Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management/Chapter LVII

SOUTH AFRICAN COOKERY
 
CHAPTER LVII
 

The food supply of South Africa varies considerably, according to locality. Corn, wines and fruit are cultivated in the neighbourhood of the Cape; up country the settlements are grazing farms. Much of the country is eminently suited for the cultivation of cereals, yielding two annual crops and producing some of the finest wheat in the world.

Meat Supply.—The supply of meat is plentiful. The Cape sheep is a peculiar breed, with a broad flat tail composed almost entirely of fat, which when melted often yields 5 or 6 lbs. This fat supplies the Cape housekeeper with a very good substitute for lard and frying oil. It also makes an excellent Savoury, when melted and spread on toast like marrow. "Biltong" is the provender of the Boers on the Veldt, and the most sustaining form of dried meat ever invented. The beef, or venison, is cut from the hind leg of the animal, from the thigh-bone down to the knee joint. After being salted and saltpetred, and pressed, it is dried in the sun, and may afterwards be kept for any length of time; for eating it is shredded with a pocket knife.

Game and Poultry.—Quails and many other birds are plentiful in South Africa, but partridges and pheasants are confined to the more northern regions. Deer are numerous, and are highly valued as food. The South African method of cooking venison in a baking pot, which no doubt was introduced by the old Dutch settlers, has much to recommend it. Fowls, ducks, turkeys, pigeons and hares are all abundant.

Fish.—The supply of fish is abundant in some parts and scarce in others. In addition to sole, turbot, salmon, mackerel, haddock and other fish known to us, there are varieties peculiar to the country; of these, the "silver fish" resembles whitebait, although larger, and is cooked in the same way. Cape Harders are almost identical with our herrings, while the Cape Creef may be described as crawfish. The Zulus look upon fish as a species of snake, and consequently impure, and unfitted for human food. Many South African colonists consider the iguana—a large kind of amphibious lizard a—very welcome addition to the bill of fare, and say that the flesh of this reptile is anything but unpalatable.

Fruit and Vegetables.—There is an abundance of fruit, while some vegetables are plentiful, others are very scarce. In addition to the varieties of fruit common in England, there are loquat, tamarinds, guava, medlar, quince and the Cape gooseberry.

Cooking in South Africa.—The instinct of good feeding is inherent in the Boer character, and the better-class Boer housewives are capital cooks. They are very fond of sweetmeats in every shape and form, and are exceedingly clever in making home-made preserves. " Mebos " is a very common and universally appreciated preparation of dried and salted apricots, while " honing kock " and " koe-sisters " are typical old Dutch sweetmeats. " Bobotee," " Sasatees or Kubobs," and " Gesmoorde Noender " all owe their origin to the same source, and should, as well as many other recipes not named, prove most useful.

Typical South African Dishes

3812.—ALMOND CAKE (See. An old Dutch Recipe.)

Ingredients.—1 lb. of Jordan or Valencia almonds, 1 oz. of bitter almonds, 1 lb. of castor sugar, 12 eggs, 4 heaped tablespoonfuls of pounded cracknel biscuits, rosewater.

Method.—Blanch and pound the almonds, adding from time to time a little rosewater to prevent them oiling. Beat the sugar and yolks of eggs together until smooth and light. Whisk the whites of add them alternately with spoonfuls of the prepared almonds to the yolks and sugar, stir in the powdered biscuits, and beat lightly until well mixed. Turn into a well-buttered cake tin, and bake gently from 1½ to 1¾ hours.

Time.—To bake, from 1½ to 1¾ hours. Average Cost, 2s. 6d. to 35. 6d. Sufficient for 1 large cake. Seasonable at any time.

3813.—BOBOTEE. (A Favourite Dish.)

Ingredients.—2 lbs. of meat finely chopped, 1 thick slice of bread, 2 medium-sized onions sliced, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of curry powder, 1 dessertspoonful of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of lemon juice or two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, 1 oz. of butter or fat, ½ a pint of milk, 8 almonds finely chopped, salt.

Method.—Soak the bread in the milk, drain away all that remains unabsorbcd, and beat out the lumps with a fork. Fry the onion in the butter or fat, add the curry powder, ½ a teaspoonful of salt, the sugar, almonds, lemon juice, meat, bread and 1 egg. Mix well and turn the whole into a buttered pie-dish or into little cups. Beat the remaining egg, add the milk strained off the bread (not less than a good ¼ of a pint), add a little salt and pepper, and pour over the mixture. Bake gently until the custard is set. When possible, juice obtained by soaking tamarinds in water should replace the lemon juice.

Time.—15 minutes when using cooked meat, otherwise about 40 minutes. Average Cost, 2s. 6d. to 2s. 10d. Sufficient for 6 or 8 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3814.—BREDEE (A Meat Stew.)

Ingredients.—2 lbs. of neck of mutton, 2 lbs. of tomatoes sliced, 2 medium-sized onions cut into dice, a small piece of red chilli finely shredded, sugar, salt and pepper to taste, 1½- ozs. of butter or fat.

Method.—Cut the meat into small pieces, discarding any superfluous fat. Heat the butter or fat, fry the onions until lightly browned, put in the meat, fry quickly for a few minutes, turning repeatedly. Add the tomatoes, chilli, salt and pepper to taste, barely cover with water, cover closely, and cook gently for 2 hours. Before serving add a little sugar.

Time.—About 2½- hours. Average Cost, 2s. 6d. to 2s. 9d. Sufficient for 4 or 5 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3815.—BROOD KHUTJES (BREAD DUMPLINGS). (An old-fashioned Dutch Recipe.)

Ingredients.—3 thick slices of white bread, 1 pint of broth (about), 1 tablespoonful of butter, i teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley, ¼ of a nutmeg grated, salt and pepper to taste, flour.

Method.—Soak the bread in the broth, squeeze it dry, and beat out the lumps with a fork. Heat the butter, put in the bread, mix well over the fire and season to taste. When cool, stir in the eggs, add the parsley and nutmeg, mix well and form into small balls. Roll lightly in flour, boil them in stock or broth for 2 minutes, and serve at once.

Time.—To cook, about 2 minutes. Average Cost, 5d. to 6d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3816.—CAPE GOOSEBERRY JAM.

Ingredients.—6 lbs. of gooseberries, 4 lbs. of preserving sugar, 1 pint of cold water.

Method.—Prick the berries with a darning needle, place them in alternate layers with the sugar in a preserving pan, add the water, and boil gently until a little of the syrup quickly jellies when poured on to a cold plate. Turn into pots, cover at once, and store in a dry place,

TimeFrom 1¾ to 2 hours. Average Cost, uncertain, Sufficient for 6 or 7 lbs, of jam, Seasonable when the gooseberries are ready.

3817.—CHEESE PUDDING

Ingredients.—½ a lb. of grated cheese, ½ an oz. of butter oiled, ¼ of a pint of cream or milk, 1 teaspoonful of made mustard, salt, cayenne pepper, 1 egg.

Method.—Beat the egg, add to it the mustard, cream or milk, butter, cheese, and a liberal seasoning of salt and cayenne, and mix well. Turn into a buttered dish, and bake gently from 20 to 25 minutes.

Time.—To bake, from 20 to 25 minutes. Average Cost, 9d. to 1s. Sufficient for 4 or 5 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3818.—CHICKEN MOULD. (A South African Luncheon Dish.)

Ingredients.—1 lb. of cooked chicken, 4 ozs. of ham or lean bacon, 2 ozs. of butter, ¼ of a pint of cream, 3 eggs, nutmeg, cayenne, salt, of a pint of Bechamel, oyster or other suitable sauce (see Sauces).

Method.—Melt the butter, beat the eggs until light, and mix the two together. Chop the chicken and ham finely, pound them well, adding a little of the mixed egg and butter to moisten. When smooth add the cream stiffly whipped, the remainder of the egg mixture, and season to taste. Turn into a well-buttered mould or basin, steam gently from 30 to 35 minutes, and serve with a little sauce poured round and the remainder in a sauceboat.

Time.—To cook, from 30 to 35 minutes. Average Cost, 53. 6d. to 6s. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3810.—DELICIOSA CAKES.

Ingredients.—4 ozs. of Jordan or Valencia almonds, 8 ozs. of castor sugar, 3 stale 1d. sponge cakes, the white of 3 eggs, of a teaspoonful of finely-grated orange rind, of a teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon, whipped cream, jam.

Method.—Pound or finely chop the almonds, and pass the sponge-cakes through a fine sieve. Mix the two together, add the orange rind and cinnamon, and stir in the whites of egg. Bake in well-buttered small patty pans for about 15 minutes, turn out, and when cold garnish with a small pyramid of cream with a little jam or preserved fruit in the centre of it.

Time.—To bake, from 10 to 15 minutes. Average Cost, 1s., in addition to cream and jam. Sufficient for 10 or 12 cakes. Seasonable at any time.

3820.—DUTCH KABOBS (SASATIES)

Ingredients.—1 small leg of mutton, 2 ozs. of butter, 2 ozs. of curry powder, 3 onions cut into dice, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, ½ a pint of milk, ¼ of a pint of vinegar (or the juice of 3 lemons), 6 lemon or orange leaves coarsely chopped.

Method.—Cut the meat into slices about ½ an inch thick, place them in an earthenware vessel, add the sugar, milk, vinegar or lemon juice, and the lemon or orange leaves. Fry the onions in the butter, sprinkle on the curry powder, and add the whole to the contents of the other vessel. Stir in a liberal seasoning of salt, leave it for at least 12 hours, and when wanted, place fat and lean pieces alternately on skewers, sprinkle with salt, and grill over the fire. The liquor in which the meat soaked should be strained, heated and served as gravy.

Time.—To grill the meat, about 20 minutes. Average Cost, 10d., exclusive of the meat. Sufficient for 12 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3821.—DUTCH KOCKIES (An old Recipe for Tea Cakes.)

Ingredients.—2 lbs. of fine flour, 1½ lbs. of good brown sugar, ½ a lb. of butter, ¼ of a lb. of sheep-tail fat, ½ a lb. of almonds pounded, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls of carbonate of soda, 2 teaspoonfuls of ground cloves, 2 teaspoonfuls of ground cinnamon, of a pint of claret.

Method.—Rub the butter and fat into the flour, add the sugar, almonds and spices. Dissolve the soda in a little warm water. Beat the eggs, add the dissolved soda and wine to them, mix with the flour and knead well. Roll out thinly, stamp into small rounds, and bake gently until crisp. The old Dutch people put a small piece of citron preserve in the centre of each cake.

Time.—To bake the cakes, about 20 minutes. Average Cost, 3s. to 33. 6d. Sufficient for 3 cakes. Seasonable at any time.

3822.—DUTCH WAFERS, OR WAFELS.

Ingredients.—½ a lb. of flour, ¼ of a lb. of sugar, 2 ozs. of butter, 4 eggs, 2 level teaspoonfuls of ground cinnamon, ¼ of a pint of wine.

Method.—Beat the butter and sugar together until creamy, beat the eggs in separately, adding a tablespoonful of flour between each one, and, lastly, stir in the cinnamon and wine. Cook over the fire in wellgreased waffle irons, and serve dredged with cinnamon and fine sugar.

Time.—To cook the wafers or waffles, about 8 minutes. Average Cost, is. to is. 3d. Sufficient for 1 lb. of wafers. Seasonable at any time.

3823.—FISH MOULD (An old Dutch Recipe.)

Ingredients.—½ a lb. of cooked fish coarsely-chopped, 1 good teacupful of breadcrumbs, 2 ozs. of butter melted, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of anchovy essence, cayenne, pepper, salt, white sauce, oyster, or other fish sauce.

Method.—Mix the fish, breadcrumbs, and a good seasoning of pepper, cayenne, and salt well together, and moisten with the eggs, butter, and anchovy essence. When well mixed, turn into a buttered mould; steam gently for about 1¼ hours, and serve with a little sauce poured round and the remainder in a sauceboat.

Time.—To cook, about 1¼ hours. Average Cost, 10d., exclusive of the sauce. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3824.—FISH STEW.

Ingredients.—A large sole, or any nice Cape fish, 1 oz. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, 1 medium-sized onion sliced, 2 tablespoonfuls of 1 small blade of mace, 2 cloves, salt, pepper, stock, egg and 1 crumbs, fat for frying.

Method.—Fillet the fish, trim neatly, chop the trimmings finely, and put them aside. Coat the fillets with egg and breadcrumbs, fry them until nicely browned, also fry the sliced onion, which should preferably be done in a separate frying-pan with very little fat. Place both fish and onion in a cooking vessel with a closely-fitting lid, barely cover with stock, add the ketchup, mace, cloves, and a good seasoning of salt and pepper, cover closely and cook for an hour. Knead the butter and flour smoothly together and add it to the contents of the stewpan in ½ an hour before serving. Season the chopped trimmings of the fish, moisten them with beaten egg, fry them lightly, and serve as a garnish to the fish.

Time.—1¾ hours. Average Cost, 2s. 6d. to 35. Sufficient for 3 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3825.—GESMOORDE HOENDER

Ingredients.—1 young fowl, 2 large white onions sliced, 1 green chilli shredded, 2 ozs. of butter, nutmeg, salt, pepper.

Method.—Divide the fowl into neat joints fry them lightly in the. butter, remove and keep them hot. Fry the onion until lightly browned, replace the fowl, add rather more than ¼ of a pint of water, a good pinch of nutmeg and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer gently for one hour, and a few minutes before serving stir in the chilli.

Time.—About 1½ hours. Average Cost, 3s. 6d. to 4s. Sufficient for 4 or 5 persons. Seasonable at any time

3826.—GRAPE JAM

Ingredients.—6 lbs. of grapes, 2 lbs. of cooking apples pared and sliced, 3 lbs. of preserving sugar, 2 pints of water.

Method.—Remove the grapes from the stalks and prick them with a darning needle. Boil the sugar and water to a syrup (see page 1125), put in the grapes and apples, and boil gently until a little of the syrup quickly jellies when poured on to a cold plate. Turn into pots, cover quickly, and store in a dry place.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 3s. Sufficient for 8 lbs. of jam. Seasonable when grapes are nearly ripe.

3827.—GREEN TOMATO PRESERVE.

Ingredients.—6 lbs. of green tomatoes, 8 lbs. of preserving sugar, 4 lemons, 2½ doz. peach leaves, 3 pieces of ginger, 3 tablespoonfuls of brandy.

Method.—Cover the tomatoes with water, put in the peach leaves, and boil very gently until the tomatoes are quite soft, but unbroken. Drain the water into another pan, add to it the sugar, and boil to a syrup (see page 1125). Strain, when cold replace in the pan, put in the thinly-pared lemon rind and ginger tied together in muslin, the lemon juice, and the tomatoes. Boil gently until a little of the syrup jellies quickly when poured on to a cold plate, then stir in the brandy. Turn into pot, cover at once, and store in a dry place.

Time.—Altogether, 6 or 7 hours. Average Cost, 6s. Sufficient for 12 lbs. of jam. Seasonable when tomatoes are green.

3828.—HONEYCOMB CREAM.

Ingredients.—1 quart of milk, 1 oz. of castor sugar, ½ an oz. of gelatine, 3 eggs, vanilla to taste.

Method.—Dissolve the gelatine in a little hot water. Beat the yolks of the eggs until light, and whisk the whites to a stiff froth. Boil the milk, stir in the sugar, add the yolks of eggs and dissolved gelatine, and boil up. Stir in the whites of eggs as lightly as possible, add vanilla to taste, and turn into a mould previously rinsed with cold water. Turn out when firm, and serve with boiled custard or compote of fruit.

Time.—About 20 minutes. Average Cost, 8d. or 9d. Sufficient for 1 large mould. Seasonable at any time.

3829.—HONING KOCK (HONEY CAKE)

Ingredients.—3 lbs. of flour, 1 lb. of sugar, 1½ pints of honey, 2 teaspoonfuls of ground cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful of ground cloves, ½ a wineglassful of brandy, i oz. of potash (bare weight), 1 teaspoonful of carbonate of soda.

Method.—Boil the honey and sugar together, stir in the cinnamon, cloves and potash, remove from the fire and add the brandy. Mix the flour and soda together in a basin, add the contents of the stewpan, and knead well. Roll out thinly, put into buttered tins, and bake in a slow oven for one hour. Cut into squares and keep in an air-tight tin. Candied citron peel, shredded, will be found an improvement.

Time.—To bake, about 1 hour. Average Cost, 3s. Sufficient for about 3 cakes. Seasonable at any time.

3830.—KOESISTERS (An old Recipe for a Dutch Sweetmeat.)

Ingredients.—3 breakfastcupfuls of flour, 1 breakfastcupful of moist brown sugar, ½ a breakfastcupful of oiled butter or fat, 1 good tablespoonful of yeast, 2 level teaspoonfuls of ground cinnamon, 1 level teaspoonful of mixed spices, 4 eggs, frying fat. For the syrup: 3 breakfastcupfuls of white sugar, 1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, 2 breakfastcupfuls of water.

Method.—Mix all the materials together, knead well, let the dough remain in a warm place for about an hour, then roll it out to about of an inch in thickness. Cut into i inch squares, and cook them in hot fat until crisp and nicely brown. Meanwhile boil the sugar, cinnamon, and water together (see page 1125), and dip the cakes into this prepared syrup. May be kept for months.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 3d. Sufficient for 2 to 2 lbs. of cakes. Seasonable at any time.

3831.—MACARONI PIE.

Ingredients.—¼ of a lb. of macaroni, ¼ of a lb. of grated cheese, 1 oz. of butter, 1 teaspoonful of made mustard, salt, pepper, paste Nos. 1652 or 1666, ⅓ pint of milk.

Method.—Break the macaroni into short lengths, throw them into rapidly-boiling salted water, cook until tender, and drain well. Replace in the stewpan, stir in the cheese, milk, butter and a good seasoning of salt and pepper. Turn the preparation into a pie-dish lined with paste, bake in a moderate oven for about 20 minutes, and serve hot.

Time.—About 1 hour. Average Cost, 5d. to 6d., exclusive of the paste. Sufficient for 2 or 3 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3832.—MUTTON CHOPS IN BATTER.

Ingredients.—6 or 8 small moderately-thin slices cut from a well-hung leg or loin of mutton, 1 egg, 3 tablespoonfuls of flour, a pint of milk, salt, pepper, nutmeg, frying fat.

Method.—Mix the egg, flour and milk to a smooth batter, and add a good seasoning of salt and pepper. Sprinkle each slice of meat with salt, pepper, and a little nutmeg, dip them into the batter, and fry gently in hot fat until crisp and nicely browned. Batter may also be made of the above quantities of flour and milk with the addition of about a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, the egg of course being omitted. A tablespoonful of oiled butter, fat, or salad oil will greatly improve the batter.

Time.—To fry the chops, from 10 to 15 minutes. Average Cost, 2s. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3833.—OBLETJES OR OUBLIÉS.

Ingredients.—1 lb. of fine white flour, ½ a lb. of castor sugar, 6 ozs. of butter, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of ground cinnamon, ¼ of a pint of wine, salt.

Method.—Beat the butter and sugar to a cream, add and beat in the yolks of eggs and the wine, and stir in as lightly as possible the stiffly-whisked whites of the eggs. Pass the flour, cinnamon, and a pinch of salt through a fine sieve, and add lightly to the other ingredients. Put about 1 tablespoonful of the batter into the oublie or wafer pan, over the surface of which it should spread easily, otherwise the batter must be thinned by adding more wine; cook quickly over the fire, remove, and roll while hot.

Time.—To cook each oublie, about 2 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. 9d. to 2s. Sufficient for about 2 lbs. Seasonable at any time.

3834.—PEACH PICKLE.

Ingredients.—2 lbs. of dried peaches, ½ a lb. of brown sugar, ½ a lb. of salt, 2 ozs. of curry powder, 6 large onions sliced, 6 chillies shredded, 6 large pieces of ginger, 1 tablespoonful of pepper, 1 tablespoonful of mustard seeds, 1 tablespoonful of coriander seeds, 3 quarts of vinegar, salad oil.

Method.—Pour the vinegar over the peaches and let them soak for at least 12 hours. Fry the sliced onions in salad oil until well browned and drain well. Pound or crush the spices. Boil all together until the peaches are quite soft but unbroken, then turn into jars or pots, cover closely, and store for use.

Time.—About 15 hours. Average Cost,—3s. 6d. to 43. Sufficient for about 5 quarts. Seasonable at any time.

3835.—PICKLED STEAK.

Ingredients.—2 lbs. of steak, 2 onions sliced, 2 or 3 tablespoonfuls of tarragon vinegar, 1 tablespoonful of salad oil, 24 white peppercorns, 6 cloves, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped mixed parsley, thyme and marjoram.

Method.—Place the steak in a deep dish, cover with slices of onions, add the rest of the ingredients, and let the steak remain in the marinade for about 12 hours. Drain and wipe well, and grill quickly over a clear fire. Strain the marinade into a stewpan, boil up, season to taste, put in the steak and let it cook very gently for about 20 minutes.

Time.—To grill the steak, 7 or 8 minutes. Average Cost, 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3836.—POFFERTJES (Dutch Fritters.)

Ingredients.—6 ozs. of flour, 4 ozs. of butler, 3 eggs, a pint of milk or water, about ½ a lb. of lard.

Method.—Boil the milk or water, then add the butter, stir the flour in gradually, and cook over the fire until it ceases to adhere to the stewpan or spoon. Turn on to a dish; when cool stir in the yolks of the eggs, beat stiffly, and add lightly the whites of the eggs. Heat the lard, put in the dough a teaspoonful at a time, fry gently until nicely browned, turning frequently meanwhile. Dredge liberally with fine sugar and serve hot.

Time.—To fry, about 15 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 3d. Sufficient for 8 or 9 persons. Seasonable at any time.

{{anchor+|r3837|P3837—SAVOURY RISSOLES. (Frickadels.) (An old Dutch Recipe.)

Ingredients.—½ a lb. of finely-chopped raw mutton, 2 tomatoes, 2 rather thick slices of stale bread, 1 very small onion finely chopped. 2 eggs, nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste, breadcrumbs, ¾ of a pint of curry sauce (No. 241), milk, fat for frying.

Method.—Soak the bread in milk, squeeze and drain away all that remains unabsorbed, and beat out the lumps with a fork. Pass the tomatoes through a fine sieve. Mix the meat, bread, tomato pulp and onion together, add nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste, and stir in 1 egg. Shape into small round cakes, coat with egg and breadcrumbs, and fry in hot fat until nicely browned. Have the curry sauce ready, put in the rissoles, stew very gently for an hour, and serve.

Time.—About 1 hours. Average Cost, about 1s. 3d. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3838.—SAVOURY RISSOLES. (Frickadels.) (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—½ a lb. of finely-chopped cooked mutton, 2 slices of bread, 1 small onion finely chopped, 2 eggs, breadcrumbs, salt, pepper, and nutmeg to taste, ¾ a lb. of mushrooms, 2 ozs. of butter, 1 mediumsized onion sliced, of a pint of brown sauce made from bones and trimmings of meat (see Sauces), milk, fat for frying.

Method.—Soak the bread in milk, squeeze and drain, and then beat out the lumps. Mix the meat, bread and finely-chopped onion together, season liberally, and stir in an egg. Form into small cakes, coat with egg and breadcrumbs, and fry in hot fat. Heat the butter, fry the sliced onion until lightly browned, put in the mushrooms, and when they have cooked gently for 20 minutes add the prepared brown sauce. Stir until boiling, put in the rissoles, let all stew gently for about an hour, and serve.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 1s. 6d. to 1s. 9d. Sufficient for 4 or 5 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3839.—SWARTZUIR (An old Cape Recipe.)

Ingredients.—2 or 3 lbs. of neck of mutton, 1 onion, 1 breakfastcupful of white flour, 2 ozs. of tamarinds, 1 pint of boiling water, 6 cloves, 1 teaspoonful of brown sugar, salt, pepper, 2 eggs.

Method.—Remove the meat from the bones and cut it into rather small pieces. Place it in a stewpan with the onion and 1 pint of cold water. To the pint of boiling water add the tamarinds, cloves, sugar, and a good seasoning of salt and pepper. Cook the meat gently for 1 hour, and then strain a breakfastcupful of the liquor into another stewpan, and to this add salt and pepper and the cupful of flour. Stir over the fire" until the dough is well cooked, and when cold work in the eggs and form into dumplings no larger than a walnut. To the meat add the tamarinds, water and spices, let it boil well, add the dumplings, and cook gently for 10 minutes longer.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable at any time.