London astrologer, or, A young girl put to the blush/The London Astrologer

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THE LONDON ASTROLOGER.

THERE was an old Aſtrologer,
in London he did dwell,
For telling girls their Fortunes,
all others did excel.

And many a pretty fair young maid,
to this old man would go,
All of them being willing,
their Fortunes for to know.

Amongſt the reſt, a pretty girl,
to this old man ſhe went,
All for to have her Fortune told,
it was her whole intent.

She aſked for the Cunning Man,
anſwer to her was made,
He is up ſtairs in his chamber,
go call him down ſhe ſaid.

When that ſhe ſaw the Cunning Man,
ſhe thus to him did ſay,
I have heard you can tell Fortunes,
come tell me mine I pray.

And if that you the ſame will do,
I'll pay you well, ſaid ſhe;
No fear of that, my Girl, he ſaid,
come walk up ſtairs with me.

I will not come up ſtairs with you,
nor any man indeed,
She ſpoke with as much modeſty,
as if ſhe'd been a maid.

Beſides I am in haſte, Sir,
and thought not to have ſtaid,
Come be as nimble as you can,
I'm but a ſervant maid.

Then he ſtood and viewed her,
his ſkill began to riſe,
He ſpoke ſuch words unto this maid,
which did her quite ſurpriſe.

It is true you are a ſervant,
but ſure you are no maid;
It is time that you were wed my girl,
you have the wanton play'd.

You would have laugh'd to've ſeen her bluſh,
hearing him what he ſaid,
But ſtill ſhe told for anſwer,
that yet ſhe was a maid.

Deny it not, my girl, he ſaid,
and tell me nothing ſo,
For you lay with your maſter,
not many nights ago.

Then ſhe began to curſe and ſwear,
ſhe would her maſter bring,
That he would teſtify for her,
that there was no ſuch thing.

Deny it not my Girl, he ſaid,
it makes your caſe look worſe,
For your maſter gave to you a crown,
you have it in your purſe.

When ſhe ſaw him ſo poſitive,
ſhe could it not deny,
She turn’d herſelf right round about,
to him made this reply;

Indeed I am a maiden yet,
and hopes ſo to remain,
My Maſter got my Maidenhead,
but he gave it me again.


This work was published before January 1, 1927, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.