, E 398. (Four syllables.)

Oynement, s. ointment, unguent, 12. 7; A 631, I 502.

Oynons, pl. onions, A 634.

Oystres, s. pl. oysters, B 5. p 5. 21. See Oistre.

 

Paas, s. pace, step, L. 284; footpace, G 575 (see note); goon a paas, go at a footpace, C 866. See Pas.

Pace, v. pass, go, L. 746; A 1602; pass, T. i. 371; go away, 15. 9; 21. 9; A 4409; pass away, A 175; surpass, go beyond, T. iii. 1272; walk, T. v. 1791; overstep, HF. 392; come, HF. 720; p. of, pass over, T. ii. 1568; Pace, ger. to go, walk, T. v. 537; to go, B 1759, F 120; to pass, L. 1914; HF. 841; of this thing to p., to pass this over in review, HF. 239; to pace of, to pass from, B 205; Pace, 1 pr. s. pass over (it), go on, HF. 1355; proceed, go on, A 36; 1 pr. s. subj. depart, F 494; 2 pr. s. subj. go, D 911; pr. s. subj. may depart, E 1092; Passed, pt. s. surpassed, A 448; pp. crossed, A 464. See Passen.

Pacience, s. patience, A 1084, F 773; took pacience, kept his patience, B 2. p 7. 93; took in p., took patiently, B 3155; was perfectly resigned, 4. 40.

Pacient, adj. patient, T. iii. 142; A 484.

Pacient, s. patient, T. i. 1090; A 415.

Paciently, adv. patiently, 4. 21.

Page, s. page (boy), L. 2037; A 3972, B 1236, D 2178, E 1444, F 692.

Paillet, s. pallet, T. iii. 229.

Paire, s. pair, A 473, 4386; set, 159; as pl. pairs, 5. 238. (Pair, in the sense of 'set,' is applied to many things of the same size.)

Paisible, adj. peaceable, 9. 1.

Pak, s. pack, set, L. 299 a.

Palais, s. palace, 1. 183; Palays, B 1. p 4. 69. See Paleys.

Palasye, s. palsy, R. 1098.

Pale, s. perpendicular stripe, HF. 1840. Still used in heraldry; see note.

Pale, adj. pale, R. 306; A 205; T. iii. 624.

Pale, v.; Paleth, pr. s. renders pale, B 2. m 3. 2.

Palestral, adj. athletic, pertaining to wrestling, T. v. 304. From Lat. palaestra.

Paleys, s. palace, T. v. 540; HF. 713; L. 1096, 2406; A 2199, 2494, 2513, E 197, F 60; mansion (in astrology), 4. 54, 145; Palais, 1. 183; Palays, B 1. p 4. 69.

Paleys-, or Paleis-chaumbres, pl. palace-chambers, 9. 41.

Paleys-gardyn, palace-garden, T. ii. 508.

Paleys-ward, to, toward the palace, T. ii. 1252.

Paleys-yates, pl. gates of the palace, 4. 82.

Palfrey, s. palfrey, horse, A 207, 4074; L. 1116, 1198.

Palinge, s. adorning with (heraldic) pales, or upright stripes, I 417. See Pale, s., above.

Palis, s. palisade, stockade, B 1. p 6. 28; paling, rampart, B 1. p 3. 56 (see note), p 5. 22; B 2. m 4. 12. O.F. palis, paleis; whence palisser, v.

Palled, pp. pale, languid, H 55. See Appalled.

Palm, s. palm-tree, 5. 182; palm-branch, G 240.

Palmers, pl. palmers, A 13.

Palpable, adj. capable of being felt, HF. 869.

Palude, s. marsh, B 4. m 7. 23 n.

Pament, s. pavement, F 1374 n.

Pan, s. brain-pan, skull, A 1165, B 3142.

Panade, s. kind of knife (see note), A 3929, 3960.

Panier, s. pannier, E 1568; Paniers, pl. panniers, baskets for bread, HF. 1939.

Panne, s. pan, A 3944, D 1614, 1623, G 1210. A.S. panna.

Pans, pl. pence, T. iii. 1375 n. See Peny.

Panter, s. bag-net for birds, L. 131 (see note); Panteres, pl. nets, R. 1621. O.F. pantiere.

Papeiay (papejei), s. popinjay, B 1559, 1957, E 2332; Papingay (papinjei), R. 81. Properly a parrot; applied in England to the green wood-pecker (Gecinus viridis). See Popiniay.

Paper, s. account-book, A 4404; Papeer, paper, G 762; Papir, paper, T. v. 1597; I 445.

Paper-whyt, adj. white as paper, L. 1198.

Papingay, s. popinjay, R. 81. See Papeiay.

Par, by (in par consequence), A. ii. 38. 21. See Per.

Par amour; see Paramour.

Par cas, by chance, C 885; per cas, L. 1967.

Par companye, for company, A 3839, 4167.

Par dieux!, T. ii. 759. See Pardee.

Parábles, pl. parables, D 369.

Paradys, s. paradise, R. 443; 1. 155; T. iv. 864; HF. 918; L. 564, 1103; B 2695, 3200, D 1915, F 912, I 325.

Paráge, s. kindred, birth, D 250; rank, D 1120. 'Parage, famille, parenté, noble naissance'; Godefroy.

Paraments, pl. mantles, splendid clothing, A 2501. 'Parement, Parament, parure, vêtement, et, en particulier, habit, long et riche manteau en forme de dalmatique que l'on posait sur l'armure dans les grandes solennités ou dans les combats'; Godefroy. See Parements.

Paramour (for par amour), adv. for love, B 2033; longingly, B 1933; with devotion, A 1155; Paramours, passionately, T. v. 332; A 2112; with excessive devotion, L 260 a (see note); by way of passionate love, T. v. 158; for p., for the sake of passion, E 1450; for paramours, for love's sake, A 3354. The O.F. paramor or paramors was used rather vaguely; we even find, from an example in Godefroy (s.v. Amor), that it could be used to mean 'if you please.'

Paramour, s. (1) concubine, wench, D 454, 1372; Paramours, pl. A 3756, 3758, B 4057; lovers, paramours, T. ii. 236; Paramour (2), love-making, A 4372, 4392.

Paraunter, perhaps, 3. 779, 788; T. i. 619, iii. 491; L. 362. See below.

Paraventure, peradventure, perhaps, 3. 556; HF. 792; B 190, D 1003, 1073, E 284, F 955. See above; and see Peraventure.

Parcel, s. part, F 852, I 1006; small part, 2. 106; Parcelle, A. i. 21. 51.

Parchemin, s. parchment, B 5. m 4. 9.

Pardee (F. par Dieu), a common oath, A 563, 3084, B 1977, C 240, E 1234, F 696; L. 508; Parde, 3. 721; 5. 509, 571; L. 16; B 3974, C 672; Pardieux, T. i. 197; Par dieux, T. ii. 759. Dieux is from Lat. Deus, nom.; dieu, from Deum, acc.

Pardoner, s. pardoner, seller of indulgences, A 543, 669; C 318; Pardoneer, C 932.

Pardoun, s. pardon, A 687, C 906; Pardon, C 927.

Paregal, adj. fully equal, T. v. 840. 'Parivel, Parigal, Paregal, tout à fait égal'; Godefroy.

Parements, s. pl. rich hangings or ornaments, (applied to a chamber), L. 1106; F 269. 'Chambre de parements, chambre de parade'; Godefroy. See Paraments.

Parentele, s. kinship, I 908. 'Parentel, parenté, lignée, parent'; Godefroy.

Parfey, by my faith, in faith, HF. 938; I 497; Parfay, B 110, 849. A.F. par fei.

Parfit, adj. perfect, 2. 38; 5. 568; B 3. p 10. 2, 13, 16; HF. 44; A 72, 422, 532, 3072, B 2710, D 92, F 871, G 353, I 50, 107; Parfýt, A 338.

Parfitly, adv. perfectly, R. 771; E 690; fully, I 1007; wholly, B 2381; in a perfect way, D 111.

Parfourne, v. perform, B 2402; Parfourne, ger. to fulfil, B 3137, H 190; p. up, complete, D 2261; Párfournest, 2 pr. s. performest, B 1797; Parfourned (párfourn'd), pt. s. performed, completed, E 2052; Parfóurned, pp. B 1646, C 151; completed, D 2104, E 1795; Parforme, imp. s. perform, T. iii. 417. 'Parfournir, to perform, consummate'; Cotgrave. See Perfourne.

Parfourninge, s. performance, I 807.

Parish-chirche, s. parish-church, A 3307.

Parish-clerk, s. A 3312, 3348.

Parisshe, s. parish, A 449, 491.

Parisshens, pl. parishioners, A 482. 'Paroissien, a parishioner'; Cotgrave.

Paritorie, s. pellitory, Parietaria officinalis, G 581. 'In rural districts an infusion of this plant is a favourite medicine'; Flowers of the Field, by C. A. Johns. 'Paritoire, pellitory of the wall'; Cotgrave. From Lat. paries, a wall.

Park, s. F 392; Parke, dat. park, 5. 122; Parkes, pl. F 1190.

Parlement, s. (1) deliberation, decision due to consultation, A 1306; (2) parliament, T. iv. 143, 211, 217; p. of Briddes, Parliament of Birds, I 1086.

Parlour, s. T. ii. 82.

Parodie, s. period, duration (see note), T. v. 1548.

Parsoneres, s. pl. partners, partakers, B 5. p 5. 62. 'Parçonier, parsonier, parsoner, qui participe'; Godefroy.

Part, s. party, side, B 1. p 3. 25; share, T. v. 1318; 6. 38; 25. 1 (see vol. iv. p. xxvii); Parte, dat. A 2582.

Parten, v. share, T. i. 589; ger. To p. with, participate in, L. 465; Parte, 1 pr. s. part, depart, T. i. 5; Parteth, pr. s. departs, L. 359; Parted, pp. dispersed, T. i. 960; gone away, taken away, L. 1110.

Parteners, s. pl. partners, partakers, I 968. (For parceners.) See Parsoneres.

Participacioun, s. participation, B 3. p 10. 110.

Particuler, adj. special, E 34.

Partie; see Partye.

Parting-felawes, s. pl. fellow-partakers, I 637.

Part-les, adj. without his share, B 4. p 3. 27.

Partrich, s. partridge, A 349; Partriches, gen. pl. HF. 1392.

Party, adv. partly, A 1053. O.F. parti, pp. masc.

Partye, s. portion, A 3008; part, side, B 5. p 3. 27; partial umpire, taker of a side, A 2657; Partie, part, A. i. 18. 7; share (Lat. partem), B 1. p 3. 27; Party, part, portion, B 2. p 4. 77; portion, T. ii. 394; part, B 17; Parties, pl. parts, A. pr. 19; B 2560; parties, B 2204. O. F. partie, fem.

Parvys, church-porch, A 310. 'Parvis, the porch of a church'; Cotgrave. See note.

Pas (paas), s. pace, B 399, C 164; step, D 2162; distance, R. 525; foot-pace, A 825; grade, degree, 4. 134; grade, I 532; passage, B 2635; a pas, at a footpace, T. ii. 627, v. 60; F 388; Pas, pl. paces, yards, A 1890; thousand pas, a mile, B 1. p 4. 173; movements, B 306; degrees, 4. 121. See Paas.

Passage, s. way, R. 502; stage, period, R. 406.

Passant, pres. pt. as adj. surpassing, A 2107. See below.

Passen, ger. to surpass, exceed, conquer, A 3089; v. surpass, L. 1127; overcome, L. 162; outdo, G 857; pass away, B 2. p 1. 55; Passe, v. surpass, B 4501; Passe of, 1 pr. s. pass by, F 288; Passeth, pr. s. passes away, F 404; exceeds, A. ii. 42. 15; surpasses, L. 275; Passen, pr. pl. move over, B 5. m 5. 1; Passed, pt. s. surpassed, A 448; Paste, pt. s. passed, T. ii. 658; passed by, T. ii. 398; Passing, pres. pt. surpassing, A 2885, E 240; Passed, pp. past, spent, E 610; past, T. i. 24; surpassed, 7. 82; passed by, 5. 81; overblown, gone off, R. 1682. See Pace. And see below.

Passing, adj. surpassing, excellent, F 929, G 614; extreme, E 1225. See above.

Passioun, s. suffering, 16. 4; B 1175; passion, 1. 162; passive feeling, B 5. p 5. 5; passive feeling, impression, B 5. m 4. 32.

Pastee, s. pasty, A 4346.

Pasture, s. B 3123, E 1313, I 792.

Patente, s. patent, A 315, C 337. A letter of privilege, so called because open to all men's inspection.

Paternoster, the Lord's prayer, A 3485; (the devil's), I 507; as interj. i.e. say a paternoster, A 3638.

Path, s. B 3. p 2. 60; T. ii. 37; L. 2463; Pathes, pl. A. pr. 28; I 77.

Patriarkes, pl. patriarchs, C 343.

Patrimoine, s. patrimony, I 790.

Patroun, s. patron, 4. 275; protector, 7. 4; Patron, pattern, 3. 910. F. patron, 'a patron, ... also a pattern'; Cot.

Paunche, s. paunch, belly, 5. 610.

Pave, v. pave, G 626; Paved, pp. R. 126; T. ii. 82.

Pavëment, s. B 85, 1867, D 2104; (pav'ment), F 1374.

Pawes, s. pl. paws, HF. 541.

Pawmes, pl. palms (of the hand), T. iii. 1114.

Pax, s. the 'osculatorium,' or 'pax-brede,' a disk of metal or other substance, used at Mass for the 'kiss of peace,' I 407.

Pay, s. pleasure, 5. 271; 18. 70; more to pay, so as to give more satisfaction, 5. 474. See below.

Paye, v. pay, A 806; Payed, pt. s. A 539; pp. satisfied, pleased, 9. 3; holde her payd, think herself satisfied, 3. 269; Payed, rendered favourable, T. ii. 682; Payd, satisfied, D 1185.

Payement, s. payment, D 131; Payements, pl. B 3151.

Payen, adj. pagan, A 2370.

Payens, s. pl. pagans, L. 786, 1688; T. v. 1849; A. ii. 4. 37; B 534.

Payndemayn, s. bread of a peculiar whiteness, B 1915. See note. From Lat. panis Dominicus.

Payne, s. pain; dide his payne, took pains, F 730. See Peyne.

Payre, s. a pair, R. 1386; 3. 1289; Paire, pl. pairs, R. 1698; Payr, pl. R. 66. See Peyre.

Pece, s. piece, 5. 149; Peces, pl. parts, B 5. p 4. 114; pieces, T. i. 833; I 356.

Peches, pl. peaches, R. 1374.

Pecok, s. peacock, 5. 356; T. i. 210; A 3926.

Pecok-arwes, pl. arrows with peacocks' feathers, A 104.

Pecunial, adj. pecuniary, D 1314.

Peer (péér), s. equal, A 4026, B 1930, 4040. See Pere.

Pees (pèès), s. peace, 1. 69; 3. 615; A 532, 1447, B 130, 2479, 3524, 3826, G 44; in p., in silence, B 228.

Pees (pèès), peace! hush! be still! T. i. 753, B 836, D 838, 850, G 951.

Pekke, s. peck (quarter of a bushel), A 4010.

Pekke, imp. s. peck, pick, B 4157.

Pel, s. peel, small castle, HF. 1310. Lowland Sc. peil; O.F. pel; from Lat. acc. pālum.

Pelet, s. pellet, stone cannon-ball, HF. 1643. See Gloss. to P. Plowman.

Penaunce, s. penance, A 223, F 942, I 104; sorrow, 7. 347; suffering, grief, torment, 1. 82; A 1315, F 740; trouble, 18. 79; self-abasement, L. 2077; pain, 12. 14; weakness (of sight), 10. 36; Penance, L. 479; I 103; Penaunces, pl. miseries, T. i. 201.

Penaunt, s. a penitent, one who does penance, B 3124. O.F. peneant, penant, penitent; Godefroy.

Pencel (1), s. pencil, brush, A 2049. O.F. pincel, F. pinceau.

Pencel (2), s. small banner, sleeve worn as a token. Short for penoncel. See Penoun.

Pénible, adj. painstaking, B 3490; Peníble, painstaking, careful to please, E 714; Penýble, inured, D 1846. O.F. penible, 'en parlant des personnes, dur à la peine, infatigable'; Godefroy. 'Penible, painful, laborious'; Cotgrave.

Penitauncer, s. confessor who assigns a penance, I 1008.

Penitence, s. 1. 120; penance, I 101, 126; repentance, I 107, 109.

Penitent, adj. 1. 147.

Penitent, s. 1. 61; Penitents, pl. 1. 184.

Penne, s. pen, quill, T. iv. 13; L. 2357, 2491, E 1736. 'Penne, a quill'; Cotgrave.

Penner, s. pen-case, E 1879.

Penoun, s. pennon, ensign or small flag borne at the end of a lance, A 978. O.F. penon.

Pens; see Peny.

Pensif, adj. pensive, F 914 n.

Peny, s. penny, R. 451; D 1575, F 1616; money, A 4119; Penyes, pl. pence, R. 189; Pens, pl. pence, T. iii. 1375, C 376, D 1573, 1599.

Penyble; see Penible.

Peple, s. people, C 260; Peples, gen. sing. E 412; Peples, pl. nations, 9. 2; people, A 2513; Peples, gen. pl. of the nations, 7. 52.

Per cas, by chance, L. 1967; par cas, C 885.

Per consequens, consequently, D 2192; par c., A. ii. 38. 21.

Peraventure, adv. perhaps, HF. 304; C 935, H 71, I 105. See Paraventure.

Percen, v. pierce, B 2014, F 237; Perce, v. E 1204; Perceth, pr. s. pierces with his gaze, 5. 331; Percen, pr. pl. G 111; Perced, pt. s. pierced, T. i. 272; pp. A. i. 3. 1, 13. 2; A 2, B 1745.

Perchaunce, adv. by chance, hence, probably, doubtless, A 475.

Perche, s. perch (for birds to rest on), A 2204, B 4074; wooden bar (as of a clothes-horse), R. 225; a rod placed high up in a horizontal position, A. ii. 23. 27. Lat. pertica.

Perched, pp. perched, HF. 1991.

Percher, s. mortar, T. iv. 1245 n. (A kind of large wax-candle; see Nares and Halliwell.)

Percinge, s. piercing; for percinge = to prevent any piercing, B 2052.

Perdurable, adj. imperishable, B 1. p 1. 15; everlasting, eternal, B 1. m 5. 2; B 3. m 9. 2; B 2699, I 75, 119, 124; Perdurables, adj. pl. everlasting, I 811.

Perdurabletee, s. immortality, B 2. p 7. 63, 73.

Perdurably, adv. permanently, B 3. p 6. 23; eternally, B 5. p 4. 117.

Pere (péérə), s. peer, equal, 1. 97; 19. 11; R. 1300; T. v. 1803; B 3244, F 678. See Peer.

Peregryn, adj. peregrine, i.e. foreign, F 428. Lat. peregrinus.

Pere-ionette (peer-jonettə), s. a kind of early-ripe pear, A 3248. See note.

Peres, pl. pears, R. 1375, E 2331.

Perfeccioun, s. B 2709.

Perfit, adj. perfect, complete, A. i. 18. 2. See Parfit.

Perfitly, adv. perfectly, A. pr. 14. See Parfitly.

Perfourne, ger. to perform, B 2256; Performe, v. achieve, B 3. p 2. 64; shew, be equivalent to, A. ii. 10. 10; Perfourmed, pp. performed, R. 1178; Performed, L. 2138. See Parfourne.

Peril, s. T. ii. 606, B 2672; in p., in danger, 4. 108; upon my p., (I say it) at my peril, D 561.

Perilous, adj. dangerous, 1. 7; 4. 199; A 3961, B 1999, 3109; Perílous, 2. 83.

Perisse, v. perish, I 254; pr. pl. C 99.

Perle, s. pearl, L. 221; Perles, pl. B 3. m 8. 10; A 2161, B 3658, D 345.

Perled, pp. fitted with pearl-like drops, A 3251.

Permutacioun, s. change, 15. 19; T. v. 1541.

Perpendiculer, adj. perpendicular, A. ii. 23. 3.

Perpetuel, adj. perpetual, I 137.

Perpetuely, perpetually, 4. 20; T. iii. 1754; permanently, B 3. p 5. 3; Perpetuelly, A 1024, 1342.

Perréé, s. jewellery, precious stones, gems, B 3495, 3550, 3556, D 344; Perré, HF. 124; L. 1201. (Variant of Perrye.)

Perrýë, s. jewellery, A 2936; Perrie, HF. 1393. O.F. pierrie, short form of pierrerie: Godefroy.

Pers, adj. of Persian dye, light-blue, R. 67. 'Pers, skie-coloured': Cotgrave.

Pers, s. stuff of a sky-blue colour, A 439, 617. 'Robes de pers,' Rom. de la Rose, 9118.

Persecucion, s. persecution, D 1909.

Perséveraunce, s. endurance, T. i. 44; constancy, 3. 1007; 24. 8 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi); continuance, G 443.

Persévere, v. continue, D 148; Persévereth, pr. s. lasts, C 497; Persévere, imp. s. continue, T. i. 958.

Perséveringe, s. perseverance, G 117.

Persly, s. parsley, A 4350.

Persóne, s. person, figure, T. ii. 701; person, D 1161, E 73; Pérsone, A 521; Pérsoun, parson, A 478; Person, parson, A 3943, 3977, I 23; Pérsone, B 1170.

Persuasioun, s. persuasion, belief, HF. 872.

Pert, adj. forward, frisky, A 3950. Short for apert.

Pertinacie, s. pertinaciousness, I 391.

Pertinent, adj. fitting, B 2204.

Pertourbe, ger. to perturb, T. iv. 561; Perturben, 2 pr. pl. disturb, A 906.

Perturbacioun, s. trouble, B 1. p 1. 62; Perturbaciouns, pl. B 1. p 5. 51.

Perturbinge, s. perturbation, D 2254.

Pervenke, s. periwinkle, R. 903; Pervinke, R. 1432. 'Pervenche, periwinkle, or peruinckle': Cotgrave.

Pervers, adj. perverse, self-willed, 3. 813.

Perverten, v. pervert, B 2379.

Pervinke, s. periwinkle, R. 1432. See Pervenke.

Pesen, pl. peas, L. 648. A.S. piosan, pl. of piose.

Pesible, adj. calm (lit. peaceable), B 1. p 5. 2. See Peysible.

Pestilence, s. the (great) pestilence, A 442, C 679; pestilence, 16. 14; harm, C 91; plague, curse, B 4600, D 1264; mischief, plague, B 4. m 3. 15.

Peter, interj. by St. Peter, B 1404, G 665 (see note); HF. 1034.

Peticiouns, pl. petitions, L. 363 a.

Peyne, s. pain of torture, A 1133; T. i. 674; in the p., under torture, T. iii. 1502; pain, grief, distress, torment, 3. 587; 4. 96; 11. 23, B 2134, F 737, 1318, I 86; trouble, care, F 509; toil, G 1398; penalty, B 4. p 1. 38; B 3041, D 1314, H 86; endeavour, R. 765; penance, B 2939, I 109; Peynes, gen. F 480; upon p., under a penalty, E 586; Peynes, pl. penalties, I 837; pains, 23. 2, 11; I 132. See Payne.

Peyne, v. refl. take pains, endeavour, B 4495; put (myself) to trouble, HF. 246; Peyne, 1 pr. s. refl. take pains, C 330, 395; Peynest thee, HF. 627; Peyneth, pr. s. refl. takes pains, endeavours, 5. 339; T. v. 1524; B 320; Peynen, pr. pl. refl. endeavour, L. 636; Peyned hir, pt. s. refl. took pains, A 139, E 976; Peyned hem, pt. pl. refl. R. 107; Peyne thee, imp. s. take pains, endeavour, 13. 8 n.

Peynte, v. paint, 3. 783; T. ii. 1041; C 12, I 1022; colour highly, HF. 246; smear, L. 875; ger. C 17; do p., cause to be painted, 3. 259; Peynte, pr. pl. paint, F 725; pr. s. subj. C 15; Peyntedè, pt. s. D 692; Peynted, pt. s. F 560; Peynted, pp. painted, L. 1029, 2536; 5. 284; A 1934, F 907; highly coloured, T. ii. 424; Peynt, pp. R. 248, 1436.

Peynting, s. painting, R. 210.

Peyntour, s. painter, T. ii. 1041.

Peynture, s. painting, C 33; Peyntures, pl. R. 142.

Peyre, s. pair, A 2121; a set (of similar things), A. ii. 40. 18; D 1741; Payre, R. 1386; 3. 1289; Paire, pl. pairs, R. 1698.

Peysible, adj. tranquil, B 3. m 9. 33 (L. tranquilla); Pesible, calm, B 1. p 5. 2.

Peytrel, s. poitrel, breast-piece of a horse's harness; properly, the breast-plate of a horse in armour, G 564; Peytrels, pl. I 433. A.F. peitrel, O.F. poitrel, Lat. pectorale.

Phisicien, s. physician, doctor, 3. 39, 571. (Pron. fízishén.)

Phísik, physic, A 413; Phisýk, A 411, B 4028; T. ii. 1038.

Philosóphical, adj. fond of philosophy, T. v. 1857.

Phílosóphre, s. philosopher, didactic writer, A 297, B 25, F 1561, G 490; B 2. p 7. 89; L. 381; Philosóphres, pl. G 1427.

Philosophye, s. philosophy, L. 1898; A 295, 645.

Phislias (Phislyas, Phillyas), error for Physices, B 1189 n.

Phitonesses, pl. pythonesses, witches, HF. 1261. See note.

[Physices, gen. of physics, or natural philosophy, B 1189. Lat. physices, gen. of physicē, natural philosophy; see note.]

Pich, s. pitch, A 3731, I 854.

Pieces, for Peces, B 1326 n.

Piëtee, s. pity, T. iii. 1033, v. 1598.

Piëtous, adj. piteous, sad, T. iii. 1444; sorrowful, T. v. 451; pitiful, F 20 n. Cf. Ital. pietoso.

Pigges, gen. pig's, D 1841; pl. pigs, A 4278; gen. pl. A 700.

Pigges-nye (lit. pig's eye), a dear little thing, A 3268. See note.

Pighte, pt. s. refl. pitched, fell, A 2689; pt. s. subj. should pierce, should stab, 1. 163 (but this is almost certainly an error for prighte, pt. s. subj. of prikke. There is absolutely no authority for assigning to pighte the sense of 'piercing,' beyond a similar error (in several MSS.) in F 418). See Priken.

Piken, v. pick; Piked, pt. s. picked, stole, L. 2467.

Pikerel, s. a young pike (fish), E 1419. See Prompt. Parv.

Pilche, s. a warm furred outer garment, 20. 4. A.S. pylce; from Lat. pellicea, made of fur.

Pile, ger. to pillage, plunder, I 769; v. rob, despoil, D 1362; Pilen, pr. pl. plunder, pillage, I 767. See Piled, Pilled; cf. E peel, pillage.

Piled, pp. deprived of hair, very thin, A 627; bare, bald (lit. peeled), A 3935.

Pileer (piléér), s. pillar, HF. 1421, 1443, 1465; Píler, HF. 1428, 1430, 1457, 1486, 1491, 1497, 1507; B 3308; Pilér, pillar, column, A 1993, 2466; Pilére, 3. 739; Píler, as adj. serving as a prop, 5. 177; Pilers, pl. 5. 230; B 3274. O.F. piler.

Pilgrim, s. 13. 18; T. v. 1577; A 4349; Pilgrims, pl. A 26; Pílgrimes, A 2848; Pilgrýmes, HF. 2122.

Pilgrimáge, s. pilgrimage, A 21, 78, B 1424; Pilgrimages, pl. A 12, D 557, I 105.

Pilled, pp. robbed, L. 1262. See Pile.

Pilours, pl. robbers, spoilers, pillagers, A 1007, 1020, I 769. See Pile.

Pilwe, s. pillow, E 2004; Pilowe, T. v. 224; Pilow, 3. 254; Pilwes, pl. T. iii. 444.

Pilwe-beer, s. pillow-case, A 694. See Bere, and see note.

Piment, s. sweetened wine (see note), B 2. m 5. 6; A 3378.

Pin, s. pin, small peg, F 127, 316; fastening, brooch, A 196; thin wire, A. ii. 38. 5; Pinnes, pl. pins, or brooches, A 234; Hangeth on a ioly pin, is in a merry place, is merry, E 1516. See Pyn.

Pinacles, pl. pinnacles, HF. 124, 1189.

Pinche, v. find fault (with), pick a hole (in), A 326; Pinchen, ger. to find fault, H 74; Pinchest at, 2 pr. s. blamest, 10. 57; Pinched, pp. closely pleated, A 151.

Piper, s. as adj. suitable for pipes or horns, 5. 178.

Pirry, for Pyrie, E 2217 n.

Pisse, s. piss, D 729, G 807.

Pisse, ger. to make water, A 3798, 4215; Pissed, pp. D 534.

Pissemyre, s. pismire, ant, D 1825.

Pistel, s. epistle, E 1154; hence message, sentence, D 1021.

Pit, s. pit, L. 678, 697; Pittes, gen. of the grave, E 1401. See Put.

Pit, pp. put (Northern), A 4088.

Pitaunce, s. pittance, A 224. Properly, an additional allowance served out to the inmates of religious houses at festivals; hence an allowance.

Pitee, s. pity, I. 68; B 292, 660, 2811, 3231, F 479; Pité, 2. 1; 5. 10, 22; Pite were, it would be a pity (if), 3. 1266.

Pith, s. strength, R. 401; D 475.

Pitóus, Pítous, adj. compassionate, A 143, F 20; merciful, B 4. p 4. 189; T. i. 113; C 226; pitiful, 1. 88; A 953; plaintive, R. 89, 497; mournful, R. 420; piteous, sad, sorrowful, 3. 84, 470; 7. 9; A 955, B 449, 2140, 3567, C 166, E 1121, I 1039; pitiable, B 3673; Pitousë, fem. full of compassion, L. 2582 (cf. Dispitousë, fem. 3. 264). See Pietous.

Pitously, adv. piteously, 3. 711; B 1059, C 298, F 863; pitiably, B 3729, D 202, F 414, 461; sadly, A 1117; full of pity, 2. 18.

Place, s. place, 3. 806; A 623, 800; manor-house (residence of a chief person in a small town or village), B 1910, D 1768. See note to B 1910.

Placebo, vespers of the dead, so called from the initial word of the antiphon to the first psalm of the office (see Ps. cxiv. 9 in the Vulgate version), I 617; a song of flattery, D 2075.

Plages, s. pl. regions, B 543; quarters of the compass, A. i. 5. 8, ii. 31. 11. Lat. plaga.

Plain, adj.; see Playn.

Plain, adv. plainly, clearly, B 990; Plein, B 886. See Playn.

Plane, s. plane-tree, A 2922; Planes, pl. R. 1384.

Plane, v.; Planed, pt. s. planed, made smooth, D 1758.

Planete (planéte, plánet), s. planet, 3. 693, 823; T. iii. 1257; A. ii. 4. 9; Planetes, pl. A. pr. 77. The seven planets are the Moon, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn.

Plantain, s. G 581.

Plante, s. slip, cutting, D 763; piece of cut wood, R. 929. See Plaunte.

Plastres, s. pl. plaisters, or plasters, F 636.

Plat, adj. flat, certain, A 1845; Platte, dat. flat (side of a sword), F 162, 164. F. plat.

Plat, adv. flat, B 1865; flatly, straight out, bluntly, T. i. 681; B 886, 3947, C 648; fully, T. ii. 579. See Platly.

Plate, s. plate-armour, 9. 49; stiff iron defence for a hauberk, B 2055; the 'sight' on the 'rewle,' A. i. 13. 2; Plates, pl. iron plates for defensive armour, A 2121.

Plated, pp. plated, covered with metal in plates, HF. 1345.

Platly, adv. flatly, plainly, T. iii. 786, 881, iv. 924; I 485. See Plat.

Plaunte, s. plant, T. iv. 767; F 1032; Plante, slip, cutting, D 763; piece of cut wood, R. 929.

Plaunte, imp. s. plant, T. i. 964; Plaunted, pp. B 1. p 4. 182.

Play, s. play, amusement, 3. 50; Playes, pl. contrivances (see note), 3. 570. See Pley.

Playen me, v. refl. to play, amuse myself, R. 113. See Pleye.

Playing, s. sport, R. 112.

Playn, adj. smooth, even, R. 860; in short and pl., in brief, plain terms, E 577; Plain, flat, even with the ground, H 229.

Playn, s. plain, B 24, F 1198; Playne (for Playn, before a vowel), E 59; Playnes, pl. plains, R. 1506.

Plede, ger. to dispute, B 2559. See Plete.

Pleding, s. pleading, 3. 615; 5. 495; Pledinge, I 166. See Pleting.

Pledoures, pl. pleaders, lawyers, R. 198.

Plee, s. plea, pleading, 5. 485; Plees, pl. suits, 5. 101.

Plegges, s. pl. pledges, B 3018.

Plein; see Pleyn.

Pleinedest, 2 pt. s. didst complain, B 4. p 4. 112. See Pleyne.

Pleinnesse, s. flatness, plain surface, B 5. m 4. 12.

Pleinte, s. complaint, lament, B 66; Pleintes, pl. B 1068.

Plenére, adj. plenary, full, L. 1607. O.F. plenier, plener: Godefroy.

Plentee, s. (plentéé, pléntē), plenitude, fulness, B 5. p 6. 29; I 1080; abundance, R. 1434; E 264, F 300; gret pl., in great abundance, B 3665; Plente, R 1429.

Plentevous, adj. plentiful, A 344; plenteous, B 1. p 1. 40; B 2. p 1. 78; Plentevouse (for Plentevous, before a vowel), B 1. m 2. 17; Plentivous, adj. fruitful, B 3. m 1. 1. 'Plentivos, plentevous, habondant, fertile, riche': Godefroy.

Plentevously, adv. plenteously, B 2. p 2. 56; Plentivousely, fully, B 1. p 5. 38.

Plesaunce, s. pleasure, 12. 22; 18. 1; L. 1446, 1769, 1770; C 219, D 408, F 1199, I 546; good pleasure, B 5. p 6. 34; delight, 3. 767; 4. 46; 5. 676; T. iii. 4; A 2409; (personified), 5. 218; 6. 30; pleasant thing, 3. 773; 4. 238; pleasure, will, A 1571, E 501, 658, 663, 672, 959, 964; kindness, E 1111; pleasing behaviour, F 509; pleasantness, L. 1373; happiness, L. 1150; amusement, F 713; Plesance, pleasure, delight, 3. 704; D 1232; will, delight, B 149, 276, 762, 1140. O.F. plaisance.

Plesaunt, adj. pleasant, satisfactory, pleasing, A 138, 222, 254, B. 2909; agreeable, R. 1264.

Plesen, v. please, A 610, F 707; Plese, v. 5. 478; F. 1186.

Plesinges, adj. pl. pleasing, B 711.

Plesure, s. pleasure, 6. 126.

Pleten, v. plead, argue, reason, B 2. p 2. 1; Plète, ger. to plead, bring a law-suit, T. ii. 1468. See Plede.

Pleting, s. pleading, argument, 5. 495 n; Pletinges, pl. law-suits, B 3. p 3. 49. See above, and see Pleding.

Pley, s. play, sport, 5. 193; A 1125, 4357, E 10, 11, 1030, I 644; dalliance, 4. 178; jesting, I 539; delusion, 3. 648; Play, amusement, 3. 50; Pleyes, pl. games, T. v. 304; plays, D 558; funeral games, T. v. 1499; Playes, contrivances, 3. 570.

Pleye, v. amuse oneself, B 3524, 3666; hence use, apply, A. ii. 40. 54; Pleye, ger. to play, be playful, be amused, A 772; to amuse (myself), HF. 2132; B 3996; to amuse (ourselves), L. 1495; to amuse (herself), take a holiday, L. 2300; to amuse (himself), B 2158; Pleyen, v. to play, A 758; play (on an instrument), A 236; ger. to amuse (themselves), F 897; Pleye, 1 pr. s. jest, B 3153; 1 pr. pl. play, B 1423; Pleyen, pr. pl. F 900; Pleye, pr. pl. amuse (themselves), F 905; Pleyde, pt. s. played, rejoiced, T. i. 1013; was in play, 3. 875; Pleyd, pp. 3. 618; Pleying, pres. part. amusing (myself), R. 1329; amusing (herself), F 410. See Playen.

Pleying, s. amusement, sport, R. 133, 341, 598; 3. 605; Pleyinge, A 1061.

Pleyinge, adj. cheery, playful, B 3. m 2. 17.

Pleyn (1), adj. full, 1. 13; 5. 126; A 2461, G 346; full, complete, A 315, 337. F. plein, Lat. plēnus.

Pleyn (2), adj. plain, clear, L. 328; B 324, F 720; plain, honest, 5. 528; 7. 87, 116, 278; plain, i.e. open, A 987; as s. plain (fact), A 1091; Pleyne, pl. smooth, 5. 180. F. plain, L. plānus.

Pleyn (1), adv. full, T. v. 1818; fully, entirely, A. 327.

Pleyn (2), adv. plainly, R. 295; A 790, B 3947, E 19, G 360; openly, E 637; Plein, clearly, B 886.

Pleyne, v. complain, lament, 2. 108; 4. 156; 11. 15; B 1067, C 512, D 387, I 84; L. 93, 1236; refl. 6. 50; D 336; v. to whinny (as a horse), 7. 157; ger. 4. 286; 5. 179; R. 1472; pl. upon, cry out against, L. 2525; Pleyne, 1 pr. s. make complaint, L. 2512; C 167; Pleyneth, pr. s. laments, F 819; complains, 4. 158; A 4114; Pleyne, 1 pr. pl. subj. E 97; Pleynen, pr. pl. complain, A 1251; Pleyned, pp. said by way of complaint, L. 326 a; Pleyne, imp. s. complain, B 2. p 1. 45, p 8. 31; imp. pl. L. 222 a. F. plaindre.

Pleyning, s. complaining, lamenting, 3. 599; Pleyninge, I 84; Pleyninges, pl. laments, B 2. p 2. 4.

Pleynly, adv. plainly, openly (or, fully), A 1733; plainly, L. 64; A 727.

Pleynte, s. plaint, complaint, 2. 47; Pleynt (for Pleynte, before hath), F 1029; Pl. of Kynde, Complaint of Nature, 5. 316. O.F. plainte.

Plighte (1), pt. s. plucked, drew, T. ii. 1120; pulled, B 15; Plight, pp. plucked, torn, D 790. The infin. would be plicchen, variant of plukkien (A.S. pluccian) or plukken; cf. shrighte, prighte, twighte (all in Chaucer).

Plighte (2), 1 pr. s. plight, pledge, F 1537; Plighte, pt. s. L. 2466; D 1051; Plighten, pt. pl. L. 778; Plight, pp. plighted, pledged, 7. 227; T. iv. 1610; C 702; Plighte, imp. s. D 1009. A.S. plihtan.

Plomet, s. plummet, heavy weight, A. ii. 23. 26.

Plom-rewle, s. plummet-rule, A. ii. 38. 6.

Plough, s. 9. 9; A 887; Plogh, B 1478.

Plough-harneys, s. harness for a plough, i.e. parts of a plough, as the share and coulter, A 3762.

Ploumes, s. pl. plums, R. 1375.

Ploungen, ger. to plunge, bathe, B 2. p 2. 29; Plounged, pp. B 1. p 1. 55.

Ploungy, adj. stormy, rainy, B 1. m 3. 6; B 3. m 1. 6.

Plowman, s. ploughman, A 529, E 799.

Plukke, v. pluck, pull, T. iv. 1403.

Plumage, s. plumage, F 426.

Plye, v. ply, mould, E 1430; bend, E 1169; pr. pl. T. i. 732.

Plyght, pp. plighted, T. iii. 782. See Plighte (2).

Plyt, s. plight, T. ii. 712, 1731, 1738; iii. 246, 1039, 1139; condition, B 2338, I 762; position, T. ii. 74; Plyte, dat. mishap, wretched condition, 5. 294; 7. 297; plight, 23. 19; state, G 952; Plyt, dat. condition, E 2335. The mod. E. plight is misspelt; cf. O.F. ploit.

Plyte, ger. to fold, T. ii. 1204; Plyted, pt. s. folded, turned backwards and forwards, T. ii. 697.

Pocok, s. peacock, A 104 (Harl. MS.). See Pecok. A.S. .

Poeple, s. populace, ignorant folk, B 4. m 5. 23. See Peple.

Poeplish, popular, T. iv. 1677.

Poesye, s. poetry, T. v. 1790.

Poetical, HF. 1094.

Poetrye, s. poetry, T. v. 1855; HF. 858; E 33; Poetryes, pl. poems, HF. 1478; F 206.

Poets, pl. 3. 54.

Poinant, adj. poignant, I 130, 131, 132.

Point, Poynt, s. point, A 114, 790; L. 1630; position, I 921; Pointe, dat. place, 3. 660; in point, on the point of, about to, 3. 13; HF. 2018; B 331, 910; at point, ready, T. iv. 1638; in good p., in good case, B 2. p 4. 19; A 200; fro p. to p., from beginning to end, B 3652; p. for p., in every detail, E 577. See Poynt.

Point-devys, at p., with great neatness, exactly, carefully, HF. 917; A 3689, F 560.

Pointel, s. style, i.e. stylus, writing implement, B 1. p 1. 2; B 5. m 4. 11; Poyntel, D 1742.

Poison, s. L. 2180; B 3857; Poysoun, 9. 64.

Poke, s. bag, A 3780, 4278.

Poked, pt. s. incited, T. iii. 116; poked, nudged, A 4169.

Pokets, s. pl. pockets, i.e. little bags, G 808.

Pokkes, s. pl. pocks, pustules, C 358. A.S. poc; Du. pok, a pock, pustule. Small pox is a corrupt form of 'the small pocks.'

Pol (1), s. pole, long stick; Pole, dat. L. 2202.

Pol (2), s. pole (of the heavens), A. i. 14. 6; Pool, A. i. 18. 13; B 4. m 5. 3.

Polax, s. pole-axe, L. 642; Pollax, A 2544.

Polcat, s. polecat, C 855.

Policye, s. public business, C 600.

Polished, pp. E 1582; Polisshed, D 1742.

Pollax, s. pole-axe, A 2544; Polax, L. 642.

Pollucioun, s. pollution, I 912.

Polut, pp. polluted, B 1. p 4. 180.

Polýve, s. pulley, F 184. Cf. F. poulie.

Pomel, s. round part, top, A 2689.

Pomely, adj. marked with round spots like an apple, dappled, A 616; Pomely-gris, dapple-gray, G 559. Cotgrave has 'Gris pommelé, a dapple gray.' Also 'Pommelé, daple, or dapled; also round, or plump, as an apple.' Also 'Pommeler, to grow round or plump like an apple; also, to daple.'

Pomgarnettes, s. pl. pomegranates, R. 1356.

Pompe, s. pomp, A 525; T. iv. 1670.

Pompous, adj. stately, magnificent, B 3745.

Pool, s. pole (of the heavens), B 4. m 5. 3; A. i. 18. 13; Pol, A. 1. 14. 6.

Pope, s. pope, A 261, E 741, I 773; 3. 929; Popes, gen. E 746; pl. B 2039.

Pope-Holy, i.e. Hypocrisy, R. 415.

Popelote, s. poppet, darling, A 3254. Cf. O.F. poupelet, 'petit poupon': Godefroy.

Popet, s. poppet, puppet, doll; spoken ironically, and therefore really applied to a corpulent person, B 1891.

Popiniay, s. popinjay, R. 913; 5. 359; B 1559 n. See Papeiay.

Poplér, s. poplar-tree, A 2921; (collectively) poplar-trees, R. 1385.

Poplexye, s. apoplexy, B 4031 n.

Popped, pt. s. refl. tricked herself out, R. 1019. 'Poupiner, popiner, s'attifer, se parer': Godefroy.

Popper, s. small dagger, A 3931 (see note).

Poraille, s. poor people, A 247. O.F. povraille: Godefroy.

Porche, s. Porch, B 5. m 4. 1.

Pore, adj. poor, L. 388, 390, 1981; D 109, 1063. For Povre, q. v.

Porphúrie, s. porphyry; i.e. a slab of porphyry used as a mortar, G 775.

Porisme, s. corollary, B 3. p 10. 113; Porismes, pl. B 3. p 10. 100.

Port (1), s. port, carriage, behaviour, A 69, 138; bearing, mien, R. 1307; 3. 384; T. i. 1084; L. 2453. Porte, dat. 5. 262.

Port (2), s. haven, T. i. 526, 969.

Portatif, adj. portable, 3. 53; A. pr. 52.

Porter, s. A 1940; HF. 1954; L. 1717; Portours, pl. porters, T. v. 1139.

Porthors, s. portesse, breviary, B 1321. See note.

Portreitour, s. draughtsman, A 1899 n.

Portreiture, s. drawing, picture, R. 827; set of drawings, A 1968; Portraiture, 3. 626; Portreyture, picturing, HF. 131; Portreitures, pl. drawings, A 1915; Portraitures, paintings, R. 141; Portreytures, pictures, HF. 125.

Portreye, v. pourtray, depict, 1. 81; draw, sketch, 3. 783; Portrayed, pp. painted in fresco, R. 140; full of pictures, R. 1077; Portrayinge, pres. pt. pourtraying, T. v. 716. See Purtreye.

Portreying, s. a picture, A 1938.

Pose, s. a cold in the head, A 4152, H 62. A.S. ge-pose, a stuffing or cold in the head.

Pose, 1 pr. s. put the case, (will) suppose, B 4. p 6. 132; B 5. p 4. 31; T. iii. 310, 571; A 1162.

Positif, adj. positive, fixed, A 1167.

Positioun, s. supposition, hypothesis, B 5. p 4. 30.

Posse, v.; Posseth, pr. s. pusheth, tosseth, L. 2420; Possed, pp. T. i. 415. F. pousser; Lat. pulsare.

Possessioners, s. pl. men who are endowed, D 1722.

Possessioun, s. possession, D 1200; large property, great possessions, wealth, F 686; endowments, D 1926.

Possíble, adj. possible, 3. 988; as p. is me, it is as possible for me, 5. 471.

Possibilitee, s. possibility, A 1291, F 1343; T. ii. 607, iii. 448; L. 288.

Post, s. post, prop, support, A 214; T. i. 1000; post, pillar, A 800.

Postum, s. imposthume, abscess, B 3. P 4. 9.

Pot, s. I 951; Pottes, pl. pots, L. 649; D 289.

Potáge, s. broth, B 3623, C 368.

Potente, s. crutch, R. 368; T. v. 1222; staff, D 1776. Cf. cross potent, in heraldry.

Potestat, s. potentate, D 2017. See note.

Pot-ful, s. pot-ful, HF. 1686.

Pothecárie, s. apothecary, C 852. See Apotecarie.

Pouche, s. pouch, pocket, HF. 1349; A 3931; Pouches, pl. pouches, money-bags, A 368.

Poudre, s. dust, T. v. 309; HF. 536; powder, G 760; gunpowder, HF. 1644; Poudres, pl. G 807.

Poudred, pp. powdered, besprinkled, R. 1436.

Poudre-marchaunt, s. the name of a kind of spice, A 381. See note.

Pounage, s. pannage, swine's food, 9. 7. Cf. F. panage, 'pawnage, mastage for swyne': Cotgrave.

Pound, pl. pounds, A 454, F 683, 1560, 1573, G 1364; R. 501. A.S. pund, pl. pund; cf. 'five-pound note.'

Poune, s. pawn at chess, 3. 661. O.F. peon, paon; late Lat. pedonem, foot-soldier. See peon, in Godefroy.

Pounsoned, pp. as adj. stamped, pierced, I 421. 'Poisonner, to prick or pierce with a bodkin; to stamp, or mark with a puncheon': Cotgrave.

Pounsoninge, s. punching of holes in garments, I 418. See above.

Pouped, pt. pl. blew hard, puffed, B 4589; pp. blown, H 90. An imitative word; cf. pop.

Poure, ger. to pore, look closely, A 185, D 1738; to pore over (it), R. 1640; Poure, v. to pore, T. ii. 1708; E 2112; Pouren, ger. HF. 1121; Pouren, 1 pr. pl. (we) pore, gaze steadily, G 670; Poure, 2 pr. s. subj. pore, D 295; Poured, pp. T. i. 299.

Poured, pp. poured, R. 1148.

Pouring, s. pouring (in), T. iii. 1460.

Pous, s. pulse, T. iii. 1114. O.F. pouls, pous: Godefroy.

Poustee, s. power, B 4. p 5. 9. O.F. poeste, from Lat. acc. potestatem.

Povertee, s. poverty, 3. 410; Povérte, s. poverty, T. iv. 1520; B 99, D 1185, E 816; Povért, poverty, R. 450; L. 2065; D 1167, 1177, 1179, 1183, 1873; Povért, C 441, D 1191, 1195, 1199, 1201; HF. 88.

Povre, adj. poor, R. 466, A 225, 478, 1409, B 116, 120, 2607, 4011, C 179, D 1187, 1193, 1608, I 199. O.F. povre.

Povre, adj. as s. poor, hence poverty, 10. 2. See note.

Povre, adv. poorly, E 1043. See above.

Povreliche, adj. poorly, in poverty, E 213, 1055.

Povrely, adv. poorly, R. 219; in poor array, A 1412.

Povrest, adj. superl. poorest, C 449, E 205.

Power, s. power, authority, A 218; might, 3. 544.

Poynaunt, adj. pungent, A 352, B 4024.

Poynt, s. sharp point, 7. 211; very object, aim, A 1501; point, bit (of it), part, R. 1236; a stop, G 1480; up p., on the point, T. iv. 1153; in p. is, is on the point, is ready, 1. 48; fro p. to p., in every point, 5. 461; to the p., to the point, 5. 372; at p. devys, exact at all points, R. 830; to perfection, exquisitely, R. 1215; Poyntes, pl. laces furnished with tags at the ends, tags, A 3322. See Point.

Poynte, ger. to describe, T. iii. 497; Poynten, pr. pl. stab, R. 1058; Poynted, pp. pointed, R. 944; T. ii. 1034.

Poyntel, s. style for writing, D 1742. See Pointel.

Poysoun, s. poison, 9. 64. See Poison.

Practik, s. practice, B 1. p 1. 21 n; practical working, A. pr. 51; Praktike, practice, D 187.

Practisour, s. practitioner, A 422.

Praunce, ger. to prance about, run about, T. iii. 690 n; Praunce, 1 pr. s. T. i. 221.

Praye, s. prey, 1. 64. See Preye.

Praye, pr. pl. petition, make suit, I 785; imp. s. pray, 1. 62. See Preye.

Prayere, (preyéérə), s. prayer, A 1205; L. 2268; Prayéres, pl. D 865. See Preyere.

Praying, s. request, prayer, R. 1484.

Preamble, s. D 831.

Preambulacioun, s. preambling, D 837.

Precedent, adj. preceding, A. ii. 32. 3.

Precept, s. commandment, D 65.

Preche, v. preach, T. ii. 59; A 481, 712, B 1179; Preche, ger. to preach (to), counsel, T. ii. 569; Prechen, v. B 1177; Prechestow, thou preachest, D 366; Prechen, pr. pl. preach (to), F 284; Precheth, imp. pl. E 12.

Prechour, s. preacher, D 165.

Precious, adj. estimable, R. 419; precious, 1. 59; prudish, E 1962; scrupulous, very dainty, D 148.

Preciousnesse, s. costliness, I 446.

Predestinacioun, s. predestination, B 4. p 6. 19.

Predestinat, pp. foreordained, B 5. p 2. 33.

Predestinee, s. predestination, T. iv. 966.

Predicacioun, s. preaching, sermon, B 1179, C 345, 407, D 2109.

Preef, s. proof, assertion, D 247; experience, L. 528 a; test, proof, G 968, 1379; the test, H 75. See Proef, Preve.

Prees (prèès), s. press, crowd, 13. 1; 16. 40; T. ii. 1649; HF. 1359; B 393, 646, 677, 3327, F 189; the throng of courtiers, 13. 4; Pres, T. ii. 1643; press of battle, 9. 33; Presse, dat. throng, company, 10. 52; in p., in the crowd, 5. 603. See Presse.

Preesseth, pr. s. throngs, A 2580 (cf. 2530). See Prese, Pressen.

Preest, s. priest, A 501, B 4000; Prest, B 1166; Preestes, pl. A 164, I 105.

Preesthode, s. priesthood, I 900.

Prefectes, gen. prefect's, G 369. Lit. 'an officer of the prefect's (officers).'

Preferre, pr. s. subj. precede, take precedence of, D 96.

Preignant, pres. pt. plain, convincing, T. iv. 1179. 'Pregnant, pregnant, pithy, forcible; Raisons pregnantes, plain, apparent, important or pressing reasons': Cotgrave.

Preisen, ger. to praise, (worthy) of being praised, R. 70; to appraise, judge of, B 1. p 4. 120; Preyse, v. appraise, estimate, R. 1115; ger. to praise, L. 67; to be praised, B 2706; Preysen, v. appraise, B 3. p 11. 3; B 4. p 3. 49; Preyse, 1 pr. s. praise, 5. 586; prize, esteem, R. 1693; Preise, 1 pr. s. praise, F 674; Preised, pp. praised, R. 1252; Preysed, pp. L. 536.

Preiseres, s. pl. praisers, B 2367.

Preisinge, s. honour, glory, I 949; Preysing, praise, L. 189, 248, 416.

Prelát, s. prelate, A 204.

Premisses, pl. statements laid down, B 3. p 10. 83; B 4. p 4. 48.

Prenostik, s. prognostic, prognostication, 10. 54.

Prente, s. print, D 604.

Prenten, ger. to imprint, T. ii. 900.

Préntis, s. apprentice, A 4365, 4391; B 1490; Prentýs, A 4385.

Prentishood, s. apprenticeship, A 4400.

Prescience, s. foreknowledge, B 5. p 3. 17; A 1313, E 659; foreknowing, T. iv. 987, 998.

Prese, ger. to press forward, T. i. 446; v. hasten, 2. 19. See Pressen.

Presénce, s. 1. 19; T. ii. 460; in pr., in company, in a large assembly, E 1207.

Present, adj. being present, present, R. 377; B 1. p 4. 171; E 470; Presént, E 80.

Présent, s. gift, L. 1935; Presént, gift, R. 1192; present time, B 5. p 6. 77; in present, at that time, then, R. 1191.

Present, adv. immediately, 5. 424.

Presentarie, adj. ever-present, B 5. p 6. 49, 73, 202.

Presente, ger. to present, L. 1095, 1132; Presented, pp. brought, L. 1297.

Presenting, s. offering, L. 1135.

Presently, adv. at the present moment, B 5. p 6. 78.

President, s. the one who presided in parliament, T. iv. 213.

Presóun, s. prison, T. iii. 380; Préson, T. v. 884. See Prison.

Press, s. throng, T. i. 173; Presse, dat. instrument exercising pressure, A 81; mould, A 263; on presse, under a press, in a suppressed state, down, T. i. 559; Presse (for Press, before a vowel?), press, i.e. a kind of cupboard with shelves (for linen, &c.), A 3212.

Pressen, v. press forward, B 4. m 1. 17; Preesseth, pr. s. throngs, A 2580; Presse, imp. s. constrain, 25. 23 (see vol. iv. p. xxviii). See Prese.

Prest, s. priest, B 1166; Preest, A 501, B 4000; Preestes, pl. A 164, I 105.

Prest, adj. ready, prepared, prompt, 5. 307; T. ii. 785, iii. 485, 917, v. 800; Preste, pl. prompt, T. iv. 661. O.F. prest.

Presume, v. E 1503; Presumed, pt. pl. C 18.

Presumpcioun, s. presumption, HF. 94; T. i. 213; B 2505, 3745; Presumpcion, I 391; Presumpcions, pl. presumptions, suppositions, B 2598.

Pretende, v. attempt to reach, seek (after), T. iv. 922.

Preterit, s. past time, B 5. p 6. 30; Preterits, pl. past times, B 5. p 6. 13.

Pretorie, s. the Roman imperial body-guard, the Pretorian cohort, B 1. p 4. 61.

Preve, s. proof, 5. 497; T. i. 690; HF. 878, 989; B 4173; L. 28, 1113; dat. T. iii. 307; experimental proof, A. ii. 23, rub.; D 2272, E 787; at p., at the proof, (when it comes) to the proof, T. iii. 1002; at p., in the proof, T. iv. 1659; armes preve, the proof of arms, proof of fighting power, T. i. 470. See Preef, Proef.

Preve, v. prove, 3. 552; HF. 707; L. 9, 100; C 169; bide the test, G 645; succeed when tested, G 1212; 1 pr. s. prove, HF. 787, 826; pr. s. subj. may test, may try, E 1152; Preveth, pr. s. E 1000, 2238; tries, tests, E 1155; shews, E 2425; Preved, pp. HF. 814; A 3001, B 2263, C 193; proved to be so, T. i. 239; tested, G 1336; approved, E 28; exemplified, E 826; shewn, F 481. See Proeve, Prove.

Prevetee, s. secret place, recess, T. iv. 1111. See Privetee.

Prevey, adj. secret, B 4. p 3. 77. See Privee.

Previdence, s. seeing beforehand, B 5. p 6. 83.

Prevy, adj. privy, secret, unobserved, 3. 382; close, not confidential, HF. 285. See Privee.

Preye, s. prey, T. i. 201; D 1455; Praye, 1. 64; Preyes, pl. D 1472. A.F. preie.

Preye, ger. to beseech, T. ii. 1369; A 1483; to pray, 2. 20; Preyen, ger. 2. 11; Preye, v. A 301, I 179; Preye, 1 pr. s. 1. 83; A 725, D 1261; Preyen, 1 pr. pl. A 1260; Preyde, pt. s. L. 2294; B 391, 3729, E 548, 765, I 178; Preyede, F 311; Preyden, 1 pt. pl. A 811; Preyeden, pt. pl. D 895; Preyed, pp. E 773; Preyeth, imp. pl. 10. 78; T. i. 29. See Praye.

Preyere, s. prayer, A 3587, B 1669; Préyere, L. 1141; E 141; H 6; Preyéres, pl. prayers, A 231. See Prayere.

Preyneth, for Proyneth, E 2011 n.

Preys, s. praise, B 3837.

Preyse; see Preise.

Preysing; see Preisinge.

Pricasour, s. a hard rider, A 189. See Priken.

Prighte, pt. s. pricked, F 418 (inferior MSS. have pighte). No doubt, the reading pighte in 1. 163 should also be prighte. See below.

Priken, v. incite, urge, T. iv. 633; Prik, 1 pr. s. spur, rouse, 5. 389; Priketh, pr. s. incites, excites, T. i. 219; L. 1192; A 11, 1043; spurs, D 656; spurs, rides, B 1944; pricks, pains, aches, D 1594; Prikke, pr. pl. prick, pierce, R. 1058; Prighte, pt. s. F 418 (see above); Priked, pt. s. spurred, B 1964; Prike, 2 pr. s. subj. B 2001; Prikke, 2 pr. pl. subj. goad, torment, E 1038; Priked, pp. spurred, G 561; Prik, imp. s. spur, L. 1213; Prikinge, pres. pt. pl. spurring, A 2508.

Priking, s. hard riding, A 191; quick riding, A 2599; Prikinge, B 1965.

Prikke, s. point, HF. 907; B 1029; pin's point, B 2. p 7. 18; central point, B 3. p 11. 162; sting, I 468; a small mark, such as a little stick stuck in the ground, A. ii. 42. 3; a dot, A. ii. 5. 12; stab, piercing stroke, A 2606; point, critical condition, B 119.

Prill, pr. pl., error for Prikke, prick, R. 1058 n.

Prince, s. lord, A 2994, 3036; prince, C 599; Princes, pl. 10. 73.

Princesse, s. princess, 1. 97; A 1830; Princess, 18. 73.

Principal, adj. 3. 495; chief, I 515; Principals, pl. chief, A. i. 5. 8; Principalx, pl. cardinal, A. ii. 31. 11.

Principio, in, in the beginning (S. John, i. 1), A 254.

Principles, s. pl. principles, deep feelings, natural disposition, F 487.

Prioresse, s. prioress, A 118, B 1637.

Pris, s. prize, A 2241. See Prys.

Prison, 5. 139; 11. 28; 17. 14. See Presoun.

Prisoner, s. A 1063, 1070; Prisoneres, pl. T. iv. 59.

Privee, adj. secret, A 3295, B 204, 1991, 2911, C 675, I 106; private, I 102; intimate, R. 600; privy, closely attendant, E 192; Prive, friendly, intimate, R. 1066; Privy, secret, L. 1267, 1780, G 1452; privee man, private individual, B 2. p 3. 48. See Prevey, Prevy.

Privee, adv. secretly, F 531; Privee and apert, secretly and openly, D 1114; pr. ne ap., neither secretly nor openly, 1136.

Privee, s. privy, C 527, E 1954.

Prively, adv. secretly, R. 371; A 652, B 21, 3889, E 641, I 106; unperceived, R. 784.

Privetee, s. privacy, R. 1294; secrecy, T. iii. 283; B 548, E 249, G 701, 1052, 1138; secrets, secret, D 531, 542, 1637; privacy, secret counsel, A 3164; secret, private affairs, A 1411; private apartment, A 4334; privy parts, B 3905.

Privy, adj. secret, L. 1267, 1780. See Privee.

Probleme, s. problem, D 2219.

Procede, v. proceed, T. iii. 455; 16. 6; advance, go forward, 16. 30; Proceden, pr. pl. proceed, T. v. 370.

Proces, s. process, B 2665; proceeding, F 1345; process of time, 5. 430; F 829; argument, B 3. p 10. 40; matter, T. ii. 485; L. 1914; story, HF. 251; T. ii. 268, 292; iii. 470; F 658; occurrence of events, B 3511; Procésse, dat. course (of time), 3. 1331.

Processiouns, pl. processions, D 556.

Proche, 1 pr. s. approach, B 4. p 7. 20 n.

Procreacioun, s. procreation, E 1448.

Procuratour, s. proctor, D 1596 n.

Procutour, used for Procurator, proctor, D 1596.

Proef, s. proof, D 2272 n; Profe, Prof, L. 2113 n; Proeve, B 5. p 4. 51; Proeves, pl. B 3. p 12. 135. See Preef.

Proeve, 1 pr. s. approve, B 5. p 3. 19; Proeveth, pr. s. proves, shews, B 2. m 1. 11. See Preve, Prove.

Professioun, s. profession of religion, D 1925, 2135; oath of profession (as a monk), B 1345.

Profit, s. profit, 9. 26; A 249.

Profre, s. offer, L. 2079.

Profre, v.; Proferestow, dost thou offer, T. iii. 1461; Profre, 2 pr. s. subj. mayst offer, G 489; Profreth, pr. s. proffers, A 1415; offers, L. 405; Profre, 2 pr. pl. proffer, F 755; Profred, pp. offered, E 152.

Progenie, s. progeny, I 324.

Progressiouns, pl. progressions, B 4. p 6. 105; processes, developments, A 3013.

Proheme, s. proem, prologue, E 43. F. proëme (Cotgrave).

Prolaciouns, s. pl. utterances, B 2. p 1. 32.

Prolixitee, s. prolixity, tediousness, T. ii. 1564; F 405.

Prolle, 2 pr. pl. prowl about, search widely, G 1412. See Prollyn, and Prollynge, in Prompt. Parv.

Prologe, s. prologue, after A 3186; D 1708; Prológe, prelude, T. iv. 893.

Pronounced, pp. announced, T. iv. 213.

Pronouncere, s. pronouncer, speaker, B 2. p 3. 39.

Prophesye, s. prophecy, T. v. 1521; Prophecyes, pl. T. v. 1494.

Prophet, s. L. 2254; Prophete, I 125.

Propinquitee, s. propinquity, B 2. p 3. 24.

Proporcionables, adj. pl. proportional, B 3. m 9. 13.

Proporcioned, pp. made in proportion, F 192.

Proporcionels, s. pl. proportional parts, F 1278.

Proporcioun, s. proportion, R. 545; T. v. 828; A. i. 16. 3; F 1286; Proporciouns, pl. ratios, A. pr. 3.

Proposicioun, s. proposition, B 2465; Proposiciouns, pl. propositions, B 3. p 10. 99.

Propre, adj. own, T. iv. 83; A. ii. 7. 15; A 581, 3037, B 3518, D 159; own, especial, B 2175; peculiar, L. 259 a; D 103; well-grown, A 3972; well-made, A 3345; comely, A 4368; handsome, C 309; Propres, pl. own, B 1. m 6. 13; in propre, as his own, B 2. p 2. 9; of propre kinde, by their own natural bent, F 610.

Proprely, adv. fitly, A 1459, 3320; properly, literally, I 285; of its own accord, naturally, D 1191; Properly, appropriately, in character, A 729.

Propretee, s. peculiarity, speciality, individuality, B 2. p 6. 70; peculiarity, 10. 69; characteristic, B 2364; quality, B 5. p 6. 48; peculiar possession, T. iv. 392; property, A. i. 21. 41; Propretees, pl. properties, A. i. 10. 5.

Proscripcioun, s. proscription, B 1. p 4. 174.

Prose, s. prose, L. 66, 425; B 96, I 46.

Prose, v. write in prose, 16. 41.

Prospectyves, s. pl. perspective-glasses, lenses, F 234. No doubt Chaucer here makes the usual distinction between reflecting mirrors and refracting lenses. Milton (Vacation Exerc. l. 71) seems to apply the word to a combination of lenses, or telescope.

Prosperitee, s. prosperity, L. 590, 906.

Prospre, adj. prosperous; prospre fortunes, success, well-being, B 1. p 4. 41.

Proteccioun, s. protection, A 2363; Protecciouns, pl. F 56.

Protestacioun, s. protest, T. ii. 484, iv. 1289; A 3137, I 59; L. 2640.

Proud, adj. R. 63; T. i. 210.

Proude-herted, adj. proud-hearted, R. 1491.

Prouder, adj. comp. T. ii. 138.

Proudly, adv. A 1152, G 473.

Prove, v. test, A. ii. 23, rub.; Proveth, pr. s. proves, F 455; Proved, pt. s. proved to be true, A 547. See Preve, Proeve.

Provérbe, s. proverb, T. ii. 397; A 3391, 4405; Próverbe, B 3436; Provérbes, pl. T. i. 756, iii. 299; set of proverbs, 17. 25; Próverbès, proverbial sayings, saws, B 2146.

Provérbed, pp. said in proverbs, T. iii. 293.

Province, s. B 1. p 4. 61.

Provost, s. provost, prefect, B 1. p 4. 43; chief magistrate, B 1806.

Provostrie, s. praetorship, B 3. p 4. 56, 61.

Prow, s. profit, advantage, HF. 579; T. i. 333; ii. 1664; v. 789; B 1598, 4140, C 300, G 609. O.F. preu, prou, profit: Godefroy.

Prowesse, s. prowess, T. i. 438; v. 436; valour, T. ii. 632; bravery, R. 261; excellence, D 1129; profit, B 4. p 3. 45, 67.

Proyneth, pr. s. prunes, i.e. trims, makes (himself) neat, E 2011; Pruneth, E 2011 n. O.F. proigner, provigner: Godefroy.

Pryde, s. Pride, R. 975; pride, G 476, I 388.

Prydelees, adj. without pride, 6. 29; Prydeles, E 930.

Prye, ger. to pry, peer, T. ii. 404; iii. 1571; D 1738, G 668; to gaze, A 3458; v. spy, T. ii. 1710; pry, E 2112.

Pryme, s. prime (of day), usually 9 a.m., T. i. 157; ii. 992, 1095; v. 15, 472; A 2189, 2576, 3554, B 1278, 1396, 4368, 4388, C 662, E 1857, F 73; fully pr., the end of the first period of the day (from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m.), B 2015; pr. large, past 9 o'clock, F 360; passed pr., past 9 o'clock, D 1476; half way pryme, half way between 6 and 9 a.m., half-past seven, A 3906.

Pryme face, s. the first look, first glance, T. iii. 919.

Prymer, s. primer, elementary reading-book, B 1707.

Prymerole, s. primrose, A 3268.

Prys, s. price, value, R. 1134; B 2. p 4. 22; B 5. p 3. 135; A 815, B 2087; worth, excellence, R. 45, 47, 286; F 911; praise, R. 446; B 3. p 6. 22; T. ii. 181, 188; E 1026; esteem, R. 300; T. i. 375; ii. 24; F 934; glory, L. 2534; reputation, D 1152; renown, R. 666, 1198; A 67, 237; prize, reward, B 4. m 7. 43; a prize, B 4. p 4. 137; Pryse, prize, I 355.

Pryse, ger. to esteem, to be esteemed, R. 887.

Pryved, pp. deprived, exiled, 1. 146.

Pryvee, adj. secret, A 2460. See Privee.

Psalmes, pl. psalms, H 345.

Publisshed, pp. proclaimed, T. v. 1095; published, B 2. p 7. 36; Publiced, spread abroad, E 415, 749.

Puffen, ger. to puff, blow hard, HF. 1866.

Puked, for Poked, T. iii. 116 n.

Pulle, s. a bout at wrestling, a throw, 5. 164.

Pulle, v. pluck, T. i. 210; v. 1546; ger. R. 1667; to draw, T. ii. 657; pulle a finche, pluck a finch, cheat a novice, A 652; Pulleth, pr. pl. pull, L. 2308; Pulled, pt. s. pulled, drew, D 2067; a pulled hen, a plucked hen, A 177.

Pulpet, s. pulpit, C 391. Pulpit, D 2282.

Pultrye, s. poultry, A 598.

Punissement, s. punishment, B 3005.

Punisshinge, s. punishment, B 4. p 1. 15; D 1302; Punissinge, B 2622.

Punyce, ger. to punish, T. v. 1707.

Puplisshen, pr. pl. refl. repeople themselves, are propagated, B 3. p 11. 91. Cf. O.F. peuploier, pueplier, puplier, peupler: Godefroy.

Purchacen, ger. to procure, acquire, I 742, 1066; Purchace, v. merit, gain, I 1080; obtain, win, 21. 19; buy, A 608; Purchasen, ger. to acquire, G 1405; Purchacen, pr. pl. promote, B 2870; Purchased, pt. s. contrived, procured, 3. 1112; Purchaced, pp. procured, brought about, 11. 17; Purchace, imp. s. 3 p. may (He) provide, B 873; Purchace, imp. pl. provide (for yourself), T. ii. 1125.

Purchas, s. proceeds of begging, gifts acquired, A 256; gain, D 1451, 1530.

Purchasinge, s. acquiring, B 4. p 7. 50; Purchasing, conveyancing, A 320; acquisition of property, D 1449.

Purchasour, s. conveyancer, A 318.

Pure, adj. very (lit. pure), 3. 490; HF. 280; A 1279; utter, 3. 1209; the p. deth, death itself, 3. 583.

Pure, adv. purely, 3. 1010.

Pured, pp. as adj. pure, F 1560; rendered pure, very fine, D 143.

Purely, adv. merely, only, 3. 5, 843, 934; HF. 39.

Purfiled, pp. ornamented at the edge, trimmed, A 193. 'Porfiler, borner, garder le contour de, parer, orner': Godefroy. 'Porfil, bordure': id.

Purgacioun, s. discharge, D 120.

Purgatórie, s. purgatory, A 1226, D 489, E 1670, I 716.

Purgen, ger. to purge, B 4143; to discharge, D 134; Purgen, pr. pl. B 1763, I 428; Purgede, pt. s. expiated, B 4. m 7. 2 (Lat. piauit); Purged, pp. absolved, cleansed (by baptism), G 181.

Purpos, s. purpose, R. 1140; 1. 113; 2. 5; T. i. 5; B 170, E 573, F 965, I 129, 310; proposal, design, A 1684; to purpos, to the subject, 5. 26; it cam him to p., he purposed, F 606.

Purposen, v. purpose, I 87; Purpósen, pr. pl. propose, T. iv. 1350; propound, B 5. p 6. 207; Purpósed, pp. E 706, 1067; set before, put before, B 4. p 2. 87, p 3. 10; aimed at, B 3. p 2. 52; Purposinge, pr. pt. intending, F 1458.

Purpre, adj. purple, T. iv. 869; L. 654; Purpur, B 1. m 6. 6.

Purpre, s. purple, R. 1071; B 3. m 8. 11; purple raiment, I 933; Purpur, R. 1188; B 2. m 5. 11; Purpres, pl. purple robes, B 3. m 4. 2.

Purs, s. purse, 19. 15; A 656, B 2794, D 1348, E 1883, F 148; Purse, 19. 1; Purses, pl. D 1350, G 1404.

Pursevauntes, s. pl. pursuivants, HF. 1321.

Púrsuit, s. continuance, perseverance, T. ii. 959; Púrsuite, continuance in pursuit, T. ii. 1744; Pursúte, s. appeal to prosecute, D 890. 'Porsuit, effort, recherche': Godefroy.

Purtreye, v. draw, A 96; Purtreyed, pt. s. pourtrayed, E 1600. See Portreye.

Purtreyour, s. draughtsman, A 1899.

Purveyable, adj. with provident care, B 3. m 2. 3.

Purveyaunce, s. providence, T. ii. 527; iv. 961, 977, 982, 1000; A 1252, 1665, 3011, F 865; Purviaunce, providence, B 3. p 11. 130; B 4. p 6. 17; prescience, B 5. p 3. 26; Purveyance, providence, B 483; foresight, D 566, 570; equipment, B 247; Purveyaunce, provision, A 3566, F 904; pre-arrangement, T. iii. 533; Purveaunce, provision, I 685; unto his p., to provide himself with necessaries, L. 1561.

Purveyen, v. provide, B 2532; Purveye, v. D 917, E 191; take precautions, T. ii. 504; Purveyth, pr. s. foresees, T. iv. 1066; Purveyeth, pr. s. foresees, foreordains, 10. 66; Purveyed, pp. foreseen, B 5. p 3. 16; T. iv. 1006, 1008; thought over beforehand, I 1003; p. of, provided with, D 591; Purveye, imp. s. provide, T. ii. 426, 1160.

Purveyinge, s. providence, T. iv. 986.

Put, s. pit, T. iv. 1540; I 170; Putte, dat. B 3. m 12. 46. A.S. pyt. See Pit.

Puterie, s. prostitution, I 886; Putrie, I 886. O.F. puterie, putrie: Godefroy and Cotgrave.

Putours, s. pl. pimps, procurers, I 886. See above.

Putten, v. put, lay, 7. 344; Putte, v. suppose, B 2667; ger. to put, 3. 1332; Putteth, pr. s. 4. 229; imposes, B 5. p 4. 37; Put, pr. s. puts, I 142; Put him, puts himself, L. 652; Putte, pt. s. 4. 268; B 1630, 3742; set, L. 675; 1 pt. s. 3. 769; Puttest, 2 pt. s. didst put, B 3875; Put, pp. E 471; placed, B 4. p 7. 64; settled, established, B 1. p 6. 19 (L. locatus); p. of, checked, B 1. p 4. 42; p. up, put away, 2. 54 (see note).

Putting to, i.e. adding, A. ii. 43 a. 12 (vol. iii. p. 232, l. 2).

Pye, s. magpie, 5. 345; T. iii. 527; A 3950, B 1399, D 456, E 1848, G 565; Pyes, pl. HF. 703, F 650. F. pie.

Pye, s. pie, pasty, A 384.

Pyk, s. pike (fish), 12. 17; T. ii. 1041; E 1419.

Pyke, v. (1) peep, T. iii. 60; ger. (2), to pick at, T. ii. 1274; Pyketh, pr. s. (3) makes (himself) tidy or smooth, E 2011. F. piquer, 'to prick, pierce, or thrust into [hence, peep into], ... to stiffen a coller': Cotgrave.

Pykepurs, s. pick-purse, A 1998.

Pyled, pp. peeled, bare, bald, A 4306. See Piled.

Pyn (pin), the pin which passes through the central hole in the Astrolabe and its plates, A. i. 14. 1. See Pin.

Pyn (piin), s. pine-tree, R. 1379, 1457.

Pyn-tree, s. pine-tree, R. 1464; Pyn-trees, pl. R. 1314; B 2. m 5. 13.

Pyne, s. pain, torment, T. v. 6; D 787, I 171; hurt, 5. 335; toil, HF. 147; place of torment, HF. 1512; suffering, T. ii. 676; A 1324, 2382, B 1080, D 385; woe, torment, B 3420, F 448; the passion, B 2126. A.S. pīn?.

Pyne, ger. to torture, A 1746; Pyneth, pr. s. pines away, 7. 205; grieves, bemoans, I 85; Pyned, pp. examined by torture, B 4249. A.S. pīnian.

Pype, s. pipe, musical instrument, HF. 773, 1219; B 2005; Pypes, pl. pipes, tubes, A 2752; musical instruments, A 2511.

Pypen, v. pipe, whistle, A 1838; play on the bagpipe, A 3927; Pype, make a piping noise, T. v. 1433; pipe, play upon a pipe, A 3876; pipe, play music, HF. 1220; Pyped, pp. faintly uttered, HF. 785; Pyping, pres. pt. piping (hot), hissing, A 3379.

Pypers, pl. pipers, HF. 1234.

Pyrie, s. pear-tree, E 2217, 2325. A.S. pyrige; from Lat. pyrus.

 

Quaad, adj. evil (Flemish), A 4357; Quad, bad, B 1628. Du. kwaad; M. Du. quad. 'Een quade boom brengt voort quade vruchten,' a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit; Matt. vii. 17; in Dutch New Test., A. D. 1700. 'Quaet jaer; Ger. schwarz jahr; Ital. mat anno; Fr. maitvaise année. "Wat quaet jaer! hoe zuldi hu ghelaten?"—Het Spel van de V vroede en van de V dwaesen Maegden. "Ein schwarz jahr, rief der alte ... komme über euch!"—Qu'une mauvaise année vous accable, s'écria le vieux juif (Contes fastastiques d'Hoffmann: Le choix d'une fiancée).'—Delfortrie; Analogies des Langues Flamande, Allemande, et Anglaise; p. 308.

Quaille, s. quail, E 1206; Quayles, gen. pl. 5. 339.

Quake, v. tremble, shiver, R. 462; quake, A 3614, F 860; shake, T. iii. 542; Quake, 1 pr. s. I 159; tremble, 6. 55; Quaketh, pr. s. quakes, L. 2680; trembles, T. iv. 14; Quook, pt. s. quaked, T. v. 36, 926; L. 2317, 2648; A 1576, 1762, B 3394; Quaked, pp. B 3831; Quaketh, imp. pl. quake, fear, T. ii. 302; Quaking, pres. pt. shaking, 3. 1212; E 317, 358; Quakinge, heaving, B 4. m 5. 18. (Lat. frementi, perhaps misread as trementi). A.S. cwacian.

Quaking, s. trembling, fear, 7. 214.

Quakke, s. a state of hoarseness, A 4152. Cf. E. Friesic kwak, applied to the croaking of frogs; Low G. quakken, to croak; to groan like a sick man (Bremen Wörterbuch).

Qualitee, s. quality, T. iii. 31.

Qualm, s. pestilence, A 2014; evil, plague, R. 357; foreboding of death, T. v. 382; Qualme, dat. HF. 1968. A.S. cwealm.

Quantite, s. quantity, vastness, 5. 58; size, A. i. 18. 10, 21. 25.

Quappe, v. heave, toss (lit. shake, palpitate), L. 1767; beat repeatedly, L. 865; palpitate, T. iii. 57. Cf. Norweg. kveppa (pt. t. kvapp), to slip suddenly, to rock (Aasen); and see kwabbe, kwabben in Koolman's E. Friesic Dictionary.

Quarele, s. complaint, 25. 11 (see vol. iv. p. xxvii). See Querele.

Quart, s. quart, A 649, 3497.

Quarter, s. quarter, T. v. 1698; fourth part (of the night), 3. 198; Quarters, pl. quarters of the heavens, A. i. 5. 8.

Quarter-night, the time when a fourth part of the night is gone, 9 P. M., A 3516.

Quayles, gen. pl. quails, 5. 339. See Quaille.

Queinte, adj. curious, B 1426; pl. L. 2013. See Queynt.

Quek! int. quack! 5. 499, 594.

Quelle, v. kill, B 4580, C 854; pr. pl. strike, T. iv. 46; 3 imp. s. may (he) kill, G 705. A.S. cwellan.

Queme, v. please, 14. 20; T. 695; Quemen, pr. pl. subserve, T. ii. 803. A.S. cwēman.

Quenche, v. put a stop to, T. iii. 846; be quenched, I 341; Quenchen, ger. to put an end to, T. iii. 1058; Queynte, pt. s. became extinct, was quenched, A 2334, 2337; Queynt, pp. quenched, extinguished, T. iv. 313, 1430; v. 543; A 2321, 2336.

Quene (kwéénə), s. queen, R. 1266; 1. 1, 24; 11. 9; A 882, B 161, 1671, D 1048, F 1046, G 1089; Queen, 1. 25. A.S. cwēn.

Querele, s. quarrel, I 618; Quereles, pl. complaints, B 3. p 3. 49. O.F. querele, dispute, plainte; Godefroy.

Quern, s. hand-mill, 9. 6; Querne, dat. HF. 1798, B 3264. A.S. cweorn; Icel. kvern.

Questemongeres, s. pl. questmen, jurymen, I 797.

Questio, quid iuris, the question is, how stands the law, A 647.

Questioun, s. dispute, A 2514; problem, D 2223.

Queynt, -e; see Quenche.

Queynt, adj. strange, 3. 1330; curious, dainty, R. 65; adorned, R. 1435; curious, well-devised, HF. 228; neat, R. 98; Queynte, strange, curious, HF. 1925, L. 353; T. i. 411; A 1531, 2333, 3605, D 516, E 2061, F 726, G 752; curious, artful, sly, T. iv. 1629; A 3275; quaint, curious, B 1189, F 239, 369; curiously contrived, HF. 126; F 234; hard to understand, 3. 531; graceful, R. 610. O.F. cointe, queinte: Godefroy. See Queinte.

Queynte, adv. artfully, HF. 245.

Queynte, s. pudendum, A 3276, D 332, 444; D 608 n.

Queynteliche, adv. curiously, cunningly, HF. 1923; Queyntely, daintily, R. 569; strangely, R. 783.

Queyntise, s. finery, I 932; art, I 733; Queyntyse, ornament, R. 840. O.F. cointise, queintise.

Qui cum patre (see note), D 1734, I 1092.

Qui la, who's there? B 1404.

Quiete, s. quiet, repose, 1. 14; F 760; Quiéte, 9. 44; T. iii. 506.

Quik, adj. alive, 3. 121; T. iii. 79; F 1336; lively, A 306; intelligent, ready, I 658; Quike, def. living, B 5. m 4. 33; voc. T. i. 411; pl. alive, T. ii. 52; A 1015.

Quiken, v. quicken, revive, T. i. 443; iv. 631; I 235, 628; ger. to grow, T. i. 295; to make alive, quicken, G 481; revive, T. iii. 484; Quikke, ger. to quicken, take life, burst forth, HF. 2078; Quiked, pt. s. became alive, burst into flame, A 2335; pp. endowed with life, F 1050. A.S. cwician.

Quikkest, adj. superl. liveliest, busiest, F 1502.

Quiknesse, s. liveliness, life, 3. 26.

Quiksilver, s. quicksilver, A 629, G 822.

Quinible, s. shrill treble, A 3332 (see note).

Quirboilly, s. boiled leather, B 2065. F. cuir bouilli; see note.

Quisshin, s. cushion, T. ii. 1229; Quisshen, T. iii. 964. O.F. coissin, cuissin; see Cushion in New E. Dict.

Quistroun, s. scullion, kitchen-drudge, R. 886. O.F. coistron, quistron, 'marmiton': Godefroy.

Quit, -te; see Quyte.

Quitly, adv. freely, wholly, A 1792.

Quod, pt. s. said, 3. 370, 1112; L. 1708; A 1234, B 16, 28, 1166, F 967; Quoth, 3. 90. A.S. cwæð, pt. t. of cweðan.

Quoniam, pudendum, D 608. Cf. Queynte. (MS. Cp. has the reading queynte.)

Quook, pt. s. of Quake.

Quyte, v. requite, reward, repay, recompense, give in return, R. 1542; 5. 112; 10. 75; HF. 670; T. i. 808; L. 494, 1447; A 3127, D 1008, H 293; free, ransom, A 1032; ger. to remove, free, 7. 263; quyte with, to requite with, A 3119; hir cost for to quyte, to pay for her expenses, B 3564; quyte hir whyle, repay her time, i.e. her trouble, B 584; Quyten, v. repay, D 1292; ger. to requite, B 2243; Quyte, 1 pr. s. requite, C 420; Quyteth, pr. s. pays, 5. 9; Quyten, pr. pl. requite, I 154; Quyte, pr. s. subj. repay, L. 2227; Quyte yow, repay you, A 770; Quitte, pt. s. requited, L. 1918; repaid, R. 1526; Quitte, pt. pl. released, T. iv. 205; Quit, pp. rewarded, requited, HF. 1614; L. 523; T. ii. 242; A. 4324; set free, L. 1992; G 66; discharged, quit, F 1578; as adj. free, 5. 663; B 5. p 4. 74; T. iii. 1019; F 1534.

 

Raa, s. roe (Northern), A 4086.

Raby, Rabbi, D 2187.

Race, for Arace, T. iii. 1015 n.

Rad, -de; see Rede.

Radevore, s. piece of tapestry, L. 2352; see note.

Rafles, s. pl. raffles, I 793.

Raft, -e; see Reve.

Rafter, s. A 990.

Rage, s. passion, R. 1613; craving, 1657; madness, 3. 731; L. 599; violent grief, F 836; violent rush, fierce blast, A 1985.

Rage, v. romp, toy wantonly, A 257, 3273, 3958.

Ragerye, s. wantonness, E 1847; passion, D 455. O.F. ragerie.

Ragounces, error for Iagounces, R. 1117 n.

Rake, s. rake, A 287.

Raked, pp. raked, B 3323. Literally, the sentence is—'Amongst hot coals he hath raked himself'; the sense is, of course, 'he hath raked hot coals around himself.' A.S. racian, to rake together; Icel. raka.

Rakel, adj. rash, T. i. 1067; iii. 429, 1630; H 278; hasty, T. iii. 1437. Icel. reikull, wandering.

Rakelnesse, s. rashness, 16. 16; H 283.

Rake-stele, (stèle), s. handle of a rake, D 949. See Stele.

Raket, s. the game of rackets, T. iv. 460.

Rakle, v. behave rashly, T. iii. 1642. See Rakel.

Ram, s. ram, L. 1427; (as prize at a wrestling-match), A 548; Aries, the first sign in the zodiac, A 8, F 386.

Rammish, adj. ramlike, strong-scented, G 887. Cf. Icel. ramr, strong, fetid; which is probably related to A.S. ramm, a ram.

Rampeth, pr. s. (lit. ramps, romps, rears, but here) rages, acts with violence, B 3094. We should now say—'She flies in my face.' The following quotation, in which rampe means an ill-conditioned woman, a romp, is much to the purpose. 'A woman ought not to striue with her husbonde, nor yeue him no displeasaunce nor ansuere her husbonde afore straungers like a rampe, with gret uelonis [felon's] wordes, dispraising him and setting hym atte not [at naught].'—The Knight of la Tour-Landry, ed. Wright, p. 25.

Rancour, s. ill-feeling, ill-will, malice, R. 1261; A 2732, E 432, 747, 802, H 97, I 550, 552.

Ranke, adj. pl. rank, I 913.

Ransake, ger. to ransack, search thoroughly, A 1005; Ransaked, pt. s. ransacked, came searching out, 4, 28.

Rape, s. haste, 8. 7. Icel. hrap, a falling down.

Rape, v.; in phrase rape and renne, corrupted from an older phrase repen and rīnen (A.S. hrepian and hrīnan), i.e. handle and touch, clutch and seize (see note), G 1422.

Rascaille, s. mob, T. v. 1853. A.F. rascaille; see Rascal in my Etym. Dict. and in the Supplement.

Rasour, s. razor, A 2417, B 3246; HF. 690; L. 2654.

Rated, pp. reproved, scolded, A 3463. Short for arated, variant of aretted; see Arette.

Rathe, adv. soon, HF. 2139; T. ii. 1088; iv. 205; v. 937; early, A 3768, B 1289. A.S. hræð.

Rather, adj. comp. former, B 2. p 1. 8; B 2. p 7. 89; T. iii. 1337; v. 1799.

Rather, adv. sooner, 3. 562, 868; B 5. p 3. 141; T. i. 865; A. i. 21. 14; A 1153, B 225, 335, 2265, C 643, E 1169, 1413, 1992; more willingly, A 487; the r., the sooner, 2. 82.

Rattes, pl. rats, C 854, I 605.

Raughte; see Reche.

Raunson, s. ransom, A 1024, 1176, D 411, I 225.

Rave, 2 pr. pl. are mad, T. ii. 116; 1 pr. pl. rave, speak madly, G 959.

Raven, s. raven, 5. 363; the constellation Corvus, HF. 1004; Ravenes, gen. raven's, A 2144; gen. pl. of ravens, T. v. 382.

Ravines, s. pl. rapines, thefts, I. 793. See Ravyne.

Raving, s. madness, F 1026.

Ravinour, s. plunderer, B 4. p 3. 73; Ravineres, pl. B 1. p 3. 57.

Ravisshe, v. snatch away, B 2. m 7. 20; seize, appropriate, B 1. p 3. 25; go r., go and ravish, T. iv. 530; ger. T. v. 895; Ravisshen, pr. pl. seize upon, B 4. p 5. 16; Ravisshedest, 2 pt. s. didst greedily receive, B 3. p 1. 15; Ravysedest, 2 pt. s. didst draw (down), B 1659; Ravisshede, pt. s. carried off, B 4. m 7. 24; Ravisshed, pp. carried away, B 1. p 3. 50; D 1676; ravished, B 4514; rapt, E 1750; overjoyed, F 547; Ravisshinge, part. pres. ravishing, snatching away, B 4. m 6. 25 (Lat. rapiens).

Ravisshing, s. ravishing, T. i. 62; iv. 548.

Ravisshing, adj. swift, violent, B 1. m 5. 3; enchanting, 5. 198; Ravisshinge, violent, B 2. m 2. 4; rapid, swift, B 4. m 6. 7; destroying (Lat. rapidos), B 1. m 5. 40.

Ravyne, s. ravening, greediness, 5. 336; B 2. m 2. 10; ravin, prey, 5. 323; Ravynes, pl. plunderings, B 1. p 4. 51; Ravines, thefts, I 793. O.F. ravine, L. rapina.

Ravysedest, 2 p. s. pt. didst ravish, didst draw (down), B 1659. See Ravisshe.

Rawe, adj. raw, I 900.

Rayed, pp. striped, 3. 252. Cf. rayé, 'streaked'; Cotgrave; from O.F. raie, Low Lat. radia. See Radiatus in Ducange, and Catholicon Anglicum, p. 299, note 1.

Rayhing, pres. pt. arraying, furbishing, A 2503 n. (Bad spelling; read raying.)

Rayled, pp. railed, T. ii. 820.

Rayneth, pr. s. rains, T. iii. 562.

Rëal, adj. royal, regal, B 1. p 4. 105 (see note to 1. 156); T. iii. 1534, 1800 n; v. 1830; L. 214, 284, 1605; B 4366 n; Reales, for Royales, pl. B 2038 n. O.F. real, roial.

Rëaltee, s. royalty, sovereign power, 10. 60. O.F. reialte.

Rëalme, s. realm, kingdom, B 4. p 6. 240 n; Rëaume, L. 2091; B 3305; Rëame, B 4. p 6. 240; L. 1281; Rëaumes, pl. realms, B 3. p 5. 7, 10. See Reme. O.F. reialme.

Rebating, s. abatement, 24. 24 (see vol. iv. p. xxvi).

Rebekke, s. old woman, dame, D 1573. From the name Rebekah.

Rebel, adj. rebellious, A 833, 3046; B 3415; B 2. p 3. 16; 5. 457; 16. 23; Rebél, T. ii. 524; L. 591.

Rebelle, v.; Rebelleth, pr. s. rebels, I 265.

Rebelling, s. rebellion, A 2459.

Rebounde, v. rebound, return, T. iv. 1666.

Rebuked, pp. snubbed, I 444.

Recche, (1), v. reck, care, heed, 5. 593; B 2. p 3. 62; T. i. 797; iv. 1588; D 319; ger. T. ii. 338; care for, T. iv. 1447; is nought to r., no matter for, T. ii. 434; Recche, 1 pr. s. reck, 5. 606; T. iii. 112; A 1398, 2245, B 94, G 489; Reccheth, pr. s. recks, cares, A 2397; 6. 52; Recche, 2 pr. pl. 7. 269, 335; Recche of it, care for it, pr. pl. F 71; it recche, pr. s. subj. may care for it, T. iv. 630; Roghte, pt. s. recked, cared, regarded, 3. 887; 4. 126; 5. 111; A 3772; B 4530; impers. he cared, L. 605; E 685; 1 pt. s. subj. 3. 244; Roughte, pt. s. recked, cared, T. i. 496; iv. 667; v. 450; impers. 1. 171; R. 341; 2 pt. pl. HF. 1781; Roughte, 1 pt. s. subj. would not care, T. i. 1039; pt. s. subj. T. ii. 1428. A.S. rēcan, rēccan.

Recche (2), pr. s. subj. interpret, expound, B 4086. A.S. reccan, reccean.

Recchelees, adj. careless, reckless, R. 340; 5. 593; HF. 397; B 229, 4297, 4626, E 488, H 279; careless of duty, A 179 n; regardless, HF. 668.

Recchelesnesse, s. recklessness, I 111, 611.

Receit, s. receipt, i.e. recipe for making a mixture, G 1353, 1366.

Receyven, v. receive, E 1151; Receyved, pp. 1. 35; accepted, hence, acceptable, B 307; Receyveth, imp. pl. receive, C 926.

Rechased, pp. headed back, 3. 379. Lit. 'chased back.'

Reche, v. reach, give, hand over, 3. 47; Raughte, pt. s. reached, A 3696, B 1921; reached up to, A 2915; reached (out, or forward), A 136; proceeded, T. ii. 446; Reighte, pt. s. reached, touched, HF. 1374; Raughten, pt. pl. R. 1022. See reken and recchen in Stratmann.

Recke, v. reck, B 2. p 3. 62 n. See Recche (1).

Reclaiming, s. enticement, L. 1371. See below.

Reclayme, v. reclaim (as a hawk by a lure), i.e. check, H 72.

Recomaunde, v. recommend, T. ii. 1070, iv. 1693, v. 1414; 1 pr. s. T. v. 1323; commend, 25. 27 (see vol. iv. p. xxviii); 2 pr. s. subj. mayest recommend, T. i. 1056; Recomandeth, pr. s. refl. commends (herself), B 278.

Recomende, ger. to commend, commit, G 544.

Recomforte, ger. to comfort again, T. ii. 1672; 2 pr. pl. subj. comfort again, T. v. 1395. See Reconforte.

Recompensacioun, s. recompense, B 4. p 4. 200; HF. 665, 1557.

Reconciled, pp. re-consecrated, I 965. See Reconsiled.

Reconciliacioun, s. reconciliation, B 2880.

Reconforte, v. comfort again, A 2852, B 2168; Reconforted, pt. s. encouraged, B 2850. See Recomforte.

Reconissaunce, s. recognizance, B 1520.

Reconsiled, pp. reconciled, B 2208.

Record, s. record, report, D 2049; Recorde, testimony, 3. 934.

Recorde, v. witness, bear in mind, A 1745; remember, T. v. 445; (to) record, recording, 5. 609; Recorde, 1 pr. s. bring (it) to your remembrance, A 829; Recordest, 2 pr. s. callest to mind, B 3. p 12. 2; Recordeth, pr. s. remembers, B 3. m 11. 34; Recorde, pr. pl. record, tell, L. 2484; Recordedest, 2 pt. s. subj. wouldst remind, B 3. p 10. 126; Recordinge, pres. pt. remembering, T. v. 718; recalling, pondering on, T. iii. 51; L. 1760; Recorde, imp. pl. refl. remember, T. iii. 1179.

Recours, s. recourse, B 2632; resort, T. ii. 1352; wol have my r., will return, F 75; Recourses, s. pl. orbits, B 1. m 2. 9.

Recovere, v. regain, get, T. iv. 406; Recoveren, pr. pl. recover, R. 57; Recovered, pp. gained, won, got, 5. 688; regained, HF. 1258; B 27; healed, T. i. 37.

Recoverer, s. recovery, 22. 3 (see note). O.F. recovrier, recoverer, 'ressource, secours, remède': Godefroy.

Recreant, adj. recreant, cowardly, I 698; Recréaunt, T. i. 814. O.F. recreant.

Reddour, s. violence, sway, vehemence, 10. 13. O. F. rador, radour, 'rapidité, impétuosité, vigueur, violence': Godefroy.

Rede, v. read, 5. 10; 22. 67; A. 709, C 107; advise, counsel, L. 2217; interpret, 3. 279; ger. to read, B 1690, G 206; L. 30; to advise, T. i. 83; Reden, v. interpret, divine, T. ii. 129; go r., go and read, L. 1457; ger. to read, F 1429; to study, F 1120; Rede, 1 pr. s. advise, counsel, R. 38; 4. 15; 5. 566; A 3068, B 2329, C 285, E 811, 1205; read, HF. 77; B 1095, C 508; pr. s. subj. may (He) advise, HF. 1067; Ret, pr. s. advises, T. ii. 413; Redeth, pr. s. advises, T. iv. 573; Rede, 2 pr. pl. L. 1178; Redde, pt. s. read, D 714, 721; interpreted, 3. 281; Radde, pt. s. read, T. ii. 1085; D 791; advised, 5. 579; Radde, 2 pt. pl. advised, T. v. 737; Redden, pt. pl. read, B 1. p 1. 20; T. ii. 1706; F 713; Red, pp. read, 3. 224, 1326; 5. 107; HF. 347; T. iii. 192, v. 1797; D 765; Rad, pp. read, B 4311, C 176, G 211; read over, A 2595; Reed, imp. s. read, H 344; Redeth, imp. pl. read, B 3650, D 982, 1168.

Rede, dat. counsel, T. iv. 679; see Reed.

Rede, adj. red; see Reed.

Rede, adj. made of reed; referring to a musical instrument in which the sound was produced by the vibration of a reed, HF. 1221.

Rede (rèèdə), s. red (i.e. gold), T. iii. 1384; the blood, B 356; red wine, C 526, 562. See Reed, adj.

Redelees, adj. without reed or counsel; not knowing which way to turn, 2. 27.

Redely, adv. soon, HF. 1392; readily, truly, HF. 1127, 2137. See Redily.

Redempcioun, s. ransom, T. iv. 108.

Redere, s. reader, T. v. 270; Reder, 5. 132.

Redily, adv. quickly, promptly, R. 379; C 667.

Redoutable, adj. renowned, B 4. p 5. 6.

Redoute, v. fear, B 1. p 3. 15; Redouted, pp. feared, B 2. p 7. 44; B 3. p 4. 44.

Redoutinge, s. reverence, A 2050. See above.

Redresse, s. redress, 4. 162.

Redresse, v. redress, 4. 192; set right, T. v. 1381; E 431; redeem, D 696; ger. to redress, redress, set right, 13. 8; T. iii. 1008; Redresseth, pr. s. amends, I 1039; Redressen, pr. pl. refl. erect (themselves) again, rise again, T. ii. 969; Redressed, pt. s. reasserted, vindicated, F. 1436; Redresse, imp. s. reform, 1. 129; Redressed, pp. roused, B 4. p 2. 99. O. F. redresser.

Reducen, v. sum up, B 3. p 8. 40.

Redy, adj. ready, A 21, 352; D 1321, 1339, E 299, F 114, 1210; dressed, T. v. 57; F 387; at hand, 2. 104; 3. 1256.

Reed, s. reed, T. ii. 1387.

Reed, s. counsel, advice, plan, 3. 105; 5. 586; R. 1615, 1618; T. i. 661; ii. 389; L. 631, 1987, 2024; A 1216, 3527, B 3739, C 146, 744, E 653; profit, help, remedy, 3. 203; counsel, adviser, A 665; I can no r., I know not what to do, 3. 1187; without reed, helpless, 3. 587; to rede, for a counsel; best to rede, best for a counsel, best to do, T. iv. 679 (not a verb).

Reed (rèèd), adj. red, 5. 583; L. 535; A 153, 294, 456, 458, 1910, 3317, B 2059, 3734, E 317; (of the complexion), 3. 470; Rede, (rèèdə), adj. def. red, 5. 442; 7. 1; A 957, 1747, B 4118, F 415; indef. (rare), 3. 856; L. 2589; Rede, pl. 1. 89; 3. 955; 4. 2, 27; 5. 186; A 90, 3319, F 1148. A.S. rēad. See below.

Reed, s. red colour, redness, L. 533. See Rede.

Reed, imp. s. read, H. 344. See Rede.

Reednesse, s. redness, G 1097, 1100.

Rees, s. race, great haste, T. iv. 350. A.S. rǣs.

Refect, pp. refected, restored, B 4. p 6. 257.

Referren, ger. to refer, B 3. p 2. 42; Refere, v. return, T. i. 266; Referred, pp. brought back, B 3. p 10. 123; reduced, B 3. p 11. 155; referred, B 5. p 3. 127.

Refet, pp. recreated, B 4. p 6. 257 n.

Refiguringe, pres. pt. reproducing, T. v. 473.

Reflexions, s. pl. reflexions by means of mirrors, F 230; Reflexiouns, reflections, thoughts, HF. 22.

Refreininge, s. refrain, burden, R. 749.

Refreyden, v. grow cold, T. v. 507; Refreyde, v. T. ii. 1343; Refreyded, pp. cooled, I 341; Refreyd, cooled down, 12. 21.

Refreyn, s. refrain, T. ii. 1571.

Refreyne, v. bridle, curb, I 385; Refreyneth, pr. s. curbs, I 294.

Refresshe, ger. to refresh, recreate, A 2622; Refresshed, pp. refreshed, L. 1081; solaced, D 38; encouraged, D 1767.

Refresshinge, s. renewing, I 78.

Reft, -e; see Reve.

Refuge, s. place of flight, escape, A 1720.

Refus, (refyys), pp. as adj. refused, rejected, T. i. 570. See below.

Refuse, v.; Refuseden, pt. pl. refused, E 128; Refused, pp. 10. 41; Refuseth, imp. pl. T. ii. 1211.

Refut, s. place of refuge, refuge, 1. 14; B 3. m 10. 5; T. iii. 1014; B 546, 852, G 75; safety, 1. 33. O. F. refuit.

Regal, adj. royal, B 1. p 4. 85.

Regals, pl. royalties, royal attributes, L. 2128.

Regalye, s. rule, authority, 2. 65.

Regard, to the r. of, in comparison with, B 2. p 7. 77; at r. of, in regard to, in comparison to, 5. 58; I 1059.

Regioun, s. region, realm, A 2082; 15. 25; L. 995.

Registre, s. story, narrative, A 2812.

Regne, s. kingdom, dominion, realm, 10. 45; L. 1413; T. iii. 29; A 866, 1638, B 389, 392, 735, 3401, 3404, 3432, F 135, I 79, 136, 867; dominion, rule, A 1624; Regnes, pl. kingdoms, T. v. 1544; L. 22, 585; A 2373, B 181, 3518; governments, B 3954. O.F. regne.

Regnen, ger. to reign, B 3. p 2. 24; Regnest, 2 pr. s. reignest, T. v. 1864; Regneth, pr. s. 4. 43; L. 1008; has dominion, B 776; prevails throughout, reigns in, T. ii. 379; Regnen, pr. pl. 4. 50; B 1. m 7. 15; Regned, pt. s. reigned, B 3845; L. 582.

Reherce, v. rehearse, repeat with exactitude, A 732, 3170; rehearse, F 1466; Rehercen, v. rehearse, repeat, L. 78; D 1308; F 298; ger. to enumerate, I 239; Reherse, v. rehearse, enumerate, A. pr. 47; repeat, tell, 3. 474; recount, B 89, E 1221, G 786; Rehersen, v. rehearse, repeat, 3. 1204; T. ii. 572; Reherce, imp. s. repeat, T. ii. 1029; Rehersed, pp. told, L. 1464; Rehersinge, pres. pt. relating, F 206.

Rehersaille, s. rehearsal, enumeration, G 852. See above.

Rehersing, s. rehearsal, A 1650; recital, L. 1185; Rehersinges, pl. repetitions, L. 24.

Reighte, pt. s. reached, touched, HF. 1374. Pt. t. of reche.

Reine, s. kingdom, R. 448. See Regne.

Reines, s. pl. rain-storms, HF. 967.

Reioisinge (rejoising), source of rejoicing, H 246.

Reioye (rejoiə), v. rejoice, T. v. 395.

Reioyse, (rejoisə), ger. to make rejoice, 1. 101; Reioyse, 1 pr. s. feel glad, T. v. 1165; Reioysen, pr. pl. rejoice, E 1993; Reioysed, 1 pt. s. refl. E 145.

Reke, v.; Reketh, pr. s. smokes, reeks, L. 2612.

Rekene, ger. to reckon, A 401; Rekenen, v. E 2433; Rekened, 1 pt. s. 3. 20; Rekene, imp. s. A. ii. 1. 1. See Rekne.

Rekening, s. reckoning, account, 3. 699; A 600; Rekeninge, judgement, 1. 132; reckoning, I 166; Rekeninges, pl. accounts, HF. 653; A 760, B 1408, H 74.

Rekever, 1 pr. s. (for future), (I) shall retrieve, do away, HF. 354.

Rekke, 1 pr. s. care, C 405, E 1090; Rekkest, 2 pr. s. carest, D 1453; Rekketh, pr. s. recks, cares, B 2837, G 632; pr. s. impers. (it) recks (him), he cares, 7. 182; L. 365; yow r., you reck, 7. 303; what r. me, what do I care, D 53; Rekke, 2 pr. pl. reck, 2. 110; imp. s. care, B 4004, G 698.

Rekne, v. reckon (also 1 pr. s.), A 1933; v. L. 2510; B 110; ger. B 158. See Rekene.

Relayes, s. pl. fresh sets of hounds, reserve packs, 3. 362.

Relees, s. release, 1. 3; ceasing; out of relees, without ceasing, G 46. O. F. relais, releis, reles.

Relente, v. melt, G 1278. From prefix re-, again; and Lat. lentare, to bend; from Lat. lentus, pliant.

Relesing, s. remission, I 1026.

Relesinge, s. release, B 3. m 12. 21.

Relesse, v. release, I 810; ger. to relieve, release, B 1069; Relesse, 1 pr. s. release, E 153, F 1533, 1613; Relesedest, 2 pt. s. forgavest, I 309; Relessed, pt. s. released, I 809; forgave, B 3367.

Releve, ger. to raise up, relieve, T. v. 1042; v. 10. 77; B 2680; Releeved, pp. restored, I 945; Releved, pp. revived, L. 128; recompensed, A 4182; made rich again, G 872; Releve, imp. s. relieve, 1. 6.

Relevinge, s. remedy, I 804.

Religioun, s. religion, A 477; state of religion, life of a nun, R. 429; a religious order, B 3134; the religious orders, B 3144.

Religious, adj. belonging to a religious order, B 3150; devoted to a religious order, T. ii. 759; as s., a monk or nun, I 891.

Relik, s. relic, L. 321; Relikes, pl. A 701.

Reme, s. realm, B 1306; Remes, pl. B 4326. See Realme.

Remede, s. remedy, T. i. 661, iv. 889, 1272. See below.

Remédie, s. remedy, B 3974; Remedye, 5. 140; Remedyes, pl. remedies, A 475; Remedies, pl. (Ovid's) Remedia Amoris, 3. 568. See above.

Rémembráunce, s. memory, 7. 211, 350; 24. 1 (see vol. iv. p. xxv); Remembrance, I 134.

Remembre, v. remember, I 135; Remembre, pr. pl. remind, F 1243; Remembreth, pr. s. recurs to the mind, 4. 150; Remembringe him, calling to remembrance, T. ii. 72; Remembreth, imper. pl. remember, F 1542, I 136; Remembre yow of, remember, 3. 717.

Remenant, s. remainder, rest, 5. 271; L. 304, 623; A. i. 4. 5; A 888, 2277, 3166, C 275, E 869, F 1286, G 1004; Remenaunt, rest, remnant, remainder, R. 1024, 1596, 1692; A 724, F 1575.

Remeve, v. remove, T. i. 691; Remoeve, 3 pr. pl. subj. F 993; Remewed, pp. removed, B 1. p 4. 172; F 181; Remeve, imp. s. move, A. ii. 2. 2; Remewe, A. ii. 5. 14; Remeveth, imp. pl. remove ye, G 1008. See Remuen.

Remorde, pr. s. subj. cause (you) remorse, T. iv. 1491; fill with remorse, T. v. 1386 n; Remordeth, pr. s. vexes, plagues, troubles, B 4. p 6 182. O. F. remordre, 'causer du remords à, tourmenter': Godefroy.

Remors, s. remorse, T. i. 554.

Remounted, pp. strengthened, comforted, B 3. p 1. 6.

Remuable (1), adj. changeable, variable, T. iv. 1682. O. F. remuable; where muable is from Lat. mutabilis: see Godefroy. (See below.)

Remuable (2), adj. capable of motion (Lat. mobilibus), B 5. p 5. 23. Formed, apparently, from remuen, to remove (see below), but confused with the above.

Remuen, v. remove, B 2. p 6. 34 (Lat. amouebis). See Remeve.

Ren, s. run, A 4079.

Renably, adv. reasonably, D 1509. O. F. raisnable, resnable, reasonable; the s is lost before n in A. F. and M.E.

Rende, v. rend, T. iv. 1493; Rent, pr. s. rends, tears, L. 646 a; Renden, pr. pl. rend in pieces, destroy, B 3. p 12. 91; Rente, pt. s. tore, T. ii. 928, iii. 1099; A 990; Rendinge, pres. pl. tearing, B 2163; tearing, B 1. m 1. 3 (see note); Rent, pp. torn, HF. 776. See Renten.

Rending, s. tearing, A 2834.

Renegat, s. renegade, apostate, L. 401 a; B 932.

Renewe, v. renew, 8. 5.

Reneye, v. deny, renounce, abjure, B 376, 3751, G 268, 448, 459; 1 pr. s. subj. may renounce, G 464; Reneyed, 1 pt. pl. B 340; pp. L. 336; B 915. O. F. reneier.

Reneyinge, s. denying, I 793.

Renged, pp. ranged, placed in rows, R. 1380.

Renges, pl. ranks, A 2594. O. F. renge, 'rang, file': Godefroy.

Renne (1), v. run, 5. 247; HF. 202; R. 111; I 721; ger. 1. 164; A 3890, C 796, G 1415; Rennen, v. B 3454; Renne, 1 pr. s. L. 60; Renneth, pr. s. runs, D 76, F 479, G 905; is current, E 1986; approaches quickly, T. ii. 1754; goes easily, A. i. 2. 1; continues, A. ii. 3. 48; runs, finds way, A 1761; arises, L. 503; spreads, L. 1423; renneth for, runs in favour of, B 125 (see note); Renne, pr. pl. run, A 2868, 4065; Rennen, pr. pl. A 4100; concur, B 5. p 1. 68; Ronnen, pt. pl. ran, 3. 163; T. iv. 130; A 2925, 3827; Ronne, pt. pl. B 4578; Ronnen, pp. advanced, lit. run, R. 320; Ronne, pp. run, T. ii. 1464; B 2; is r., has run, has found its way (into), HF. 1644; Renninge, pres. pt. HF. 2145; Renning, flowing, 3. 161. A.S. irnan; Icel. renna.

Renne (2), v.; only in the phrase rape and renne, G 1422. See Rape.

Renner, s. runner, D 1283.

Renning, s. running, A 551.

Renomed, pp. renowned, B 3. p 2. 76; B 3. p 4. 14.

Renomee, s. renown, L. 1513; D 1159. O. F. renommee, 'bruit': Godefroy.

Renoun, s. renown, fame, 2. 88; L. 260, 522; A 316; Rénoun, 2. 63, 86; HF. 1406.

Renovelances, s. pl. renewals, HF. 693. O. F. renovelance.

Renovelle, v. renew, B 3035; Renovellen, v. renew, are renewed, I 1027; Renovele, 1 pr. s. 25. 9 (see vol. iv. p. xxvii); Renovelen, pr. pl. renew themselves, B 3. p 11. 91; Renovelled, pp. B 3036; Renoveleth, imp. pl. 4. 19. O. F. renoveler.

Rent, -e; see Rende.

Rente, s. revenue, income, A 256, 373, 1443, B 1142, 3401, 3572, D 1373, 1451; stipend, B 3. p 4. 57; payment, tribute, 3. 765; to r., as a tribute, T. ii. 830; Rentes, pl. rents, E 1313.

Renten, v. rend, L. 843 n; Rentinge, pres. pt. rending, B 2163 n.

Rentinge, s. rending, A 2834 n.

Repair, s. resort, repairing, B 1211, D 1224.

Repaire, ger. to go home, B 1516; to repair, find a home, T. iii. 5; to go back (to), HF. 755; Repaire, v. return, F 589; Repaireth, pr. s. returns, B 967; goes, B 3885; Repeirede, pt. s. returned, B 1. m 3. 2; Repaired, pp. L. 1136. See Repeyre.

Reparaciouns, pl. reparations, making up, HF. 688.

Repeled, pp. repealed, T. iv. 294, 560.

Repentaunce, s. penitence, 3. 1114; A 1776; I 94.

Repentaunt, adj. repentant, penitent, A 228; Repentant, B 3075.

Repente, ger. to repent, R. 1670; v. 18. 56; v. reflex. 3. 1116; E 1846; Repenten, v. L. 339.

Répenting, s. repentance, L. 147; Répentinge, L. 156; without r., free from after-regret, 4. 17.

Repeyre, v. repair, return, T. v. 1571; Repeireth, pr. s. F 339; Repeyreth, imp. pl. T. v. 1837; Repeiring, pres. pt. returning, F 608. See Repaire.

Repleccioun, s. repletion, B 4027; Replecciouns, pl. B 4113.

Repleet, adj. replete, full, B 4147; Replet, C 489.

Replenissed, pp. filled, I 1079.

Replicacioun, s. reply, A 1846; repartee, 5. 536; replication, involution, B 3. p 12. 120.

Replye, v. object, E 1609; reply, L. 343.

Report, s. T. i. 593; Réport, rumour, L. 726.

Reporte, v. report, relate, tell, C 438; Reporten, v. F 72; Reported, pp. E 2435.

Reportour, s. reporter, A 814. (The host is so called because he receives and remembers the tales; they were all addressed to him in particular. Thus 'reporter' has here almost the sense of 'umpire.')

Reprehencioun, s. reproval, reproof, T. i. 684.

Reprehende, v. reproach, T. i. 510; Reprehenden, pr. pl. reproach, blame, criticise, B 3. p 12. 93.

Represente, v. represent, 18. 58.

Represseth, pr. s. 1. 142; Repressed, pp. T. iii. 1033; kept under, L. 2591.

Repressioun, s. repression, T. iii. 1038.

Répreváble, adj. reprehensible, C 632, I 431; r. to, likely to cast a slur on, 15. 24.

Repreve, s. reproof, B 2413, D 16, E 2204; shame, C 595; reproach, T. ii. 419, 1140; E 2206, I 625; Repreves, pl. I 258.

Repreve, v. reproach, F 1537; reprove, H 70; Repreveth, pr. s. L. 1566; I 33; Repreve, 2 pr. pl. D 1177; pr. s. subj. D 937; Repreve, imp. s. reproach, T. i. 669; imp. pl. D 1206; Repreved, pp. B 2544.

Reproved, pp. as adj. blamed, accused, R. 1135; Reproeved, pp. stultified, B 2. p 6. 80. See above.

Repugnen, ger. to be repugnant (to), B 5. p 3. 5.

Reputacioun, s. repute, C 602, 626; reputation, H 185, 199.

Requerable, adj. desirable, B 2. p 6. 20.

Requeren, ger. to be sought after, B 3. p 10. 166; v. entreat, seek, B 2927; Requere, v. ask, D 1052; Requere, 1 pr. s. require, demand, T. ii. 358; ask, D 1010; Requerest, 2 pr. s. seekest, B 4. m 1. 25; Requireth, pr. s. 4. 155; Requeren, 2 pr. pl. ask, T. v. 1600; Requere, 2 pr. pl. T. ii. 473; Requeren, pr. pl. ask (for), B 2873; Requere, 2 pr. s. subj. require, T. i. 902; Requered, pp. sought after, B 3. p 10. 155, p 11. 22; required, necessitated, T. iii. 405.

Requeste, s. request, 10. 76; T. iv. 57; L. 448; D 1060; Réqueste, A 1819, 2685.

Resalgar, s. realgar, G 814. 'Realgar, a combination of sulphur and arsenic, of a brilliant red colour as existing in nature; red orpiment': Webster. F. réalgar, answering to an O. F. resalgar, Low Lat. risigallum.

Resceived, pp. received; wel resceived, favourably situated with respect to other planets, &c.; A. ii. 4. 32. See Receyve.

Rescous, s. a rescue, help, T. iii. 1242; rescue, T. i. 478; A 2643. O. F. rescous.

Rescowe, v. (to) rescue, save, T. iii. 857; rescue, T. v. 231; Rescowede, pt. s. rescued, B 2. p 2. 45; Rescowed, pt. s. L. 515. O. F. rescorre.

Rescowinge, s. rescuing, I 805.

Rese, ger. to shake, A 1986. A.S. hrisian, hrysian.

Résembláble, adj. alike, R. 985.

Resemble, v. D 90.

Reserved, pp. kept, A 188.

Residue, remainder, A. ii. 44. 29.

Resigne, 1 pr. s. resign, 1. 80; T. i. 432; pr. pl. abandon, T. iii. 25.

Résisténce, s. resistance, T. iii. 990; G 909.

Resolven, pr. pl. flow out, B 5. m 1. 1; Resolved, pp. dissolved, melted, B 2. p 7. 101; B 4. m 5. 20; held in solution, B 1. m 7. 6.

Resonable, adj. reasonable, R. 1499; B 3793; rational, B 1. p 6. 47; endowed with reason, B 5. p 4. 138; talkative, 3. 534; Resonables, adj. pl. reasoning, B 5. p 6. 7.

Resoninge, s. reasoning, T. iv. 1046.

Resort, s. resource, T. iii. 134.

Resoun, s. reason, right, A 37, 847; Resóun, B 3408; argument, B 4. p 6. 256; value, B 2. p 7. 18; speech, sentence, T. i. 796; Reson, reason, E 25; Resons, pl. reasons, A 274.

Resoune, v.; Resóuneth, pr. s. resounds, A 1278; Resóuned, pt. s. F 413; Resowninge, pres. pt. resounding, B 3. m 12. 14.

Respecte (better Respect), s. regard, A. i. 21. 51; to respect, in respect, T. iv. 86; v. 1818.

Resport, s. regard, T. iv. 86, 850. Godefroy gives: 'Report, resport, sentence arbitrale, rapport.'

Respyt, s. delay, B 948; respite, delay, reprieve, 5. 648; R. 1612; G 543; withoute more respyt, without delay, forthwith, R. 1488; out of more respyt, without any delay, without any hesitation, T. v. 137. O. F. respit.

Respyte, ger. to refuse to do, hesitate, 7. 259; Respyten, ger. to respite, F 1582.

Resseyveth, pr. s. receives, A. i. 3. 2. See Receyve.

Reste, s. rest, repose, 1. 14; L. 198, 201; F 355; Rest (once only?), 5. 94; at reste, at rest, fixed, T. ii. 760; at his reste, as in its home, 5. 376; to reste, (gone) to rest, A 30; Restes, pl. times of repose, T. ii. 1722.

Reste, v. remain (with), T. iii. 1435; rest, repose, T. ii. 1326; ger. to rest, 5. 265; F 606; 2 pr. pl. subj. may rest, F 126.

Restelees, adv. restlessly, R. 370.

Resteles, adj. restless, 10. 70; T. iii. 1584; Restelees, C 728.

Resting-place, s. 3. 1005.

Resting-whyles, pl. times of repose, leisure, B 1. p 4. 31.

Restore, v. T. iv. 1347; Restored, pt. s. A 991.

Restreyne, v. restrain, 7. 235; T. i. 676; B 3796; Restrayne, B 3777; Restreinest, 2 pr. s. shortenest, B 1. m 5. 11.

Resurreccioun, s. resurrection, i.e. re-opening (of the daisy), L. 110.

Ret, for Redeth, pr. s. advises, T. ii. 413. See Rede.

Retentif, adj. retentive, I 913.

Retenue, s. retinue, troop of retainers, suite, A 2502; E 270; at his r., among those retained by him, D 1355.

Rethor, s. orator, B 4397, F 38.

Rethorien, adj. rhetorical, B 2. p 1. 29. O. F. rethorien (Godefroy).

Rethorien (written Retorien), s. orator, B 2. p 3. 39; Rethoriens, pl. rhetoricians, B 2. p 6. 69. Rethorien, 'rhéteur': Godefroy.

Rethorike, s. rhetoric, B 2. p 3. 7; Rethoryke, HF. 859, E 32; Rethoryk, rhetoric, F 719, 726.

Retorien; see Rethorien.

Retourne, v. return, R. 382, 384; Retorne, v. L. 2477; Retorneth, pr. s. brings back, B 5. p 6. 192; Retourneth, pr. s. returns, I 138; Retourned, pp. returned, B 2163; Retorning, pres. pt. revolving, T. v. 1023; Retourneth, imp. pl. E 809.

Retourninge, s. return, A 2095.

Retracciouns, s. pl. retractions, things which I withdraw, I 1085. 'Retraction, action de se retirer'; Godefroy. (Not so strong as revocation.)

Retreteth, pr. s. reconsiders, B 5. m 3. 36. Lit. 'treats again.'

Retrograd, adj. moving in a direction contrary to that of the sun's motion in the ecliptic, A. ii. 4. 33, 35. 12. Spoken with reference to a planet's apparent motion.

Rette, 2 pr. pl. repute, A 726 n. See Arette.

Reule, s. rule, 10. 56; A 173. See Rewle.

Reulen, v. rule, B 4234; Reule hir, guide her conduct, E 327; Reuleth, pr. s. rules, T. ii. 1377; Reuled, pp. ruled, A 816. See Rewlen.

Reuthe, s. ruth, 1. 127. See Routhe, Rewthe.

Reve (réévə), s. reeve, steward, bailiff, A 542, 3860; Reves, gen. A 599. A.S. gerēfa.

Reve (rèèvə), ger. to rob (from), T. iv. 285; to take away, G 376; to r. no man fro his lyf, to take away no man's life, L. 2693; Reven, ger. to reave, plunder, I 758; to bereave, T. i. 188; Reven, v. take away, 10. 50; Reve, v. bereave, T. ii. 1659; Reveth, pr. s. forces away, 5. 86; Rafte, pt. s. bereft, L. 1855; D 888; reft, B 3288, 3291; took from, B 4. m 7. 23; Refte, pt. s. bereft, HF. 457; Raft, pp. torn, reft, T. v. 1258; taken from, L. 2590; bereaved, F 1017; bereft, L. 2325. A.S. rēafian.

Revel, s. revelry, sport, A 2717, 4397, E 392, 1123, F 278, 339, 1015; 12. 6; L. 2255, 2674; minstrelsy, A 4402; Revels, pl. revels, C 65.

Revelacioun, s. revelation, HF. 8; D 1854; Revelaciouns, pl. T. v. 366.

Revelour, s. (the) Reveller, A 4371; a reveller, A 4391, D 443.

Revelous, adj. fond of revelry, B 1194. O. F. revelous.

Reverberacioun, s. reverberation, vibration, D 2234.

Reverdye, s. rejoicing, R. 720. O. F. reverdie, 'feuillée, verdure; chant de May; joie, allégresse': Godefroy.

Reverence, s. respect, A 141; respectful manner, A 305; reverence, A 312, H 142; L. 32, 52, 98; fear, I 294; respect, honour, E 196; thy r., the respect shewn to thee, B 116.

Reverent, adj. worthy of reverence, B 3. p 4. 2; reverend, A. pr. 61; Reverents, adj. pl. reverend, B 3. m 4. 6.

Reverently, adv. E 187.

Revers, s. reverse, contrary, 18. 32; Révers, 14. 6; B 4167, D 2056.

Reverye, for Revelrye, A 4005 n.

Revesten, pr. pl. clothe again, T. iii. 353.

Revoken, ger. to recall, T. iii. 1118; Revoke, 1 pr. s. withdraw, recall, I 1085.

Revolucioun, s. complete circuit, A. ii. 7. 13; revolving course (orbit), 4. 30.

Revyled, pp. reviled, I 623.

Reward, s. regard, attention, T. ii. 1133, v. 1736; B 2449, I 151, 435; L. 1622; Réward, consideration, L. 375, 399; having reward to, considering, 5. 426; take r. of, have regard, I 151.

Rewde, adj. rude, plain, unadorned, A. pr. 31.

Rewe, s. row, line, HF. 1692; L. 285 a, A 2866; by rewe, in order, D 506. A.S. rǣw.

Rewe, ger. to have pity, A 2382; Rewe, v. rue, have pity, 4. 203; 6. 101; L. 158, 1842; T. i. 460, 462; be sorry, T. ii. 455; do penance for, G 447; Rewen, ger. to have pity, E 1050; Rewest, 2 pr. s. hast pity, B 854; Reweth, pr. s. impers. makes (me) sorry, I am sorry, A 3462, B 4287, E 2432; Rewe, pr. s. subj. may (He) have pity, 7. 287; A 1863; Rewed, pt. s. had pity, L. 1237; Rewe, imp. s. B 853; Reweth, imp. pl. F 974.

Rewel-boon, s. (probably) ivory made from the teeth of whales, B 2068. See note.

Rewful, adj. lamentable, sad, L. 1838; sad (one), B 854.

Rewfulleste, adj. sup. most sorrowful, A 2886.

Rewfully, adv. sadly, T. iii. 65.

Rewle, s. the revolving long and narrow plate or rod used for measuring and taking altitudes, A. i. 1. 4, 13. 1 (see fig. 3); it revolves at the back of the Astrolabe; Rewles, pl. rules, A. pr. 19. See Reule.

Rewlen, v. rule, T. v. 758; Rewledest, 2 pr. s. didst control, B 1. p 4. 153. See Reulen.

Rewliche, adj. pitiable, B 2. p 2. 43.

Rewme, s. realm, R. 495. See Realme.

Rewthe, s. ruth, pity, E 579, 893, F 438; a pitiful sight, E 562. See Reuthe.

Rewthelees, adj. ruthless, unpitying, 5. 613; 6. 31.

Reye, s. rye, D 1746.

Reyes, pl. round dances, HF. 1236. See note. Mid. Du reye, 'a round daunce': Hexham.

Reyn, s. rain, A 492, 595, B 1864, 3363, 3921; F 1250; rain-shower, storm of rain, A 3517, D 732.

Reyne, s. rein, A 4083, F 313; bridle, 26. 32 (see vol. iv. p. xxx); Reynes, pl. reins, HF. 951; A 904. O.F. resne, F. rêne.

Reyne, s. reign, F 755. See Regne.

Reyne, v. rain down, T. v. 1336; rain, 4. 287; ger. to rain, 10. 62; T. iii. 551; Reyneth, pr. s. rains, A 1535; Reyned, pt. s. rained, T. iii. 1557. See Ron.

Reynen, ger. to reign, rule, 9. 60.

Reynes, s. pl. reins (of the body), loins, I 863.

Reyse, ger. to raise, T. ii. 1585; G 861; to build up, D 2102; r. up, to exact, 'realise,' D 1390; Reysed, pp. raised, 3. 1278; T. v. 1471. Icel. reisa.

Reysed, pp. gone on a military expedition, A 54. O.F. reise, 'expédition militaire, incursion sur une terre ennemie': Godefroy. From O.H.G. reisa.

Rhetorice, Rhetoric, B 2. p 1. 31.

Rib, s. I 928; Ribbes, pl. ribs, D 506.

Riban, s. ribbon, used as pl. ribbons, HF. 1318.

Ribaninges, pl. silk trimmings, borders, R. 1077.

Ribaudye, s. ribaldry, ribald jesting, A 3866, C 324, I 464.

Ribible, s. rebeck, lute with two strings, A 4396. O.F. rebebe, 'rebec': Godefroy. From Arab. rabāb.

Ribybe, s. term of reproach for an old woman, D 1377 (see note).

Riche, adj. rich, A 311; pl. A 296, B 122; rich people, A 248.

Richely, adv. richly, 2. 38; F 90.

Richesse, s. riches, wealth, 18. 12; L. 1253; B 107, 3432, 3750, D 1110, 1118; Wealth (personified), R. 1033; 5. 261; Richesses, pl. wealth, riches, B 1. p 4. 68; B 2. m 2. 2; B 2560, I 186. O.F. richesse.

Rideled, pp. plaited, gathered in (at the neck, or waist), R. 1235, 1243. 'Ridelé, plissé'; Godefroy.

Rĭden, pt. pl. and pp. rode, ridden; see Ryde.

Riet, 'rete,' A. i. 3. 3, 9. 3, 21. 1. The 'rete' or 'net' is the circular plate with many openings which revolves within the 'mother.' See fig. 2.

Right, adj. straight, upright, R. 1701; Righte, def. right, 1. 75; own, T. ii. 1065; F 1311; Right assencioun, right ascension, A. ii. 28. 21; see note (iii. 363).

Right, adv. just, exactly, R. 1301; A 257, 535, F 193, 492; precisely, T. ii. 286; wholly, C 58; even, B 2173, F 1614, I 113; Right as, just as if, B 5. p 1. 50; Right that, that very thing, 3. 1307.

Right, s. 1. 21; by right, justly, 1. 22; B 44; by alle r., in all justice, T. ii. 763; Rightes, pl. rights, true reasons, B 3. m 11. 26; at alle rightes, in all respects, fully, A 1100, 1852.

Rightful, adj. perfect; rightful age, (in) her prime, R. 405; just, 1. 31, 132; righteous, 5. 55; B 1. m 5. 29; I 236, 700; just, lawful, I 744.

Rightfully, adv. justly, L. 324 a.

Rightwis, adj. righteous, just, L. 905; Rightwys, L. 373.

Rightwisnesse, s. righteousness, B 5. p 3. 135; B 2599, C 637, D 1909; justice, 10. 66; 14. 8.

Rigour, s. severity, harshness, F 775.

Rikne, imp. s. reckon, compute, A. ii. 27. 6; Rikened, 1 pt. s. counted, A. ii. 3. 36. See Rekene.

Rinde, s. rind, bark, T. iv. 1139; hard skin, T. ii. 642.

Ring, s. ring, 7. 131; T. ii. 585, iii. 885, 890; F 83, 143, 247; concourse, L. 1887; Ringes, pl. rings, C 908, E 255; lyk r., i.e. in ringlets, A 2165.

Ringe, v. make to resound, A 2431; ring, resound, T. ii. 233; pr. pl. A 2359; Rong, pt. s. rang, 5. 492; T. ii. 1615; C 662; Ronge, pt. pl. 3. 1164; Ronge, pp. rung, T. ii. 805, v. 1062. A.S. hringan.

Riot, s. riotous conduct, gaming, A 4395; Riót, gambling, A 4392.

Riote, v. riot, gamble, A 4414.

Riotous, adj. given to rioting, A 4408.

Risen, pp. of Ryse.

Risshe, s. rush, R. 1701; T. iii. 1161. A.S. risce.

Rist, pr. s. of Ryse.

Rit, pr. s. of Ryde.

Riveer (rivéér), s. river, B 1927; River, 5. 184; Rivére, T. iv. 413; Riveres, F 898; Ríverès, 9. 30; Rivéres, HF. 901.

Robbour, s. robber, B 3818.

Robes, pl. robes, A 296, 317.

Roche, s. rock, B 1. m 7. 9; B 5. m 1. 2; T. iii. 1497; HF. 1116; F 500; Roches, pl. B 5. p 5. 22; HF. 1035; 3. 156. F. roche.

Rode (rudə), s. complexion, A 3317, B 1917. A.S. rudu, redness.

Rode (róódə), s. nom. rood, cross, HF. 57; dat. HF. 2; 3. 924, 992.

Rode-beem, s. rood-beam, D 496. (A beam across the entrance to the choir of a church, supporting a rood or cross.)

Rody (rudi), adj. ruddy, R. 820; 3. 143, 905; B 2. m 3. 7; F 385, 394.

Roes, pl. of Roo.

Roggeth (ruggeth), pr. s. shaketh, shakes, L. 2708. Icel. rugga.

Rogh, adj. rough, G 861 n; see Rough.

Roghte; see Reeche.

Roialtee; see Royaltee.

Rok, rock; see Rokke.

Rokes (róókez), gen. pl. of rooks, HF. 1516.

Roket, s. rochet, tunic, R. 1240, 1242, 1243. An outer garment, usually of fine white linen. O.F. roquet, rochet.

Rokke, s. rock, L. 2195; 3. 164; F 1061; (written Rok before a vowel), F 1073; Rokkes, pl. T. ii. 1384; L. 2193; F 859, 993, 996, 1158, 1296, 1338.

Rokken, ger. to rock, A 4157.

Rolle, s. roll, C 911.

Rollen, ger. to roll, revolve, T. ii. 659; Rolleth, pr. s. rolls, turns over, revolves, T. v. 1313; A 2614, C 838; Rolled, pt. s. revolved, D 2217; Rolled, pp. much talked of, T. v. 1061; Rollinge, pres. pt. rolling, A 201.

Romaunce, s. romance, 3. 48 (see note); T. iii. 980; Rómaunce, T. ii. 100; Rómancès, pl. B 2038, 2087.

Rombled, pt. s. fumbled, moved about with his hands, groped about, G 1322. 'Rommelen (inquit Becanus) robustè et celeriter sursum deorsum, vltro citroque se mouere': Kilian's Du. Dict. (1777), p. 537.

Rombled, pt. s. buzzed, muttered, B 3725. See Rumble.

Romen (ròòmen), v. roam, wander, A 1099; v. refl. roam about, F 843; ger. B 558, F 896; Rome, v. HF. 2035; Rometh, pr. s. roams, L. 1497; Rome, pr. pl. B 1487; 1 pr. pl. E 118; Romed, 1 pt. s. roamed, HF. 140; L. 105 a; pt. s. A 1065, 1069; pt. pl. 3. 443; Romeden, pt. pl. F 1013; Rominge, pr. part. roaming, F 1173; Romingè, E 2218; Roming, T. ii. 555; L. 1470; Romed, pp. gone, L. 1589.

Rōn (ròòn), pt. s. rained, T. iii. 640, 677. A.S. rān, pt. s. rained; see reinin in Stratmann.

Rond, adj. round, circular, A. ii. 38. 1; Ronde, def. A. ii. 38. 3. See Round.

Rong, -e; see Ringe.

Ronges (rungez), pl. rungs, rounds of a ladder, A 3625. A.S. hrung.

Ronne, -n; see Renne.

Roo, s. roe, 5. 195; Roes, pl. roes, R. 1401; 3. 430; B 3. m 8. 6. A.S. .

Rood, pt. s. of Ryde.

Roof, s. roof, HF. 1948 (MSS. F., B. have the form roue = rove.)

Roof, pt. s. of Ryve.

Roon, s. rose-bush (see note), R. 1674. The vowel-sound, viz. open o (òò), presents a difficulty, as the Lowl. Sc. word seems to be (run), allied to Icel. runnr; but Halliwell gives roan, a clump of whins, as a Northumberland word, and this points to open long o. And further, we find the spelling ranes in the allit. Morte Arthure, 923 ('in ranes and in rosers'), which likewise points to the same sound.

Roos, pt. s. of Ryse.

Roost, s. roast meat, A 206.

Ropen, pp. reaped, L. 74. See note.

Rore, s. uproar, T. v. 45.

Rore, ger. to roar, T. iv. 373; v. HF. 1589; B 4078; Roreth, pr. s. T. iv. 241; resounds, A 2881; Roren, pr. pl. roar, B 3. m 2. 11; Rored. pt. s. L. 1219; Roringe, pres. pt. I 568.

Roring, s. loud lament, E 2364.

Rose, s. rose, R. 1700; T. i. 949; L. 112; C 33; gen. of the rose, A 1038; Roses, pl. R. 1651.

Rose-leef, s. rose-leaf, R. 905; Rose-leves, pl. L. 228.

Rose-garlond, s. garland of roses, HF. 135.

Rosen, adj. made of roses, R. 845; Rosene, adj. def. rosy, B 2. m 8. 4; pl. rosy, B 1. m 2. 16; B 2. m 3. 2, 7; B 3. m 1. 8.

Roser, s. rose-bush, R. 1651, 1659; I 858. F. rosier.

Rosë-reed, adj. red as a rose, G 254.

Roste, v. roast, A 383; Rosted, pp. A 147, 4137, D 1841.

Rosy, adj. T. iii. 1755, v. 278; Rosy hewed, of rosy hue, T. ii. 1198.

Rote (róótə), s. (1) root, A 2, 423, B 2320; L. 1368; principle, B 4. p 4. 179; the radix, the fundamental principle, G 1461; root, source, B 358, 1655, G 1069, 1301; root, i.e. foot, E 58; dat. L. 2613; F 153; on rote, firmly rooted, T. ii. 1378; herte rote, bottom of the heart, R. 1026, 1662; D 471; (2) root, the tabulated number written opposite a given fixed date, from which corresponding quantities for other dates can be calculated by addition or subtraction, A. ii. 44. 1; an astrological term for the 'epoch' of a nativity, B 314; Rotes, pl. 'roots,' epochs, A. ii. 44. 21; F 1276. Icel. rōt.

Rote (ròòtə), s. rote; byrote, by rote, by heart, A 327, B 1712, C 332. O.F. rote; see route in Stratmann.

Rote (ròòtə), s. a musical stringed instrument, a kind of fiddle, of Celtic origin; said to be a fiddle with three strings, A 236. O.F. rote, from O.H.G. hrotta, rotta, Low Lat. chrotta; of Celtic origin, from O. Irish crot (Gael, cruit, W. crwth); whence also E. crowd. In the Century Dictionary the old fiction is repeated, that it was perhaps 'played by a wheel, like a hurdy-gurdy.' It is clear that this notion arose from a popular etymology, viz. from Lat. rota, a wheel!

Rotelees, adj. rootless, T. iv. 770.

Roten, adj. rotten, 7. 314; A 3873, G 17, 228; corrupt, filthy, I 139, 419.

Roten-herted, adj. rotten-hearted, I 689.

Rotie, (rŏtiə), pr. s. subj. rot, render rotten, A 4407. A.S. rotian.

Rough, adj. rough, D 1622; Rogh, G 861 n. See Rowe.

Roughte; see Recche.

Rouketh, pr. s. cowers, crouches, is huddled up, A 1308. Cf. Icel. hrūga, a heap; hrūga, to pile up; Dan. ruge, to brood. See rūken, in Stratmann.

Roule, v. gad (lit. roll), D 653. Cf. F. rouler.

Roum, adj. roomy, spacious, A 4126; Rowm, large, wide, A. i. 2. 2. A.S. rūm.

Roum, s. room, space, L. 1999. A.S. rūm.

Roumer, adj. roomier, larger, A 4145.

Rouncy, s. a hackney, nag, A 390. O.F. roncin; cf. Span. rocin.

Round, adj. round; Rounde, pl. 9. 24; 12. 4. See Rond.

Rounde, adv. roundly, i.e. easily, with an easy (not jerky) motion, B 2076; Round (for Rounde before a vowel), round, A. 589; fully, melodiously, C 331.

Rounded, pt. s. stood out in a rounded form, A 263.

Roundel, s. roundel, roundelay, a kind of poem, 5. 675 (see note); A 1529; a small circle, HF. 791, 798; Roundels, pl. roundels, L. 423 (see note); F 948.

Roundnesse, s. roundness, B 5. p 4. 101; Roundnesses, pl. orbs, orbits, B 4. m 6. 33.

Roune, v. whisper, T. iv. 587; B 2025; ger. D 1572; Rouned, pt. s. HF. 2044; D 1021, 1550; Rowned, pt. s. F 216; Rouned, pp. HF. 722, 1030; Rouninge, pres. part. whispering, E 2130. See Rowne. A.S. rūnian.

Route, s. company, rout, troop, band, train, R. 627; 3. 360; 5. 245; 7. 34; B 2. p 5. 64; HF. 1703, 1771, 2119; T. iv. 403; A 622, 889, 2153, B 16, 1634, F 303, 382; number, R. 1667; flock, R. 909; Routes, pl. T. ii. 620. F. route.

Route (1), v. roar, T. iii. 743; murmur, HF. 1038; ger. to snore, 3. 172; Routeth, pr. s. snores, A 3647, 4167. A.S. hrūtan.

Route (2), v. assemble in a company, B 540. See Route, s.

Routhe, s. pity, ruth, compassion, mercy, 3. 592; 7. 337; T. ii. 349; L. 1034, 1861; C 261, F 1261, 1349; lamentation, L. 669; a pity, a sad thing, R. 192; 3. 1000, 1310; A 914. See Rewthe.

Routhelees, adj. ruthless, pitiless, T. ii. 346; B 863; Routheles, 7. 230. See Rewthelees.

Routing, s. snoring, A 4166, 4214; whizzing noise, HF. 1933.

Rove, dat. roof, HF. 1948 n.

Rowe, s. row, 3. 975; line, HF. 448; by r., in a row, T. ii. 970; Rowes, pl. rays, beams (of light), 4. 2. See Rewe.

Rowe, adv. roughly, angrily, T. i. 206; G 861. From A.S. rūh. See Rough.

Rowed, pp. rowed, T. i. 969.

Rowel-boon, see Rewel-boon; B 2068 n.

Roweres, s. pl. rowers, B 4. m 3. 16.

Rowm, adj. roomy, large, wide, A. i. 2. 2. See Roum.

Rowne, ger. to whisper, T. iii. 568; Rownen, v. G 894; Rowne, 2 pr. pl. whisper, D 241. See Roune.

Rowthe, s. ruth, pity, 3. 465; sorrow, 3. 97. See Rewthe, Routhe.

Royal, adj. royal, F 59; Royál, T. i. 432, 435, iv. 1667; A 1018; Royáles, pl. B 2038. See Real.

Royalliche, adv. royally, A 378; Royally, A 1713, E 955; with pomp, F 174.

Royaltee, s. royalty, E 928; Roialtee, B 418. See Realtee.

Royleth, pr. s. meanders, wanders, B 1. m 7. 7. O.F. roeler, to roll. See my note on P. Plowman, B. x. 297 (C. vi. 151).

Royne, s. roughness, R. 553. Cotgrave gives F. roigne, scurf, scabbiness.

Roynous, adj. rough, R. 988. See above.

Rubbe, v. rub out, 8. 6.

Rubee, s. ruby, HF. 1362. See Ruby.

Rubible, s. ribibe, rebeck, A 3331, 4396 n. See Ribible.

Rubifying, s. rubefaction, reddening, G 797.

Rubriche, s. rubric, D 346.

Ruby, s. ruby, 12. 4; T. ii. 585, iii. 1371, v. 549; L. 1119; B 1800; Rubee, HF. 1362; Rubies, pl. 4. 246, L. 534, 673; A 2147, 2164, B 3658; Rubyes, R. 1117.

Ruddok, s. redbreast, robin, 5. 349. A.S. rudduc.

Rude, adj. rough, harsh, R. 752; rough, poor, E 916; inhospitable, H 170; of humble birth, D 1172. See Rewde.

Rudeliche, adv. rudely, A 734; Rudely, roughly, E 380.

Rudenesse, s. boorishness, T. iv. 1677; rusticity, E 397.

Ruel-boon, for Rewel-boon, B 2068 n.

Rugged, adj. rugged, rough, A 2883 n.

Ruggy, adj. rough, A 2883. 'Ruggig, rugged, rough, shaggy'; Widegren, Swed. Dict.

Ruine; see Ruyne.

Rule, imp. pl. regulate, order, I 592; Ruled, pp. as adj. well-mannered, L. 163. See Reulen.

Rum, ram, ruf; nonsense words, to imitate alliteration (see note), I 43.

Rumbel, s. rumbling noise, A 1979; rumour, E 997.

Rumble, v.; Rumbleth, pr. s. moves to and fro with an indistinct murmuring noise, HF. 1026.

Rumblinge, s. noise, D 2133.

Rumour, s. T. v. 53; Rumours, pl. fame, plaudits, B 2. p 7. 81.

Rused, pt. s. roused herself, rushed away, 3. 381. See Rouse in my Etym. Dict.

Russhing, pres. pt. rushing, A 1641.

Ruste, ger. to rust, A 502; pr. s. subj. rust, A 500; Rusteth, pr. s. 16. 39.

Rusty, adj. rusty, A 618; besmirched as with rust, R. 159.

Rúyne, s. ruin, T. iv. 387; HF. 1974; Ruine, A 2463, B 2754.

Ryal, adj. royal, I. 144; L. 146a; Rial, 2. 59. See Real, Royal.

Ryde, v. ride, A 27, 94, 102; ride at anchor, L. 968; Ryden, ger. (with out), to go on expeditions, A 45; Ryde, ger. (with out), to ride abroad to inspect, B 1255 (see Outrydere); Rydestow, ridest thou, D 1386; Rit, pr. s. rides, T. ii. 1284, v. 60; L. 1776; A 974, G 608, H 79; Ryden, 2 pr. pl. A 780; Ryden, pr. pl. E 784; Ròòd, pt. s. rode, A 169, E 234, I 435; Rĭden, 1 pt. pl. (we) rode, A 825; pt. pl. C 968, D 2019; T. i. 473; Rĭden, pp. ridden, T. v. 68; B 1990; Rydinge, pres. pt. 7. 46; Ryding, G 623. A.S. rīdan.

Ryding, s. jousting, or riding in procession, A 4377.

Rym, s. rime (usually misspelt rhyme), 16. 37; 18. 80; B 2115, 2118, I 44; Ryme (for Rym, before a vowel), L. 66; Ryme, dat. 3. 54, 463, 1332, HF. 623; L. 102, 2516; a tale in verse, B 1899; Rym (for Ryme, before a vowel), verse, D 1127; Rymes, pl. T. iii. 90; B 96. A.S. rīm; cf. Icel. rīma, Swed. rim, Du. rijm, G. reim, F. rime, Ital., Span., Port. rima. The spelling rhyme is rare before A.D. 1600.

Ryme, v. describe in verse, put into rime (or rhyme), R. 31; HF. 1255; L. 570; A 1459, B 2122; ger. 5. 119; 16. 35; HF. 520; L. 996; T. ii. 10; G 1093; pr. pl. 16. 41.

Rymeyed, pp. rimed, or rhymed, F 711; see above. A.F. rimeier O.F. rimoier (Godefroy).

Ryming, s. riming, or rhyming, versemaking, B 2120; the art of riming, B 48.

Ryot, s. riotous living, C 465.

Ryotour, s. roysterer, lit. rioter, C 692; Ryotoures, pl. C 661.

Rype, adj. ripe, mature, B 2389, E 220; pl. seasonable, E 438.

Rys, s. spray, branch, twig, R. 1015; A 3324. A.S. hrīs.

Ryse, ger. to rise, A 33; to arise, get up, F 375; Rist, pr. s. rises, T. iv. 232; L. 887, 2208; A 3688, 4193, B 864; arises, T. i. 944; pr. s. refl. rises, T. ii. 812, iv. 1163; L. 810, 2680, 2687; Rysen, pr. pl. F 383; Ròòs, 1 pt. s. rose, 2. 17; pt. s. A 823, 2273, B 3717, 3863, F 267; L. 112, 1743; Risen, pp. 4. 2; A 1065; Riseth, imp. pl. I 161. A.S. rīsan.

Ryte, s. rite, A 1902, 2284; Rytes, pl. rites, T. v. 1849; observances, A. ii. 4. 37.

Ryve, ger. to pierce, T. v. 1560; v. thrust, L. 1793; pierce, C 828; tear, E 1236; Ròòf, pt. s. rove, rived, pierced, HF. 373; L. 661, 1351. Icel. rīfa.