Littell's Living Age/Volume 130/Issue 1677/Two French Hymns

TWO FRENCH HYMNS.
I.

(FROM THE FRENCH OF FRED. CHAVANNES.)
"Tu m'as aimé, seigneur, avant que la lumiere."

O Lord, thou lovèdst me, ere shone the light
Upon the worlds thy voice had called to be;
Ere yet the sun, rejoicing in his might,
Shed life in floods athwart their orbits bright;
My God, thou lovèdst me.

Thou lovèdst me, when hung the lifeless frame
Of Jesus Christ upon th' accursèd tree;
When to redeem me from th' eternal flame
Thy holy Son endured my sin and blame;
My God, thou lovèdst me.

Thou lovèdst me, when fires of love divine,
Lit in my heart by Thy good Spirit free;
Opened new heavens upon my soul to shine;
When peaceful fruits of righteousness were mine;
My God, thou lovèdst me.

And thou wilt love me, — whom thy love hath crowned
Nor sin, nor earth, nor hell shall pluck from thee;
Where sin abounded, grace doth more abound;
Only my love to thine be answering found,
O thou, who lovèdst me!


II.

((FROM THE FRENCH OF PIERRE CORNEILLE,
CALLED LE GRAND CORNEILLE.))

"O Dieu de vérité pour qui seul je soupire."

O God of truth, for whom alone I sigh,
Knit thou my heart by strong sweet cords to thee:
I tire of hearing; books my patience try.
Untired to thee I cry:
Thyself my all shalt be.

Speak thou alone! — For me nor human lore
Nor human sage shall now expound thy word;
Let creatures hold their peace, and thee adore;
Let voice of man no more,
But only thine, be heard!

Lord, be thou near, and cheer my lonely way,
With thy sweet peace my aching bosom fill;
Scatter my cares and fears; my griefs allay;
And be it mine each day
To love and please thee still.

My God! Thou nearest me; but clouds obscure
Ev'n yet thy perfect radiance, Truth divine!
O for the stainless skies, the splendors pure,
The joys that aye endure,
Where thine own glories shine!

Henry Downton.
Sunday Magazine.