Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management/Chapter XLII

RECIPES FOR MILK, BUTTER, CHEESE AND EGGS

 
CHAPTER XLII
 

Milk and Cream

2998.—CURDS AND WHEY.

Ingredients.—Milk, rennet.

Method.—Rennet varies so much in strength that no definite rules for its use can be given. It may be prepared from the lining of the paunch of a calf, but it is much better to buy it ready prepared. Heat the milk to about 80° Fahr., add rennet according to the printed directions on the bottle, and allow it to stand in a warm place until the curd separates itself from the whey.

2999.—DEVONSHIRE CREAM.

Method.—The milk should be allowed to stand for 12 hours in winter, and about half that length of time when the weather is warm. The milk-pan is then set on a stove, and should remain there until the milk is quite hot, but it must not boil, otherwise the albumen will coagulate and form a skin on the surface. The more slowly the milk is heated the better will be the result. The time required depends upon the size and shape of the vessel containing the milk, and the amount of heat applied, but small rings and undulations on the surface of the milk indicate that it is sufficiently scalded. When the process of scalding is completed, the vessel should at once be transferred to a cold place and kept there until the following day, when the cream is skimmed off into the tins or pots in which it is sold. In Devonshire nearly all the butter is made from scalded cream, and is usually very firm.

3000.—DEVONSHIRE JUNKET.

Ingredients.—1 pint of new milk, 1 dessertspoonful of brandy. 1 dessertspoonful of castor sugar, 1 teaspoonful of prepared rennet, whipped or clotted cream, ground cinnamon or grated nutmeg.

Method.—Heat the milk to about 80° Fahr. and stir in, off the fire, the sugar, brandy, and rennet. Pour this preparation into a deep dish, in which it will be served; put it aside until set, then cover the surface with either whipped or clotted cream, sprinkle on a little cinnamon or nutmeg, and serve.

Time.—2 hours. Average Cost, 9d. Sufficient for 1 dish.

3001.—MILK AND CREAM, TO KEEP IN HOT WEATHER.

Method.—In hot weather the milk, as soon as it is received, should be put into a double saucepan or a jug placed in a saucepan of boiling water, and heated nearly to boiling point. If the milk is allowed to boil, the albumen will coagulate and form a skin on the surface, which will prevent the cream being as completely skimmed off as it would otherwise be. Cream may be kept for 24 hours, if scalded without sugar, and by the addition of the latter ingredient it will remain good for at least 36 hours, provided that it is kept in a cool place. A little boracic acid also preserves cream and milk by neutralizing the lactic acid.

3002.—MILK AND CREAM, TO SEPARATE.

Method.—Nearly all large dairies are provided with steam separators, and smaller ones with separators worked by hand. In ordinary households, where these mechanical contrivances are not available, the milk should at once be poured into a large and very shallow basin. In 7 or 8 hours the greater part of the cream will have risen to the surface.

Milk is a perfect food, inasmuch as it contains in right proportions all the food substances necessary to sustain life, its constituents in 100 parts being: water 86.00; proteids, 5.00; fats, 4.00; carbohydrates, 4.30; salts, 0.70. It forms a valuable food for the young; and in sickness life can be sustained on milk alone for long periods. It also forms a valuable addition to the diet of adults in health, more especially when the indispensable solid part of their food is lacking in nourishing constituents.

Butter

3003.—ANCHOVY BUTTER. (Fr.—Beurre d'Anchois.)

Ingredients.—¼ of a lb. of butter, 3 anchovies or 1 teaspoonful of essence, cayenne.

Method.—Wash and bone the anchovies, pound them well in a mortar, and rub them through a fine hair sieve. Mix the paste thus obtained smoothly with the butter, add cayenne to taste, and use as required. When anchovy essence is used, it is simply mixed smoothly with the butter.

Time.—20 minutes. Average Cost, 4d. to 6d.

CHEESE.

 
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1—Gorgonzola. 2—Double Gloucester. 3—Koboko. 4—Parmesan. 5—Dutch. 6—Roquefort. 7—Schabzieger. 8—Dunragit. 9—York Cream. 10—Port du Salut. 11—Cheddar. 12—Pommel. 13—Camembert. 14—Mainzer. 15—Cheshire. 16—Stilton. 17—Cream Bondon. 18—Gruyere. 19—Wiltshire Loaf. 20—Cheddar Loaf.

3004.—BUTTER, TO CLARIFY.

Method.—Put the butter into a stewpan, heat it slowly, removing the scum as it rises, and when quite clear, pour it carefully into clean and dry jars, leaving the sediment behind.

3005.—CURLED BUTTER.

Method.—Tie a strong cloth by two of the corners to an iron hook in the wall. Tie the other end of the cloth into a knot, but so loosely that the index finger may be easily passed through it. Place the butter in the cloth, twist it lightly, thus forcing the butter through the knot in fine short rolls or curls. The butter may then be garnished with parsley and served. Butter for garnishing hams, etc., should be worked until sufficiently soft, and then used by means of a piece of stiff paper folded in the form of a cornet. The butter is squeezed in fine strings through the hole at the bottom of the cornet, and a little experience soon enables the worker to execute various designs.

3006.—FAIRY OR FEATHERY BUTTER.

Method.—Work the butter until it is sufficiently soft, then place it in a piece of coarse butter muslin or some loosely woven fabric through which it can be forced in fine particles, and which must be previously wetted with cold water. Draw the edges of the muslin together and the butter gently through, letting it fall lightly into the dish in which it will be served, or round any dish it is intended to garnish.

3007.—FRESH BUTTER, TO KEEP AND CHOOSE.

Method.—Fresh butter should be kept in a dark, cool and airy place, and in as large a mass as possible. Mould as much only as is required, as the greater the surface exposed the more risk there will be of it becoming rancid. Butter coolers of stoneware are very much used for keeping butter in warm weather. They are made with bell-shaped covers, into the top of which a little cold water should be poured, and in summer time very frequently changed. Failing one of these useful additions to the larder, the butter should be kept in a vessel surrounded with cold water, and covered with muslin kept constantly wet by immersing its edges in the water which fills the outer vessel.

In choosing fresh butter, see that it has a fresh, pleasant smell; if otherwise, it may be accepted as an indication that it has not been sufficiently washed from the buttermilk, and consequently will not keep. Butter should be quite dry; a considerable amount of water is sometimes left in it, so as not to decrease its weight, and thereby its keeping qualities are impaired.

3008.—LOBSTER BUTTER. (Fr.—Beurre de Homard.)

Ingredients.—Lobster coral, butter, cayenne, salt.

Method.—Dry the coral thoroughly, then pound it until smooth, adding cayenne and salt to taste, and a little butter gradually until the desired consistency is attained.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost, 6d. to 9d.

3009.—MONTPELIER BUTTER. (Fr.—Beurre Montpelier.)

Ingredients.—Watercress, fresh butter, pepper and salt.

Method.—Choose fresh young watercress, strip the leaves from the stalks, wash and dry them thoroughly, and chop them finely. Enclose the chopped cress in the corner of a clean cloth, dip it 2 or 3 times into cold water, then squeeze as dry as possible. Knead it into the butter, adding it by degrees until the butter is sufficiently green, then add salt and pepper to taste, and use as required.

Time.—20 minutes. Average Cost,—4d. to 6d.

3010.—MOULDED BUTTER.

Method.—Butter may be shaped without the aid of moulds, but round butter moulds or wooden stamps are much used and are made in a variety of patterns. They should be kept scrupulously clean, and before the butter is pressed in the moulds should be scalded, and afterwards well soaked in cold water. The butter at once takes the impress of the mould, and may therefore be turned out immediately into the butter dish. In hot weather a little ice should be placed either round or beneath the butter dish. Dishes with a double bottom are constructed for this purpose.

3011.—SALT BUTTER, TO PRESERVE AND TO CHOOSE.

Method.—In large families, where salt butter is purchased a tub at a time, the first thing to be done is to turn the whole of the butter out, and, with a clean knife, to scrape the outside; the tub should then be wiped with a clean cloth, and sprinkled all round with salt, the butter replaced, and the lid kept on to exclude the air. It is necessary to take these precautions, since a want of proper cleanliness in the dairymaid may cause the outside of the butter to become rancid; and if the scraping be neglected, the whole mass will soon become spoiled. To choose salt butter, plunge a knife into it, and if, when drawn out, the blade smells rancid or unpleasant, the butter is bad. The layers in tubs will vary greatly, the butter being made at different times;

so to try if the whole tub be good, the cask should be unhooped, and the butter tried between the staves.

Butter may be kept fresh for 10 or 12 days by a very simple process. Knead it well in cold water till the butter-milk is extracted; then put it in a glazed jar, invert this in another, putting into the latter a sufficient quantity of water to exclude the air. Renew the water every day.

Cheese.

3012.—CAYENNE CHEESE FINGERS.

Ingredients.—¼ of a lb. of finely-grated cheese, ¼ of a lb. of butter, ¼ of a lb. of flour, a saltspoonful of cayenne, a saltspoonful of salt, water.

Method.—Rub the butter into the flour, add the grated cheese, cayenne and salt, and mix these ingredients well together. Add sufficient cold water to mix the whole into a stiff paste, roll it out to about a ¼ of an inch in thickness, and cut the paste into fingers 3½ inches long and ¾ of an inch wide. Place them on a greased bakingsheet and bake in a moderately cool oven until crisp and lightly browned. Serve either hot or cold.

Time.—45 minutes. Average Cost, 7d. Sufficient for 10 persons.

3013.—CHEESE (Fr—Fromage.)

When a whole cheese is bought, and it is necessary to preserve some portion of it for a considerable time, it will be found a good plan to keep the cut surfaces of the cheese covered with well-buttered paper. The rind of the cheese should be left exposed to the air, and it should be turned frequently and its surface well rubbed first with a dry cloth and afterwards with melted fat or oil. To keep moist a piece of cheese that is in daily use, when it comes from the table wrap it at once in a damp cloth, preferably damped with beer, and keep it in a nearly airtight tin or other receptacle.

3014.—CHEESE, METHODS OF SERVING.

There are several methods of serving cheese. In large establishments, where 3 or 4 kinds are in daily use, it is a convenient plan to hand the butter and biscuits in a dual dish and ask what cheese will be eaten with them. Each piece of cheese should, of course, be arranged on a folded napkin, raised at the sides to conceal some of the lower portion of the cheese. When only one kind of cheese is in use, and the number to be served is considerable, the easiest and most economical method is to use dishes with three divisions, and fill one of them with small, square pieces of cheese, and the other two respectively with butter and biscuits. In small households it is more economical to place the cheese on the table in the piece, and cut off from it what is required.

3015.—CHEESE BISCUITS. (Fr.Biscuits de Fromage.)

Ingredients.—Finely-grated cheese, puff paste trimmings, 1 yolk of egg.

Method.—Roll the paste out thinly, sprinkle it liberally with grated cheese, and fold in three. Repeat the process twice, then cut it into rounds with a small cutter, brush them over with beaten yolk of egg, and bake in a moderately hot oven until crisp.

Time.—30 minutes. Average Cost, 5d. Sufficient, allow 2 to each person.

3016.—CHEESE BISCUITS. (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—3 oz. of grated cheese, 2 oz. of butter, 3 oz. of flour, 1 yolk of egg, cayenne, pepper and salt.

Method.—Rub the butter into the flour, add the cheese, season to taste, and mix into a stiff dough with the yolk of egg. Roll out the dough to rather less than a ¼ of an inch in thickness, stamp it into rounds or cut it into fingers, and bake in a quick oven until crisp. The biscuits will keep for a long time in a tin, and can be heated when wanted.

Time.—¾-hour. Average Cost, 5d. Sufficient, allow 2 to each person.

3017.—CHEESE FONDUE. (Fr.Fondue de Fromage.)

Ingredients.—3 oz. of finely-grated Parmesan or Cheshire cheese, 1 oz. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, 3 whites of eggs, 2 yolks of eggs, ¼ of a pint of milk, a pinch of salt, a small pinch of cayenne.

Method.—Melt the butter in a stewpan, mix in the flour, add the milk, and stir and simmer gently until smooth and thick. Add the cheese, salt and cayenne, and when well mixed pour the preparation on to the well-beaten yolks of eggs, stirring briskly meanwhile. Whip the whites of eggs to a stiff froth, and stir them lightly into the mixture. Have ready a well-buttered soufflé tin which the mixture should about half fill, pour it in and bake in a moderately hot oven for about 20 minutes. As the excellence of this dish depends on its lightness it should be served the moment it is ready. Overcooking will cause it to be tough, and standing after it is cooked will make it heavy.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost, 9d. Sufficient for 1 dish.

3018.—CHEESE FONDUE. (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—4 oz. of finely-grated cheese, 1 oz. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, 3 eggs, ¼ of a pint of milk, a good pinch of bicarbonate of potash, mustard, salt and pepper to taste.

Method.—The potash, which is added to assist in the decomposition of the coagulated casein in the cheese, should be dissolved in the milk. Melt the butter in a stewpan, add the flour, and when well mixed, pour in the milk, and stir until it boils. Simmer for 2 or 3 minutes, then add the cheese, mixed mustard, salt and pepper to taste, and stir until the cheese is quite melted. Let the mixture cool slightly, then stir in the well-beaten eggs, pour into a well-buttered fireproof dish, and bake in a moderately hot oven until set. Serve as quickly as possible.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost, 8d. to 10d. Sufficient for 1 dish.

3019.—CHEESE FONDUE. (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—1 teacupful of grated cheese, ½ a teacupful of fine breadcrumbs, 1 oz. of butter, 3 whites of eggs, 2 yolks of eggs, ¼ of a pint of milk, salt and pepper, cayenne to taste.

Method.—Heat the milk nearly to boiling point, add the butter, stir until melted, then pour the milk over the breadcrumbs. Cover, and let them stand for 10 minutes, then stir in the cheese, yolks of eggs, salt, cayenne and pepper to taste. Whip the whites of eggs to a stiff froth, stir them lightly into the mixture, turn it into a well-buttered soufflé tin or fireproof dish, and bake until set in a moderately hot oven. Serve as quickly as possible.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost, 9d. Sufficient for one dish.

3020.—CHEESE PATTIES. (Fr.—Bouchées au Fromage.)

Ingredients.—4 oz. of grated cheese, 1 oz. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, ½ a pint of milk, 4 eggs, salt and cayenne, a little puff paste.

Method.—Melt the butter in a stewpan, stir in the flour, add the milk, and boil for 3 or 4 minutes, stirring meanwhile. Let the mixture cool slightly, stir in the yolks of eggs, cook gently for 2 or 3 minutes, but do not allow it to boil. Add the cheese, season to taste, then stir in as lightly as possible the previously stiffly-whipped whites of eggs. Have ready some patty-pans lined with thinly rolled out puff paste, fill with the mixture, and bake in a quick oven.

Time.—20 minutes. Average Cost, 9d. to 10d. Sufficient for 9 persons.

3021.—CHEESE RAMAKINS. (Fr.—Ramequin de Fromage.)

Ingredients.—1 oz. of Parmesan cheese, 1 oz. of Cheshire cheese, 1 oz. of butter, ½ a tablespoonful of breadcrumbs, 1 egg, mace, salt and pepper to taste, milk.

Method.—Barely cover the breadcrumbs with boiling milk, let them stand covered for 10 minutes, then pound well in a mortar. Add the cheese, previously cut finely, the butter, the yolk of the egg, season to taste, and continue the pounding until a perfectly smooth mixture is obtained. Whip the white of egg to a stiff froth, stir it lightly into the mixture, pour it into well-buttered china or paper ramakin cases, and bake in a quick oven until set.

Time.—¼-hour. Average Cost, 6d. Sufficient for 6 persons.

3022.—CHEESE SANDWICHES.

Ingredients.—Thin slices of cheese, brown bread, butter.

Method.—Cut thin slices of bread from a brown loaf at least one day old, and spread them liberally with butter. Cover half the prepared slices with thin slices of cheese, cover with the remaining half, and cut into squares or triangles. Place them in a moderately hot oven on a buttered baking-sheet, and when both sides of the bread are crisp and brown, arrange the sandwiches neatly on a hot dish, and serve as quickly as possible.

Time.—20 minutes. Average Cost, 6d. Sufficient for 5 persons.

3023.—CHEESE STRAWS. (Fr.Pailles au Parmesan.)

Ingredients.—1 oz. of finely-grated cheese, 1 oz. of butter, 1 oz. of breadcrumbs, 1 oz. of flour, a good pinch of salt, a small pinch of cayenne, water.

Method.—Rub the butter into the flour, add the breadcrumbs, cheese, cayenne and salt, and just sufficient cold water to mix into a stiff paste. Roll the paste out to about a ¼ of an inch in thickness, cut it into strips about 3 inches long and ¼ inch wide, and place the strips on a greased baking-sheet. Bake in a moderately cool oven until crisp, and serve either hot or cold.

Time.—¼-hour. Average Cost, 4½d. Sufficient for 5 persons.

Note.—For other methods of making cheese straws, see chapter on Savouries.

3024.—CREAM CHEESE. (Fr.Crême de Fromage.)

Ingredients.—3 pints of double cream.

Method.—Tie the cream in a clean wet cloth, and hang it in a cool place for 6 or 7 days. At the end of this time put it into a mould, previously lined with butter muslin, and place it under slight pressure for 2 or 3 days, turning it 2 or 3 times daily.

3025.—MACARONI AND CHEESE. (Fr.Macaroni au Fromage.)

Ingredients.—¼ of a lb. of macaroni, 3 oz. of grated cheese, 1 oz. of butter, 2 yolks of eggs, ½ a pint of good gravy, 4 tablespoonfuls of cream, salt, cayenne and pepper.

Method.—Break the macaroni into short lengths, put them into the gravy when quite boiling, and simmer until tender. Strain, put the macaroni into a deep fireproof dish, and return the gravy to the stewpan. Add the well-beaten yolks of eggs, cream, salt, pepper and cayenne to taste, and stir until the mixture slightly thickens. Pour over the macaroni, sprinkle on the grated cheese, add the butter broken into small pieces, and brown with a salamander, or in a brisk oven.

Time.—1 hour. Average Cost, 10d. Sufficient for one dish.

3026.—MACARONI CHEESE. (Fr.Macaroni au Gratin.)

Ingredients.—4 oz. of macaroni, 3 oz. of grated cheese, 1 oz. of butter, ½ an oz. of flour, ½ a pint of milk, ½ a teaspoonful of made mustard, salt and pepper to taste, brown breadcrumbs.

Method.—Break the macaroni into small pieces, put them into slightly-salted rapidly-boiling water, boil until tender, and drain well. Melt the butter in a stewpan, stir in the flour, add the milk, and boil well, stirring continuously. Now add the macaroni, cheese, mustard, a liberal seasoning of salt and pepper, and mix all well together. Have ready a well-buttered fireproof dish, turn the mixture into it, sprinkle the surface with brown breadcrumbs and grated cheese, place a few small pieces of butter on the top, and bake in a quick oven until nicely browned. If preferred, the mixture may be cooked in scallop shells or ramakin cases.

Time.—¾-hour. Average Cost, 6d. Sufficient for one dish.

3027.—POTTED CHEESE.

Ingredients.—3 lbs. of Cheshire or Cheddar cheese, ½ a lb. of butter, ¼ of a pint of Chablis or Sauterne, ½ a teaspoonful of ground mace, a good pinch of cayenne pepper, clarified butter.

Method.—Remove the rind, cut the cheese into small pieces, pound it in a mortar until smooth, adding the ½ lb. of butter gradually. Season to taste, stir in the wine, press the preparation into small pots, and cover with clarified butter. Store in a cool, dry place.

Time.—1½ hours. Average Cost, 3s. 9d, to 4s. Sufficient for 9 pots.

3028.—STILTON CHEESE, TO SERVE.

Stilton cheese takes first rank as an English cheese. Those made in May or June are considered ready for use at Christmas, but they are not in prime condition until they have been kept for at least 12 months. Good old cheese that owes its flavour entirely to the full development of the constituents comprising it is undoubtedly the finest, but many prefer the stronger flavour imparted by adding daily small quantities of port, sherry, old ale or good stout, the liquor being poured in through holes in the top of the cheese. In serving a Stilton cheese the top of it should be cut off to form a lid, and a napkin or piece of white paper, with a frill at the top, pinned round. When the cheese goes from table, the lid should be replaced. Dishes of china or earthenware for Stilton and other cheeses keep the cheese in good condition and prevent waste.

3029.—TOASTED CHEESE.

Ingredients.—Cheese, butter, ale or stout, mustard, pepper, toast.

Method—To serve this dish in perfection either a chafing-dish or an old-fashioned cheese-toaster with an outer dish containing boiling water is needed. Cut the cheese into thin slices, place them in the cheese-toaster, spread on a little mustard, season them with pepper, and, unless the cheese be very rich, add the butter broken into small pieces. Pour over the whole 2 or 3 tablespoonfuls of ale or stout (milk may be substituted), stand the dish on a hot place or in a moderately hot oven, and cook until the cheese is melted. Serve at once in the hot-water dish, and hand crisp dry toast separately.

Time.—10 minutes. Average Cost, 3d. Sufficient for 1 person.

3030.—TOASTED CHEESE. (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—Cheshire or Cheddar cheese, bread, butter, mustard and pepper.

Method.—Cut the bread into slices about ½ an inch in thickness, toast them, trim off the crust, and cut each slice across into 4 squares. Cover each square with a thin slice of cheese toasted on one side, place them before a sharp fire or in a moderately hot oven, and serve as soon as sufficiently toasted.

3031.—TOASTED CHEESE, OR WELSH RAREBIT.

Ingredients.—½ a lb. of Cheshire or Cheddar cheese, 1 oz. of butter, 2 tablespoonfuls of either milk or ale, 1 teaspoonful of made mustard, hot buttered toast.

Method.—Melt the butter in a stewpan, add the cheese cut into small pieces, stir until melted, then add the milk or ale gradually, mustard and season to taste. Have ready some hot-buttered toast, pour the cheese preparation on to it, and serve as hot as possible.

Time.—15 minutes. Average Cost, 10d. Sufficient for 3 persons.

CHEESE AND EGG SAVORIES.

 
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1. Cheese d'Artois 2. Scrambled Eggs. 3. Cold Cheese Creams.

CHEESE AND EGGS.

 
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1. Cheese Straws. 2. Scotch Eggs. 3. Cheese Tartlets.

Eggs.

3032.—ALPINE EGGS. (Fr.Oeufs à la Suisse.)

Ingredients.—4 eggs, 6 oz. of cheese, 2 oz. of butter, a little finely-chopped parsley, pepper and salt.

Method.—Butter a fireproof baking-dish thickly, line it with the greater part of the cheese cut in thin slices, and break the eggs over this, keeping the yolks whole. Grate the remainder of the cheese or chop it finely, and mix with it the parsley. Season the eggs liberally with salt and pepper, sprinkle over them the grated cheese, and add the remainder of the butter broken into small pieces. Bake in a quick oven for 10 minutes and serve hot.

Time.—10 minutes to bake. Average Cost, 1s. Sufficient for 4 persons.

3033.—BAKED EGGS. (Fr.Oeufs au Four.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 2 oz. of finely-grated cheese, 2 oz. of breadcrumbs, ½ oz. of butter, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, salt, cayenne.

Method.—Butter 6 china or ramakin cases, put the seasoning into them, and break an egg into each. Put an equal portion of cheese into each cup, cover with breadcrumbs, and add a small piece of butter. Bake in a moderate oven for about 5 minutes, or until set, and serve hot.

Time.—5 minutes to bake. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 2d. Sufficient for 4 persons.

3034.—BAKED EGGS, COQUETTE STYLE. (Fr.Oeufs à la Coquette.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 2 oz. of finely chopped ham or tongue, 1 oz. of butter, 6 dessertspoonfuls of cream, nutmeg, cayenne pepper and salt.

Method.—Liberally butter 6 ramakin cases, divide the remainder of the butter into equal portions, and place one in each case. To each add a dessertspoonful of cream, a pinch of nutmeg and a little salt and pepper, and place them in the oven on a baking sheet. When the contents begin to simmer break and add the eggs carefully, place a pinch of cayenne in the centre of each yolk and replace in the oven. When sufficiently cooked sprinkle the chopped ham or tongue lightly on the white part of each egg, taking care to leave the yolk uncovered, and serve hot.

Time.—About 20 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. 8d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3035.—BOILED EGGS.

Method.—Eggs for boiling cannot be too fresh, but a longer time should be allowed for boiling a new-laid egg than one that is 3 or 4 days old. Have ready a saucepan of boiling water, put the eggs into it gently with a spoon, letting the spoon touch the bottom of the saucepan before it is withdrawn, to avoid cracking the shell. For those who like eggs lightly boiled, 3 to 3½ minutes will be found sufficient, 4 minutes' gentle boiling will lightly coagulate the white, and 5 minutes will set it firmly. Eggs for salads and sandwiches should be allowed to boil for 10 minutes. Cracking the shell and allowing the egg to remain in water until cold prevents a dark rim forming round the yolk.

Eggs.—When fresh eggs are dropped into a vessel full of boiling water they crack, because the eggs, being well filled, the shells give way to the expansion of the interior fluids, caused by the heat. If the volume of the hot water be small, the shells do not crack, since its temperature is reduced by the eggs before the interior dilation can take place. Stale eggs do not crack, the air inside being easily compressed.

3036.—BUTTERED EGGS. (Fr.Oeufs Brouillés au Beurre.)

Ingredients.—2 eggs, 1 oz. of butter, salt and pepper, buttered toast.

Method.—Melt the butter, but do not allow it to get hot. Break the eggs into a basin, add seasoning to taste, beat slightly, then pour into the stewpan containing the butter. Stir them briskly over a moderate heat until quite thick, then pour over the prepared toast, and serve at once.

Time.—5 minutes. Average Cost, 6d. Sufficient for 2 persons.

3037.—DUCKS' EGGS.

Ducks' eggs are more strongly flavoured than those of fowls, and when plainly boiled, are not generally liked. They may be used with advantage in all culinary preparations, 1 duck's egg being equal to 2 small hens' eggs.

3038.—EGG FRITTERS, MILANAISE STYLE. (Fr.Beignets d'Oeufs à la Milanaise.)

Ingredients.—4 hard-boiled eggs, ½ an oz. of butter, ½ an oz. of flour, ⅛ of a pint of milk, yolk of 1 egg, 1 oz. of finely chopped ham or tongue, 4 oz. of finely chopped chicken or veal, 1 teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley, 1 small shallot chopped and fried in butter, lemon-juice, salt, pepper, egg and breadcrumbs, frying fat and parsley.

Method.—Halve the eggs lengthwise, and remove the yolks, melt the butter in a stewpan, stir in the flour, add the milk, boil gently for 2 or 3 minutes, then put in the yolk of egg. Add the chopped ham and chicken or veal, parsley, shallot, yolks of the hard boiled eggs, a little lemon-juice and seasoning to taste. Fill the cavities of the whites of eggs with the preparation, coat carefully with egg and breadcrumbs, and fry in hot fat until nicely browned. Drain well and serve garnished with crisply fried parsley.

Time.—30 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. 3d. Sufficient for 5 persons.

3039.—EGG FRITTERS, ROYAL STYLE. (Fr.Beignets d'Oeufs à la Royale.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of cream, salt, pepper, frying batter (see No. 1645), frying fat.

Method.—Beat the eggs, add the cream, season to taste with salt and pepper, and pour the preparation into a well buttered plain mould. Steam gently until set, let it cool, then unmould and cut into strips about 2½ inches long and ½ an inch in thickness. Make the batter as directed, dip in the egg strips, and fry in hot fat until crisp and lightly browned. Drain well and serve.

Time.—To steam the custard, about 20 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. Sufficient for 7 or 8 persons.

3040.—EGG KROMESKIS. (Fr.Cromesquis d'Oeufs.)

Ingredients.—3 hard-boiled eggs, the yolks of 2 raw eggs, ⅛ of a pint of white sauce (No. 222), a level tablespoonful of chopped tongue or ham, a teaspoonful of finely chopped truffles, 5 thin pancakes (see Pancakes, Frying Batter), salt, pepper, frying fat.

Method.—Chop the eggs coarsely, add the sauce, yolks of raw eggs, tongue, truffle, seasoning to taste, and stir over the fire for a few minutes. Let the preparation cool, then divide it into pieces, the size and shape of a cork, and enfold in squares of pancake. Dip separately into frying batter, fry in hot fat until nicely browned, drain well, and serve.

Time.—40 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. 7d. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

3041.—EGGS Á LA COURTET. (Fr.Oeufs à la Courtet.)

Ingredients.—4 tomatoes, 2 tablespoonfuls of mayonnaise sauce, 1 gill of aspic jelly, 2 eggs, 1½ oz. of butter, salt and pepper, salad.

Method.—Cut the tomatoes in halves, and scoop out the centre. Have ready the eggs scrambled (as for Buttered Eggs), fill the tomatoes with the preparation, and set aside until quite cold. Coat them with cool aspic jelly, and when set, serve garnished with salad dressed with mayonnaise.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost, 1s. 3d. Sufficient for 4 persons.

3042.—EGGS À LA DREUX. (Fr. Ouefs à la Dreux.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, ¼ of a lb. of lean cooked ham, ½ an oz. of butter, 2 tablespoonfuls of cream, 1 dessertspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, 6 small rounds of buttered toast, cayenne, salt and pepper.

Method.—Chop the ham finely, and mix with it the parsley. Coat 6 deep patty-pans thickly with butter, and cover them completely with a thin layer of ham preparation. Break an egg into each pan, taking care to keep the yolk whole, sprinkle with a little cayenne pepper and salt, and add to each an equal portion of cream and a small piece of butter. Place the patty-pans in a deep baking-tin, surround them to half their depth with boiling water, and cook them in a moderate oven until the whites are set. Have ready the rounds of toast, cut to the size of the patty-pans, dish the eggs on them, and serve.

Time.—10 minutes to bake. Average Cost, 1s. 6d. to 1s. 8d. Sufficient for 6 persons.

3043.—EGGS À LA MAÎTRE D'HÔTEL.

Ingredients.—4 eggs, 2 oz. of butter, 1 dessertspoonful of flour, ¼ of a pint of milk, 1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley, 1 teaspoonful of lemon-juice, salt and pepper.

Method.—Melt 1 oz. of butter in a stewpan, stir in the flour, add the milk, and boil for 2 minutes. Have ready the eggs boiled hard, remove the shells, cut each egg into 4 or 8 pieces, and arrange them neatly on a dish. Season the sauce to taste, whisk in the remainder of the butter, adding it gradually in small pieces, stir in the parsley and lemon-juice, then pour the sauce over the eggs and serve.

Time.—20 minutes. Average Cost, 10d. Sufficient for 2 or 3 persons.

3044.—EGGS, COLBERT STYLE. (Fr.Oeufs à la Colbert.)

Ingredients.—6 new laid eggs, grated Parmesan or Gruyère cheese, salt, pepper, frying fat or oil.

Method.—Break each egg carefully into a cup, season liberally with salt and pepper. Sprinkle over half a teaspoonful of cheese, and drop carefully into hot fat or oil. Fry until they acquire a nice brown colour, turning frequently with a wooden spoon meanwhile, then drain well, sprinkle liberally with cheese and serve.

Time.—To fry, 5 or 6 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

3045.—EGGS, FLORENTINE STYLE. (Fr.Oeufs à la Florentine.)

Ingredients.—6 poached eggs, 6 pastry croustades, spinach purée, ⅓ of a pint of white sauce No. 222, 1 level dessertspoonful of grated Parmesan cheese.

Method.—Spread a thin layer of spinach purée at the bottom of each croûstade, put in an egg, and cover with sauce which must be previously mixed with the cheese and seasoned to taste. Make thoroughly hot and serve.

Time.—10 minutes, in addition to time spent in preparing eggs, croûstades and spinach. Average Cost, 1s. 5d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

3046.—EGGS IN BAKED POTATOES. (Fr.Oeufs à la Parmentier.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 3 large potatoes, 1 oz. of grated cheese, ½ an oz. of butter, ⅓ of a pint (about) of Béchamel or white sauce No. 178 or 222, breadcrumbs.

Method.—Wash and scrub the potatoes, bake them, cut them in halves, and scoop out the greater part of the inside. Poach the eggs and trim them neatly. Put a little sauce in each halved potato, and add an egg. Mix the remainder of the sauce with half the cheese, and spread it lightly over the eggs. Sprinkle first with breadcrumbs, then with cheese, add little bits of butter, brown the surface in a hot oven, and serve.

Time.—Altogether, 1½ to 1½ hours. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 3d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

3047.—EGGS, IN CASES (Fr.Oeufs en Caisses.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of grated Parmesan cheese, 2 tablespoonfuls of breadcrumbs (about), 2 tablespoonfuls of cream, 1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley, 1 finely chopped shallot, butter, salt, pepper, 6 china or paper ramakin cases.

Method.—Brush the inside of the ramakin cases over with clarified butter or oil, and place them on a baking-tin in the oven for a few minutes. Fry the shallot in a little butter, then drain and put it equally divided into the cases. To the breadcrumbs add half the cheese and parsley and a good seasoning of salt and pepper, and put an equal amount of the mixture into each case. Add very small piece of butter, carefully break and put in the eggs, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Pour a little cream over each egg, add the remainder of the cheese, bake in a moderate oven until set, then sprinkle with parsley and serve.

Time.—To bake, about 6 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. 3d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

3048.—EGGS, IN MAYONNAISE ASPIC. (Fr.Oeufs à la Courtet.)

Ingredients.—3 large tomatoes, 6 eggs, 1 oz. of butter, 2 tablespoonfuls of cream, salt, pepper, mayonnaise sauce, aspic jelly, salad.

Method.—Cut the tomatoes across in halves, squeeze out all the juice and remove some of the pulp. Beat the eggs, add the cream and seasoning to taste, pour the preparation into a stewpan containing the butter, and stir over the fire until it thickens. Let it cool, then fill the prepared tomatoes, piling the mixture somewhat high, and when quite cold coat first with mayonnaise sauce and afterwards with aspic jelly. Serve on a well dressed salad.

Time.—Altogether, about 1½ hours. Average Cost, 2s. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

3049.—EGGS, MORNAY STYLE. (Fr.Oeufs à la Mornay.)

Ingredients.—6 hard-boiled eggs, about 1 oz. of butter, 1½ oz. of grated cheese, ¼ of a pint of white sauce No. 222, nutmeg, salt, pepper.

Method.—Cut the eggs into thick slices, place them on a well buttered fireproof dish, and sprinkle them lightly with nutmeg and more liberally with salt and pepper. Add 1 oz. of cheese to the sauce, pour it over the eggs. Sprinkle thickly with cheese, and add a few tiny pieces of butter. Brown the surface in a hot oven, and serve.

Time.—To bake, about 5 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. Sufficient for 4 or 5 persons.

3050.—EGGS, PIÉMONTAISE STYLE. (Fr.Oeufs a la Piemontaise.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 4 oz. Carolina rice, 3 or 4 ripe but firm tomatoes, 2 tablespoonfuls of grated Parmesan cheese, 2 slices of bacon fried and cut into fine strips, black pepper, stock, salt, pepper.

Method.—Wash and drain the rice, cover it with stock and boil gently until soft and dry, adding more stock when necessary. Meanwhile squeeze the juice from the tomatoes and chop them finely. When the rice is ready add to it the tomatoes, bacon, cheese and a good seasoning of salt and pepper, and press into a flat mould, which afterwards invert on to a hot dish. Fry the eggs in clarified butter or oil, trim them neatly, and arrange them in a circle round the rice shape. Place a tiny pinch of black pepper in the centre of each yolk of egg, and serve.

Time.—About 1½ hours. Average Cost, 1s. 8d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

3051.—EGGS, POLONAISE STYLE. (Fr.Oeufs à la Polonaise.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of cream, 1 teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley, 1 teaspoonful of finely chopped chives, 1 teacupful of small dice of bread, clarified butter, salt, pepper.

Method.—Fry the dice of bread in clarified butter and drain well. Beat the eggs, add the cream, parsley, chives, fried bread and a good seasoning of salt and pepper, and pour the preparation into a stewpan containing about 2 tablespoonfuls of clarified butter. Stir over the fire until the mixture is thick enough to spread, then drop it in spoonfuls into hot clarified butter, fry, drain well and serve.

Time.—Altogether, about 15 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. 3d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

3052.—EGGS SUR LE PLAT.

Ingredients.—4 eggs, 1 oz. of butter, salt and pepper.

Method.—Spread a fireproof dish thickly with butter, break the eggs into it, taking care to keep the yolks whole, and season them lightly with salt and pepper. Put the remainder of the butter, cut into very small pieces, on the top of the eggs, and bake in a moderately hot oven until the whites become set, but not hard. Serve in the dish in which they were cooked.

Time.—10 minutes. Average Cost, 8d. Sufficient for 2 persons.

3053.—EGGS, TO CHOOSE.

The freshness of eggs may be tested in several ways. One ingenious apparatus is a speculum, furnished with an interior looking-glass, which renders the egg sufficiently transparent to show it is fresh, infected, or really bad. If fresh, a clear disk is thrown; if stale, a cloudy disk with spots; and if bad, a dark unsightly disk is visible. Another method of ascertaining their freshness is to hold them before a lighted candle or to the light. If the egg looks clear, it will be perfectly good; but if there is a black spot attached to the shell, it is worthless. The former test cannot be put into practice when purchasing eggs in the ordinary way, and the latter test can only be applied at night time when an artificial light is burning. To an experienced buyer the size, weight and appearance of eggs indicate their value, stale eggs being considerably lighter than those newly laid. Eggs that cannot be relied on should always be broken separately.

Eggs contain, for their bulk, a greater quantity of nutriment any other article of food. In 100 parts there are 73.50 parts of water, 13.50 of proteids, 11.60 of fats, and 1.40 of salts. It does not, however, follow that eggs are always suited to weak digestions; quite the contrary, for it is often a great object to give the stomach a large surface to work upon, a considerable volume of ingesta, over which the nutritive matter is diffused, and so exposed to the action of the gastric juice at many points; for there are many persons who cannot digest eggs, however cooked. The indigestibility of eggs decreases in proportion to the degree in which they are hardened by boiling.

3054.—EGGS, TO KEEP, FOR WINTER USE.

Method.—Procure the eggs warm from the nest, grease them thoroughly all over with butter, lard or oil, lay them in a box on a thick layer of bran, and surround each egg with a little bran, to prevent them touching each other. Cover each layer of eggs thickly with bran.

3055.—EGGS WITH BLACK BUTTER. (Fr.Oeufs frits au Beurre Noir.)

Ingredients.—4 eggs, 2 oz. of butter, anchovy paste, 1 dessertspoonful of tarragon vinegar, finely-chopped parsley, buttered toast.

Method.—Melt the butter in a sauté-pan or frying-pan, and fry the eggs, taking care to keep the yolks whole. Have ready some well-buttered toast cut into small rounds, spread them lightly with anchovy paste, then place the eggs on them. Re-heat the butter with the tarragon vinegar, cook it until dark brown, then pour it over the eggs and serve them garnished with fried parsley.

Time.—20 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. Sufficient for 2 or 3 persons.

3056.—EGGS WITH MUSHROOMS. (Fr.Oeufs aux Champignons.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 12 small mushrooms, 1 oz. of butter, 2 small onions, ½ a pint of good gravy, pepper and salt.

Method.—Boil the eggs hard, and when cold cut them into rather thin slices. Slice, and fry the mushrooms and onions in the butter, add the gravy, bring to the boil, and season to taste. Put in the sliced eggs, let them become thoroughly hot, then dish carefully, and serve.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost, 1s. 6d. Sufficient for 4 or 5 persons.

3057.—EGGS WITH WHITE SAUCE. (Fr.Oeufs à la Tripe.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, ½ a pint of good white sauce (see Sauces), a little finely-chopped parsley, 2 tablespoonfuls of cream.

Method.—Boil the eggs hard, let them remain in water until quite cold, then divide each one into slices or small sections. Make the sauce as directed, season it with salt and pepper, and add the cream. Arrange the prepared eggs in 6 china coquille cases, or failing these, in one dish, cover them with sauce, sprinkle lightly with parsley, then serve.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost, 1s. 4d. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

3058.—FRICASSÉE OF EGGS. (Fr.Fricassée d'Oeufs.)

Ingredients.—4 hard-boiled eggs, ½ a pint of white sauce (see Sauces), fried or toasted croûtons of bread, finely-chopped parsley, salt and pepper.

Method.—Boil the eggs hard, cut them into rather thick slices, and reserve the yolk of 1 for garnishing. Prepare the sauce as directed, season to taste, put in the sliced eggs, and let them become thoroughly hot. Arrange neatly on a hot dish, sprinkle with parsley, and yolk of egg previously passed through a fine sieve, garnish with the croûtons, then serve.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost, 10d. to 1s. Sufficient for 2 or 3 persons.

3059.—FRIED EGGS. (Fr.Oeufs Frits.)

Ingredients.—4 eggs, 2 oz. of butter or fat, toasted bread.

Method.—Heat the butter or fat in a fryingpan. Break the eggs into cups, slip them gently in the hot butter or fat, and fry until the whites are set. Whilst they are frying, draw the whites gently over the yolks with a spoon, and when set, baste them well with the butter or fat. Take the eggs up with a slice, drain well from fat, trim them neatly, and serve on slices of toast. If the eggs are to be served with ham or bacon, cook them in the fat obtained by frying the same.

Time.—10 minutes. Average Cost, 8d. Sufficient for 2 or 3 persons.

3060.—OVERTURNED EGGS.

Ingredients.—Eggs, breadcrumbs, butter, salt and pepper.

Method.—Butter some china ramakin cases or very small patty-pans thoroughly. Coat them rather thickly with breadcrumbs, into each one break an egg, and sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. Bake gently until set, then invert them carefully on to a hot dish, and serve.

3061.—OX EYES.

Ingredients.—Eggs, stale bread, sour cream, milk, butter.

Method.—Cut some slices of stale bread ¾ of an inch in thickness. Toast and stamp them into rounds 3 inches in diameter, then take out the middle of each round with a 1½ inch diameter cutter. Place the rings in a well-buttered dish, pour over them gradually as much sour cream as they will absorb without becoming sodden, then break 1 egg carefully into each ring. Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper, cover each egg with 1 teaspoonful of new milk, and bake gently until the whites are set, but not hard.

Time.—5 to 6 minutes.

3062.—PARMENTIER EGGS. (Fr.Oeufs à la Parmentier.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 3 large potatoes, 1 oz. of grated cheese, ½ an oz. of butter, 1 gill of white sauce, breadcrumbs, lemon-juice, salt and pepper.

Method.—Scrub the potatoes thoroughly, bake them until done, cut them in halves, scoop out the mealy inside, and put in a little sauce. Poach the eggs in salted water flavoured with lemon-juice, and place them carefully in the halved potatoes. Mix ½ the cheese with the remaining sauce, and sprinkle it lightly over the eggs. Sprinkle first with breadcrumbs, then with cheese, put small pieces of butter on the top, and brown in a moderately hot oven.

Time.—1 hour. Average Cost, 1s. 4d. Sufficient for 6 persons.

3063.—POACHED EGGS. (Fr.Oeufs pochés.)

Ingredients.—Eggs, buttered toast, salt, vinegar, or lemon-juice.

Method.—Eggs for poaching should be fresh, but not new-laid; for if poached before they have been laid 36 hours, the white is so milky that it is almost impossible to coagulate it. To prepare, boil some water in a shallow stewpan or deep fryingpan, add salt to taste, and allow to each pint of water 1 tablespoonful of vinegar, or 1 teaspoonful of lemon-juice. Break the egg into a cup, taking care to keep the yolk whole, and when the water boils, remove the pan to the side of the fire, and gently slip the egg into it. Tilt the pan, with a tablespoon gently fold the white of the egg over the yolk, so as to produce a plump appearance, and simmer gently until the white is set. Take it up carefully with a slice, trim the edges if necessary, and serve either on buttered toast, slices of ham or bacon, or spinach.

Time.—5 minutes to cook.

3064.—POACHED EGGS WITH SPINACH. (Fr.Oeufs pochés aux Épinards.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 1 pint of spinach purée, either fresh or tinned, 1 oz. of butter, 1 tablespoonful of brown sauce, 1 teaspoonful of lemon-juice or vinegar, nutmeg, salt, pepper, and sippets of toasted bread.

Method.—Prepare the spinach purée (see Chapter on Vegetables), place it in a saucepan, add the butter, a good pinch of nutmeg, salt, pepper and the brown sauce, and make thoroughly hot. Meanwhile poach the eggs and turn them neatly. Turn the spinach on to a hot dish, flatten the surface lightly; upon it place the eggs and garnish with sippets of toasted bread. Serve good gravy or brown sauce separately.

Time.—20 minutes after the purée is made. Average Cost, 1s. 4d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3065.—POACHED EGGS WITH TOMATO SAUCE. (Fr.Oeufs pochés à la Tomate.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, 4 oz. of rice, 1 oz. of butter, ¼ of a pint of tomato sauce (see No. 282, Sauces), about ½ a pint of stock, salt and pepper.

Method.—Wash and drain the rice, add it to the boiling stock, cook gently until all the stock has become absorbed, leaving the rice soft and dry, then stir in the butter and season to taste. Poach the eggs until firm and trim them neatly. Arrange the rice lightly on a hot dish, place the eggs upon it, and pour the hot sauce round and serve.

Time.—1¼ hours. Average Cost, 1s. 4d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable at any time.

3066.—PLOVERS' EGGS. (Fr.Oeufs de Pluviers.)

Plovers' eggs are served boiled hard. They are frequently used to garnish salads. The eggs are usually boiled from 15 to 20 minutes; and the albumen after boiling obtains a beautiful translucent bluish colour.

3067.—PLOVERS' EGGS IN ASPIC. (Fr.Oeufs de Pluviers en Aspic.)

Ingredients.—Hard boiled plovers' eggs, aspic jelly, salad, chili and truffle for decoration.

Method.—Set a little aspic jelly in the bottom of the dariols chosen, and decorate them tastefully with chili and fancifully cut truffle. Place 1 egg in each mould, fill up with aspic jelly, and put on ice or in a cold place until set. Unmould and serve garnished with salad.

Time.—1½ to 2 hours. Average Cost of eggs, 6d. each. Sufficient, allow 1 for each person. Seasonable August to October.

3068.—PLOVER'S EGGS ON CROÛTES. (Fr.Oeufs de Pluviers sur Croûtes.)

Ingredients.—Hard boiled plovers' eggs, brown bread, butter, salad, aspic jelly.

Method.—Cut some moderately thin slices of bread and butter, and stamp out some small rounds. Work about 2 oz. of butter until creamy, and put it into a paper cone. Place 1 egg on each round of bread and butter, and keep it in place by forcing some of the butter round the egg. Garnish with chopped aspic and salad. Variety may be introduced by using Montpelier or anchovy butter.

Time.—½-hour. Average Cost of eggs, 6d. each. Sufficient, allow 1 for each person.

3069.—SCOTCH EGGS. (Fr.Ouefs Écossaise.)

Ingredients.—3 hard-boiled eggs, ½ a lb. of sausage meat, 1 egg, breadcrumbs, frying-fat, 6 croûtes of fried bread.

Method.—Let the eggs become quite cold, remove the shells, and cover each one completely with sausage meat. Coat them carefully with beaten egg and breadcrumbs, and fry in hot fat until nicely browned. Cut each egg in half, dish them out side upwards on the croûtes of fried bread, besprinkled with chopped parsley, and serve either hot or cold.

Time.—¾-hour. Average Cost, 1s. Sufficient for 6 persons.

3070.—SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH GREEN PEA PURÉE. (Fr.Ouefs à la St. Germaine.)

Ingredients.—6 eggs, ⅓ of a pint of green pea purée, 1½ ozs. of butter, 1 tablespoonful of either white or brown sauce, 2 tablespoonfuls of milk, salt, pepper and chopped parsley.

Method.—Obtain the purée by passing cooked green peas through a fine sieve, place it in a stewpan, add ½ an oz. of butter, the sauce and seasoning to taste, and make thoroughly hot. Melt the remainder of the butter in another stewpan, add the eggs, previously beaten, seasoned to taste, and mixed with the milk, and stir over the fire until the mixture is sufficiently cooked. Place the green pea purée in six well-buttered ramakin cases, fill them with the egg mixture, sprinkle with parsley and serve.

Time.—About ½ an hour. Average Cost, 1s. 5d. Sufficient for 6 persons. Seasonable at any time.