Gosport tragedy, or, The perjured ship carpenter/The Scots Bonnet

THE SCOTS BONNET.

'TIS in vain to diſpute of a ſhoe or a boot,
The Muſes infpire my ſonnet,
My aim is to ſing of a much better thing,
And the thing that I mean is a bonnet, brave boys,
And the ſubject I chuſe is a bonnet.

I mean not to ſpeak in Latin or Greek,
Nor on Gælic, nor Irſh upon it,
Good people attend, I mean to commend,
And to be in the praiſe of a bonnet, brave boys,
And not in diſprute of a bonnet

The Spaniard in pride, with ſword by his ſide,
Like Quixote may ſwager and Don it;
The helmet and crown, tho' names of renown,
May rank with their equals a bonnet, brave boys,
May not bluſh to rank with a bonnet.

Say don't take me wrong, the theme of my ſong,
Iſn't that with flounces upon it,
which Ladies ſo fair, doth commonly wear,
I mean that the Scots wear a bonnet, brave boys,
Who ne'er was aſham'd of a bonnet.

This a bonnet of worth, tho' come from the North,
And worthy a much better ſonnet,
The bonnet I ſing, is fit for a King,
Nor care I who laugh at my bonnet, brave boys,
Nor value who banners my bonnet

Then don't take it ill, that I with my quill,
Have flouriſh'd encomiums upon it,
Since Turban & Turk have ne'er caus'd ſuch work,
As Donald has done with his oner, brave boys,
As Donald has done with his bonnet,

The hat may pretend with the cap to contend,
And Critics nay ſay much upon it,
But neither ſhall dare in the laſt to compare,
Or candidates fond with the bonnet, brave boys,
Or vie with your litters a bonnet.


This work was published before January 1, 1926, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.