Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management/Chapter XVIII

RECIPES FOR COOKING LAMB

 

CHAPTER XVIII

 

948.—BREAST OF LAMB, MILANAISE STYLE. (Fr.Poitrine d'Agneau à la Milanaise.)

Ingredients.—A breast of lamb, a mirepoix of vegetables (see "Shoulder of Lamb, Braised"), stock, 6 ozs. of macaroni, 1 tablespoonful of grated cheese, 1 or 2 tablespoonfuls of white sauce, ½ an oz. of butter, salt and pepper.

Method.—Prepare and cook the lamb as directed (see "Shoulder of Lamb, Braised"). Break the macaroni into 2-inch lengths, throw it into boiling salted water, boil rapidly for 10 minutes, then drain well. Replace in the stewpan, cover with hot stock, and cook gently until tender, keeping the stewpan uncovered in order that the unabsorbed stock may evaporate. Just before serving stir in the butter, cheese and white sauce, and season to taste. Arrange neatly in the centre of a hot dish, and place the meat on the top. Serve with a suitable sauce or thickened gravy.

Time.—Altogether, about 2 hours. Average Cost, 8d. to 10d. per lb. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons, according to size. Seasonable from April to October.

949.—BREAST OF LAMB, TURKISH STYLE. (Fr.Poitrine d'Agneau à la Turque.)

Ingredients.—A breast of lamb ¾ of a lb. of sausage-meat, ⅓ of a pint of demi-glace sauce or a mild curry sauce (see Sauces). For the mirepoix, or foundation: ¾ of a pint of stock, 2 onions, 2 carrots, ½ a small turnip, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 6 peppercorns, 2 ozs. of butter. For the rice border: 6 ozs. of Patna rice, 1 large onion, 1½ ozs. of butter, 1½ pints of white stock, salt and pepper, and, if liked, a pinch of saffron, may be added.

Method.—Remove the bones, flatten the meat with a cutlet-bat or rolling-pin, season well with salt and pepper, spread on the sausagemeat, roll up tightly, and bind securely with string. Slice the vegetables, and put them into a large stewpan with the butter, place the meat on the top, cover, and cook gently for about 20 minutes, then add the herbs, peppercorns, and stock to nearly cover the vegetables. Place a buttered paper over the meat, put on the lid, and braise for 2 hours. Heat 1½ ozs. of butter in a stewpan, add to it the onion finely-chopped, and fry for about 15 minutes without browning. Wash and blanch the rice, drain well, then add it, together with the stock, to the onions, season to taste, cover with a buttered paper and the lid, and simmer gently until the rice is tender and dry. Place the meat in a hot dish, pour the demi-glace or curry-sauce over, arrange the rice in the form of a border, and serve.

Time.—2½ hours, to cook the meat. Average Cost, 8d. to 10d. per lb. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

The Lamb as a Sacrifice.—Lambs were used in considerable numbers by the Hebrews in the sacrifices. Two lambs "of the first year" were appointed to be daily offered at the morning and evening sacrifice, and a lamb served as a substitute for the firstborn of unclean animals, as the ass, which could not be accepted as an offering to the Lord. On the anniversary of the Passover, one of the three great annual festivals of the Israelites, celebrated from the 14th to the 21st of the month Nisan, to commemorate the deliverance of the Hebrews from the bondage of Egypt, every family was ordered to sacrifice a lamb or kid, a male of the first year without blemish, and to sprinkle some of its blood with hyssop upon the two side posts and the lintel of the door of the house. The lamb was eaten roasted, with unleavened bread, and bitter herbs, and in haste, with the loins girded, shoes on the feet, and a staff in the hand; whatever remained over until the morning was burned. The sheep was also used in the numerous special, individual, and national sacrifices ordered by the Mosaic law. On extraordinary occasions vast numbers of sheep were sacrificed as an offering. Solomon, on the completion of the Temple, offered "sheep and oxen that could not be numbered for multitude."

950.—BREAST OF LAMB, STUFFED. (Fr.Poitrine d'Agneau Farcie.)

Ingredients.—A breast of lamb, mirepoix as in preceding recipe, ⅓ of a pint of brown or demi-glace sauce, veal forcemeat (see Forcemeats), French beans, 1 oz. of butter, salt and pepper, glaze.

Method.—Proceed as directed in the preceding recipe, substituting veal forcemeat for the sausage-meat. Cook the beans in salted water, and drain them well. Melt the butter in a stewpan, put in the beans, season with salt and pepper, toss over the fire for a few minutes and serve them arranged in small groups round the dish. Before serving, brush the meat over with glaze, and send the sauce to table in a sauce-boat.

Time.—2½ hours, to cook the meat. Average Cost, 8d. to 10d. per lb. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

951.—BLANQUETTE OF LAMB. (Fr.Blanquette d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—2 lb. of loin, neck or breast of lamb, 1 onion sliced, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 6 white peppercorns. For the sauce: ½ a pint of stock, 1½ ozs. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, 2 yolks of eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of cream, salt and pepper.

COLD COLLATION DISHES.

 
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1.—Pigeon Pie. 2.—Raised Game Pie. 3.—Cutlets and Peas. 4.—Prawns en Bouquet. 5.—Créme Chicken. 6.—Plovers' Eggs. 7.—Lamb Cutlets. 8.—Larks Farcie. 9.—Piped Ham. 10.—Boned Capon.

Method.—Cut the meat into pieces about 2 inches square, and put them into a stewpan with the onion, herbs, peppercorns and a little salt. Cover with cold water, and cook gently for 2 hours. Melt the butter, add the flour, stir, and cook for a few minutes without browning. When the meat is ready, strain from it ½ a pint of the liquor, and add it to the blended flour and butter. Stir until boiling, simmer for 3 or 4 minutes, then add the yolks of eggs and cream, previously beaten together. Stir and cook gently for a few minutes, taking care that it does not boil, or it may curdle. Arrange the meat neatly on a hot dish, strain the sauce over, and serve.

Time.—About 2¼ hours. Average Cost, from 8d. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable from April to October.

952.—CHARTREUSE À LA GASTRONOME.

Ingredients.—1 or 2 breasts of lamb, boned and braised (see "Shoulder of Lamb, Braised"), braised lettuce-stalks, ½ a pint of demi-glace sauce No. 242, stock, salt and pepper.

Method.—Braise the lamb as directed, and at the same time cook the lettuce-stalks. Cut the lamb into strips, arrange alternately with layers of lettuce in a plain cylindrical mould, adding a little good stock and a seasoning of salt and pepper. Cook gently for 1¼ hours in the bain-marie, then unmould carefully, and serve with a little of the sauce poured round, and the remainder sent to table in a sauce-boat.

Time.—About 1¼ hours after braising. Average Cost, 8d. to 10d. per lb. Sufficient for 1 large mould. Seasonable all the year.

953.—CHAUD-FROID OF LAMB CUTLETS. (Fr.Chaud-Froid de Côtelettes d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—The best end of a neck of lamb (braised as directed in No. 989), ½ a pint of aspic jelly (see jellies) 4 leaves of French gelatine, 1 gill of Béchamel sauce, ½ a gill of tomato sauce (see Sauces), ½ a gill of cream, salad, salt and pepper.

Method.—When the lamb is quite cold divide it into cutlets, and trim them into a neat uniform shape. Dissolve the gelatine in a tablespoonful of water, add it to the hot white sauce, add also lather more than ½ the aspic jelly, and divide the mixture into 2 equal portions. To the one add the cream, and to the other the tomato sauce, season to taste, and while hot pass the mixtures separately through a tammy-cloth. Coat half the cutlets with the white sauce and the remainder with the red. When the sauce is set pour over the cutlets the remainder of the aspic jelly, which must be nearly cold at the time. Dish in a circle, placing the colours alternately, and fill the centre with dressed salad.

Time.—About 1½ hours. Average Cost, 4s. Allow 9 or 10 cutlets for 7 or 8 persons.

954.—COLD LAMB CUTLETS. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau á la Gelée.)

There are various ways of preparing this dish. The cutlets may be cooked in butter (sautéed or grilled) or braised and pressed. The former method is no doubt more simple, although braising is highly recommended on account of the fine flavour imparted to the meat by this method of cooking. The cutlets must be carefully pared, trimmed and flattened before they are cooked, and when cooked they must be pressed beneath a heavy weight, and kept thus until they are quite cold. To finish them, proceed as follows:—

Pour a layer of aspic jelly in a sauté-pan, or large dish; when set arrange the cutlets in it, cover with another layer of aspic jelly, and let this also set. Place the pan or dish on the ice for about 1 hour, then cut the cutlets out with a sharp knife, and arrange them in a circle on a round dish. Fill the centre of the dish with some kind of cooked vegetables—peas, beans, asparagus points, or macedoine—previously seasoned with mayonnaise or French salad dressing, and garnish with neatly cut cubes of set aspic jelly, and serve.

Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Allow 9 or 10 cutlets for 6 or 7 persons.

955.—CROQUETTES OF LAMB. (Fr.Croquettes d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—½ a lb. of finely-chopped cooked lamb, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, ¼ of a teaspoonful of finely-chopped shallot or onion, ½ an oz. of butter, ¾ of an oz. of flour, ¼ of a pint of strong stock, salt and pepper, 1 egg, breadcrumbs, frying-fat.

Method—Melt the butter in a stewpan, fry the onion lightly, then stir in first the flour and afterwards the stock, and boil gently for 3 or 4 minutes, stirring briskly meanwhile. Add the meat, parsley, and a good seasoning of salt and pepper, stir over the fire until well mixed, and turn on to a plate to cool. Form into cork-shaped pieces, coat carefully with egg and breadcrumbs, and fry in hot fat. (See "Croquettes of Beef," also " Notes on Frying," p. 433.)

Time.—To fry, 4 to 5 minutes. Average Cost, 5d., exclusive of the meat. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable from April to October.

956.—CUTLETS, LARDED. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau Piquées.)

Ingredients.—2 or 3 lb. of neck of lamb, larding bacon, stock, 1 onion sliced, 2 carrots sliced, ½ a turnip sliced, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 6 peppercorns, salt and pepper, ½ a pint of tomato or brown sauce (see "Sauces"), glaze, mashed potato.

Method.—Trim the cutlets into a good shape (see "Lamb Cutlets, to prepare"), and lard one side closely with fine lardoons (see No. 989). Place the vegetables in a stewpan, lay the cutlets on the top, add the peppercorns, and stock to nearly cover the vegetables. Sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper, cover lightly with a greased paper, and put on the lid. Cook gently for 1 hour, basting frequently, and adding more stock as that in the stewpan boils away. Place the cutlets on a tin in a hot oven for a few minutes to crisp the bacon, brush them over with the reduced gravy, and arrange them neatly on a border of mashed potato. Serve the sauce separately.

Time.—About 1½ hours. Average Cost, 11d. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons. Seasonable, April to October.

957.—EPIGRAMS OF LAMB. (Fr.Epigrammes d'Agneau à la Soubise.)

Ingredients.—1 breast of lamb, 2 quarts of stock, 1 onion, 1 carrot, ½ a small turnip, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 1 egg, breadcrumbs, salt and pepper, frying-fat, Soubise sauce, Allemande sauce (see Sauces).

Method.—Trim the breast of lamb, cut it in two, and blanch it. Bring the stock to boiling point, put in the meat, boil rapidly for a few minutes, then add the vegetables cut into thick slices, the bouquet-garni, salt to taste, and cook gently for about 1 hour, or until the meat is tender. Remove the bones, press the meat between 2 dishes until cold, then trim off all the skin and gristle, and cut the meat into pieces convenient for serving. Have ready the Allemande sauce, which must be very thick and nearly cold; season the épigrammes, or lamb entrées, with salt and pepper, dip them into the sauce, and if not completely coated, repeat the operation. When the sauce is set and firm, dip the épigrammes into beaten egg, coat them carefully with fine breadcrumbs, and fry in hot fat until they acquire a golden-brown colour. Drain well, and arrange in the form of a circle on a hot dish, and serve the Soubise sauce in the centre.

Time.—3 hours. Average Cost, 8d. to 10d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

958.—LAMB BOILED. (Fr.Agneau bouilli.)

The leg of lamb is the part usually selected for boiling, but this method of cooking is not often adopted. Careful and frequent skimming is essential to preserve the colour of the meat, and the liquor in which it is cooked must contain nothing to destroy or overpower its delicate flavour. The peas, carrots, or whatever is served as a garnish, should be cooked separately, and the meat masked with a good white or Béchamel sauce.

959.—LAMBS' COLLOPS AND ASPARAGUS.

Ingredients.—Slices of underdone lamb, 30 asparagus, 1½ ozs. of butter, ½ an oz. of flour, For the seasoning: 1 tablespoonful of flour, ¼ of a teaspoonful of powdered mixed herbs, ¼ of a teaspoonful of salt, ⅛ of a teaspoonful of pepper, a pinch of finely-grated lemon-rind, ½ a pint of gravy, stock or water.

Method.—Cut the meat into fillets about 2½ inches in diameter, sprinkle both sides with seasoning, and put aside for 1 hour. Cut the tips of the asparagus about 2 inches long, and boil them in salted water until tender, the stems being put aside to be afterwards used for soup. Heat the butter in a frying-pan, cook the collops quickly until lightly browned on both sides, then remove and keep them hot. Sprinkle the flour on the bottom of the pan, cook until well-browned, and add the gravy or stock. Season to taste, boil rapidly for about 5 minutes, then strain. Arrange the collops in a close circle on a hot dish, place the asparagus tips in the centre, and pour the sauce round.

Time.—1½ hours. Average Cost, 2s. 6d. to 43. 6d. Sufficient, allow 1 lb. of meat for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable from March to July.

960.—LAMB CUTLETS, TO PREPARE.

Method.—Take the best end of a neck of lamb, remove the chine bone, and saw the rib bones across, reducing the length to 3½ or 4 inches, according to the size of the fillet, or lean portion of the meat. Trim off the greater part of the fat, and scrape the end of the bone, leaving about ¾ of an inch quite bare. A more even surface and a better shape may be obtained by flattening the cutlets with a wetted cutlet-bat or chopping-knife. The cutlets may be plainly grilled or fried, coated with egg and breadcrumbs, and fried or braised and glazed. The most suitable vegetable accompaniments are asparagus, green peas, and spinach; and an almost infinite number of sauces may be served with the cutlets, and allowed to give their name to the dish when it is a simple one. For example, plainly grilled or fried cutlets may be served with tomato or Madeira sauce, and termed respectively, Côtelettes d'Agneau à la Tomate, and Côtelettes d'Agneau à la Madère.

961.—LAMB CUTLETS, GRILLED. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau Grillées.)

Ingredients.—9 or 10 cutlets cut from the best end of the neck, ½ a pint of shelled peas, ¼ of a pint of good gravy or demi-glace sauce (see Sauces), salt and pepper, salad-oil.

Method.—Trim the cutlets into a good shape, brush over with salad-oil, then grill them over or in front of a clear fire for about 8 or 10 minutes, turning them 3 or 4 times. Season the cutlets lightly with salt and pepper, cover the end of each bone with a cutlet-frill, arrange neatly in a circle on a border of mashed potato, serve the peas in the centre and pour the hot sauce round.

Time.—30 minutes, altogether. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

962.—LAMB CUTLETS, MALMAISON STYLE. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau à la Malmaison.)

Ingredients.—9 or 10 cutlets cut from the best end of the neck, ⅓ of a pint of demi-glace sauce (see Sauces), 4 or 5 small stuffed tomatoes, (see Vegetables), lentil, green pea and potato purées, 1 egg, breadcrumbs, 2 ozs. of butter, salt and pepper.

Method.—Trim the cutlets into a good shape, season them with salt and pepper, and coat them with egg and breadcrumbs. Rub the cooked vegetables through a fine sieve, season to taste, bind with a little yolk of egg, press into small dariol moulds, and keep hot until required. Prepare and bake the tomatoes, also a border of mashed potato, which must be brushed over with yolk of egg and browned in the oven. Heat the butter in a sauté-pan, fry the cutlets until lightly browned, and drain well. Arrange them in a close circle on the potato border, garnish with the tomatoes and small timbales of vegetables, and serve the hot sauce in a sauce-boat.

Time.—To fry the cutlets, from 7 to 10 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

963.—LAMB CUTLETS, MILANESE STYLE. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau à la Milanaise.)

Ingredients.—8 or 9 lamb cutlets, ¼ of a pint of demi-glace sauce, ½ a lb. of Patna rice, ¾ of a pint of white stock, ¼ of a pint of tomato-pulp (made by rubbing raw tomatoes through a fine sieve), 2 ozs. of butter, 1 oz. of grated Parmesan cheese, ½ a teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, salad-oil, salt and pepper.

Method.—Wash and blanch the rice, and drain it well. Replace it in the stewpan, add the butter, tomato-pulp, salt and pepper, put in the stock, cover with a buttered paper and the stewpan-lid, and cook slowly for about 1 hour, or until the rice is tender and dry. Brush the cutlets over with salad oil, grill them over or in front of a clear fire for 8 or 10 minutes, turning them 3 or 4 times, and before serving season them with salt and pepper. Add the grated cheese to the rice, season to taste, and arrange it in the form of a pyramid in the centre of a hot dish. Sprinkle the top of it with parsley, dish the cutlets neatly overlapping each other round the base, and pour the hot demi-glace sauce round.

Time.—About 1 hour. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 7 or 8 persons.

964.—LAMB CUTLETS, RICHELIEU STYLE. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau à la Richelieu.)

Ingredients.—9 or 10 lamb cutlets, 2½ ozs. of butter, 6 or 7 small stuffed tomatoes (see Vegetables), 6 or 7 artichoke bottoms, ½ a pint of cooked asparagus-points, 1 truffle, ¼ of a pint of demi-glace sauce, salt and pepper.

Method.—When tinned artichoke bottoms are used, warm them in a little of their own liquor. Prepare and cook the asparagus-points, and, when ready to use, season and toss them over the fire in ½ an oz. of hot butter. Prepare and bake the tomatoes. Trim the cutlets into a good shape, heat 2 ozs. of butter in a sauté-pan, put in the cutlets, and fry them quickly until nicely browned. Place a cutlet-frill on each bone, arrange neatly in a circle on a border of mashed potato, and pile the tomatoes in the centre. Fill the artichoke bottoms with the asparagus points, sprinkle a little chopped truffle on each, and place them at regular intervals round the base of the dish. Have ready the hot demi-glace sauce, pour it round the dish, and serve.

Time.—To cook the cutlets, from 7 to 10 minutes. Average Cost, from 1s. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 7 or 8 persons.

965.—LAMB CUTLETS WITH CUCUMBER. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau au Concombre.)

Ingredients.—8 or 9 cutlets from the best end of the neck, or 6 or 7 chops from the loin, 1 large or 2 small cucumbers, 3 ozs. of butter, ¼ of a pint of gravy, 1 egg, breadcrumbs, salt and pepper, butter or clarified fat for frying the cutlets.

Method.—Peel the cucumber, remove the seeds, and cut it into ½ inch dice. Heat the butter in a stewpan, put in the cucumber, season well with salt and pepper, cover closely, and let it cook very gently in the butter for nearly ½ an hour, or until the pieces are tender but unbroken, then drain well. Trim the cutlets into a good shape, sprinkle both sides of them with salt and pepper, dip them in egg, crumb them, and then fry in hot butter or fat in a sauté- or frying-pan until lightly browned on both sides. Arrange the cutlets neatly on a thin potato border, serve the cucumber in the centre, and pour the hot sauce round.

Time.—To cook the cutlets, from 8 to 10 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

966.—LAMB CUTLETS AND SPINACH. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau aux Epinards.)

Ingredients.—8 or 10 cutlets, ¾ of a pint of spinach purée (see Vegetables) 1 oz. of butter, 1 egg, breadcrumbs, salt and pepper, ⅓ of a pint of gravy, tomato or any other sauce preferred.

Method.—Trim the cutlets (see "Lamb Cutlets, To Prepare"). Brush them over with beaten egg seasoned liberally with salt and pepper, and coat with breadcrumbs. Prepare the spinach purée as directed, and keep it hot until required. Heat the butter in a sauté- or frying-pan, fry the cutlets quickly until lightly browned on both sides, and drain them free from fat. Arrange in a close circle on a hot dish, pile the purée in the centre, and pour the sauce round.

Time.—To fry, 5 or 6 minutes. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable from April to October.

Note.—Peas, asparagus, beans or dressed potatoes may be substituted for the spinach.

967.—LAMB CUTLETS STEWED WITH TOMATOES. (Fr.Côtelettes d'Agneau, aux Tomates.)

Ingredients.—8 or 9 lamb cutlets, 4 tomatoes, 1 oz. of butter, 1 finely-chopped shallot or small onion, stock or water, salt and pepper.

Method.—Trim the cutlets (see "Lamb Cutlets, to Prepare"), and cut the tomatoes into thick slices. Heat the butter in a sauté-pan or shallow stewpan, fry the cutlets quickly until lightly browned on both sides, then add the shallot to blend, then add the tomatoes, and season with salt and pepper. Cover closely, and cook very slowly for 1½ hours, adding a very small quantity of stock or water from time to time, if necessary, but when the tomatoes are juicy none will be needed. When ready, remove the cutlets and keep them hot, pass the tomatoes through a fine sieve, season to taste, and if more sauce is liked add a little stock and thicken with cornflour. Arrange the cutlets in a close circle on a hot dish, pour the sauce round, and serve.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 11d. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons. Seasonable from April to October.

968.—LAMB, FRICASSÉE OF. (Fr.Fricassée d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—A breast of lamb, 2 ozs. of butter, 1 small onion, 2 bay-leaves, 2 cloves, 1 blade of mace, 6 peppercorns, 1 pint of boiling stock or water, 1 oz. of flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of capers coarsely-chopped, salt and pepper.

Method.—Trim the meat, and cut into 2-inch squares. Heat the butter in a stewpan, put in the onion sliced, bay-leaves, cloves, mace, peppercorns, ½ a saltspoonful of pepper, salt and the meat, cover, and cook very gently for ½ an hour, stirring occasionally. Now add the boiling stock or water and salt to taste, and simmer gently for 1 hour longer, 20 minutes before serving, mix the flour smoothly with a very small quantity of cold water, and add to it gradually about ½ pint of the liquor from the stewpan, stirring all the time. Bring the contents of the stewpan to boiling point, pour in the thickened liquor, boil for 2 or 3 minutes, then simmer until the meat is sufficiently cooked. When ready, arrange the pieces of meat inside a border of mashed potato, or otherwise, as may be preferred, season the sauce, add to it the capers to taste, and pour over the meat.

Time.—About 1½ hours. Average Cost, 10d. per lb. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

969.—LAMB'S FRY. (Fr.Fricot d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—1½ lb. of fry. For the batter: 1 level dessertspoonful of flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of water, 1 egg, salt and pepper, 2 or 3 ozs. of clarified fat or dripping, 1 tablespoonful of flour, about ½ a pint of hot water.

Method.—Wash the fry, put it into a stewpan with sufficient cold water to just cover it, bring to the boil, cook for 2 or 3 minutes, then drain and dry well. Mix the flour, 1 saltspoonful of salt, and ½ the quantity of pepper into a smooth batter with the 2 tablespoonfuls of cold water, and add to it the egg, previously beaten. Heat the clarified fat in a frying-pan; dip the pieces of fry in the batter, and fry them gently until nicely browned on both sides, but take care not to overcook the liver. Have ready a very hot dish on which to put the fry, and keep it as hot as possible while the gravy is being made. The fat in the pan may be used for this purpose, or, if preferred, it can be poured away, and 1 oz. of butter used instead. Stir the flour into the fat, and when brown pour in the hot water, stir and boil for five minutes, season to taste, and either strain it round the dish or serve it separately in a sauce-boat.

Time.—To cook, about 15 or 20 minutes. Average Cost, 10d. to 1s. per lb. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

Note.—If preferred, the fry may be coated with egg and breadcrumbs, instead of the batter, before frying.

970.—LAMB'S FRY. (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—1½ lb. of fry, a few thin slices of bacon, 3 ozs. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of cooked macaroni or spaghetti (small sized macaroni), 1 teaspoonful of lemon-juice, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, 1 egg, breadcrumbs, salt and pepper, 1 small onion, 1 small carrot, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf).

Method.—Wash the fry, put it into a stewpan with the onion and carrot cut into thin slices, the bouquet-garni and cold water to cover, bring gently to the boil, and simmer slowly for about 1 hour. Turn both meat and gravy into a basin, and, when cold, strain off the gravy and divide the meat into 2 portions. Cut one half into rather thin slices, season them with salt and pepper, coat them with egg and breadcrumbs, and put the slices aside until wanted. Cut the remainder of the meat into small dice, and also cut the macaroni or spaghetti into very small pieces. Melt 1 oz. of butter in a stewpan, add the flour, cook and stir for 3 or 4 minutes, pour in the strained liquor, and stir until boiling. Season to taste, put in the meat, macaroni and parsley, cover, and let the stewpan stand where the contents will keep hot without boiling. Divide the bacon into small pieces, roll them, put them on a skewer, and grill or bake them in the oven until crisp. Heat the remaining 2 ozs. of butter in a sauté- or frying-pan, put in the prepared slices of fry, and cook them quickly until both sides are lightly browned, then drain well. The preparation in the stewpan should have a consistency sufficient to allow it to be piled in the centre of a dish. Serve the fried slices of fry round the base, and garnish with the bacon. When a more liquid sauce is preferred, dish the slices of fry on a potato border, and serve the sauce in the centre.

Time.—1½ to 2 hours. Average Cost, 10d. to 1s. per lb. Sufficient for about 4 persons.

971.—LAMB'S HEAD AND PLUCK. (Fr.Tête d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—A lamb's head and pluck (which consists of the heart, liver, and lungs or lights), 2 ozs. of butter, 1½ ozs. of flour, 1 large onion, 1 carrot, ½ a small turnip, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 6 peppercorns, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, salt and pepper, 1 egg, browned breadcrumbs.

Method.—Wash the head well, put it into a stewpan, cover it with cold water, and bring to the boil, strain, scrape off the hairs, if any, and rinse well. Wash the pluck in cold water, and put it into the stewpan with the head, cover with cold water, and when boiling skim well. When all the scum has been removed, put in the sliced vegetables, the bouquet-garni, peppercorns and ½ a teaspoonful of salt, and simmer gently for about 1 hour. Divide the head, take out the tongue and brains, and keep the head hot over a saucepan of boiling water. Skin the tongue, cut it into dice, chop the brains coarsely, and cut the pluck into small pieces. Meanwhile, the liquor in the pan must have been allowed to boil rapidly to reduce, and before using it for the sauce it must be strained and well skimmed. Melt the butter in a stewpan, add the flour, and cook for five minutes. Pour in 1¼ pints of the liquor, and stir until it boils, then put in the pluck, tongue and brains, add the parsley, and season to taste, cover closely, re-heat, and keep hot until required. Coat the head with beaten egg and browned breadcrumbs, bake it in a moderate oven for 10 to 15 minutes, basting frequently with hot fat, then drain well. Place the head in the centre of a hot dish, pour the mince round, and serve.

Time.—From 1¾ to 2 hours. Average Cost, from 2s. to 2s. 6d. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

972.—LAMB PIE. (Fr.Pâté d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—2 lb. of loin, neck, or breast of lamb, 1 or 2 lambs' or sheep's kidneys thinly-sliced, stock or water, salt and pepper, short crust or puff-paste.

Method.—Free the meat from fat and bones, and boil the latter down for gravy. Cut the meat into pieces convenient for serving, place them in a piedish, sprinkling each layer with salt and pepper, and add a few slices of kidney. Half fill the dish with stock or water, cover with paste (see "Veal Pie"), and bake in a moderate oven for about 1½ hours. Strain and season the stock made from the bones, and pour it into the pie just before serving.

Time.—About 1½ hours. Average Cost, 2s. 6d. to 3s. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable from April to October.

973.—LAMB, STEWED. (Fr.Ragoût d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—3 or 4 lb. of loin, neck or breast of lamb, 2 ozs. of butter, the juice of ½ a lemon, 6 mint leaves, ¼ of a teaspoonful of pepper, ½ a pint of Soubise sauce (see Sauces).

Method.—Saw the long bones across, and either skewer or bind the meat into a compact form. Heat the butter in a large stewpan, add the pepper, mint, and lemon-juice, put in the meat, cover closely, and cook very gently for about an hour, turning the meat 2 or 3 times, in order to brown the entire surface. Serve the Soubise sauce separately; or, instead of this sauce, add ¼ of a pint of stock mixed with 1 dessertspoonful of flour to the butter, etc., in the stewpan, boil for 2 or 3 minutes, season to taste, improve the colour if necessary by adding a few drops of liquid caramel. Dish up and serve hot.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 10d. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 7 or 8 persons.

974.—LAMB, STEWED. (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—2 or 3 lb. of loin, neck or breast of lamb, 2 ozs. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, 1 small onion, 1 small carrot, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 6 peppercorns, a sprig of mint, 1 pint of shelled peas, salt and pepper, stock.

Method.—Trim the meat and cut it into pieces convenient for serving. Heat the butter in a stewpan, put in the vegetables (cut into dice), herbs, peppercorns, and mint (tied in muslin), and the meat, cover closely, and cook gently for about 30 minutes, turning the meat 2 or 3 times. When lightly browned, add boiling stock or water to cover the meat, put on the lid, and simmer very gently for about an hour. ½ an hour before serving, boil up and put in the peas a few at a time, so that the temperature is not much reduced below boiling point. About 15 minutes before serving mix the flour smoothly with a very small quantity of cold water, then add to it gradually about ½ a pint of the strained liquor from the stewpan, stirring all the time. Pour the thickened liquor back into the stewpan, and stir gently for a few minutes. When both meat and peas are tender, remove the herbs, season to taste, and serve the stew in a deep dish.

Time.—2 to 2½ hours. Average Cost, 10d. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

975.—LAMBS' SWEETBREADS IN CASES. (Fr.Ris d'Agneau en Caisses.)

Ingredients.—1½ lb. of lambs' sweetbreads, ½ a pint of Béchamel sauce (see "Sauces ), stock, cooked green peas, or a few tablespoonfuls of spinach purée, a little finely-chopped truffle, salt and pepper.

Method.—Soak and blanch the sweetbreads (see recipes for dressing veal sweetbreads), then drain well and cover with well-flavoured white stock. Cook gently for 1 hour, or until tender, and drain from the stock. Make the sauce as directed, and season to taste. Place a layer of peas or spinach purée at the bottom of 8 or 9 oval china cases, add a portion of sweetbread and a little sauce. Sprinkle lightly with truffle, and serve hot.

Time.—About 1¼ hours. Average Cost, 1s. 9d. to 2s. 3d per lb. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable, all the year.

976.—LAMB SWEETBREADS, BOURGEOISE STYLE. (Fr.Ris d'Agneau à la Bourgeoise.)

Ingredients.—1½ lb. of lambs' sweetbreads, ½ a pint of brown sauce, stock, 1 oz. of butter, 1 tablespoonfuls of cooked peas, 2 tablespoonfuls of cooked carrot, 2 tablespoonfuls of cooked turnip, salt and pepper.

Method.—Soak and blanch the sweetbreads (see recipes for dressing sweetbreads), and drain and dry them well. Melt the butter in a stewpan, toss the sweetbreads in it until lightly cooked, then barely cover them with good stock. Season to taste, cook very gently for 1 hour, and drain and dry thoroughly. Make the sauce as directed (see No. 233), season to taste, and keep hot until required. Meanwhile boil the turnip, carrot (cut into rounds rather smaller than a marble), and the peas separately until tender, but not broken, and add them in to the sauce. Place the sweetbread in casseroles or china cases, mix with them the sauce and vegetables, cook on the stove or in a moderate oven for 10 or 15 minutes, then serve.

Time.—Altogether, about 2 hours. Average Cost, 2s. 3d. to 3s. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons. Seasonable, all the year.

977.—LAMBS' SWEETBREADS, CROUSTADES OF. (Fr.Ris d'Agneau en Croustade.)

Ingredients.—1½ lb. of lambs' sweetbreads, ½ a pint of Béchamel sauce (see "Sauces"), stock, cooked green peas or a little spinach purée, finely-chopped truffle, salt and pepper, rough puff or puff paste.

Method.—Prepare the sweetbreads as directed in the preceding recipe. Have ready 8 or 9 oval or round, crisply-baked pastry cases, fill them with sweetbread, cover with sauce, and sprinkle lightly with truffle. Serve hot.

Time.—To cook the sweetbreads, about 1¼ hours. Average Cost, 1s. 9d. to 2s. 3d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons. Seasonable all the year.

978.—LAMBS' SWEETBREADS, FRIED. (Fr.Ris d'Agneau Frit.)

Ingredients.—1 lb. of lambs' sweetbreads, ⅓ of a pint of gravy, tomato sauce, or any other sauce preferred, 1 egg, breadcrumbs, butter or frying-fat, flour, salt and pepper.

Method.—Soak the sweetbreads in water for 2 hours, changing the water 3 or 4 times, then drain well, and place in a stewpan containing just sufficient cold water to cover them. Add a little salt, bring to the boil, cook gently for 15 minutes, then press between 2 dishes until cold. Roll lightly in a little flour seasoned with salt and pepper, coat carefully with egg and breadcrumbs, and fry in hot butter or fat until lightly browned. Serve the gravy or sauce separately.

Time.—To fry, 6 or 8 minutes. Average Cost, 2s. to 2s. 6d. per lb. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable at all times.

979.—LAMBS' SWEETBREADS, VOLTAIRE STYLE (Fr.Ris d'Agneau à la Voltaire.)

Ingredients.—8 lambs' sweetbreads, 8 artichoke bottoms, 1 oz. of butter, 1 oz. grated Parmesan cheese, 3 yolks of eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of Béchamel sauce (see Sauces), ½ a pint of good stock, 2 or 3 slices of bacon, 1 onion, 1 carrot, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), salt and pepper, meat glaze.

Method.—Blanch, drain, and trim the sweetbreads. Lay the slices of bacon, onion and carrot sliced, and the bouquet-garni on the bottom of a sauté-pan, ¾ cover them with stock, add seasoning if necessary, place the sweetbreads on the top, and cover with a buttered paper. Put the sauté-pan into a moderate oven and braise from 30 to 40 minutes, basting frequently, and adding more stock if necessary. When the sweetbreads are done, brush them over with warm glaze and keep them hot. Strain the stock into a small stewpan, skim well, then add the yolks of eggs and Béchamel sauce, previously mixed together, stir until it thickens, then pass through a tammy-cloth or fine hair sieve. Drain the artichokes well after cooking, or from the liquor when preserved ones are used, and place them in a well-buttered sauté-pan. Into each put a teaspoonful of the prepared sauce, lay the sweetbreads on the top, cover with sauce, and sprinkle well with the cheese. Melt the remainder of the butter, pour a little on each sweetbread, bake in a hot oven for 5 or 6 minutes, then arrange neatly on a hot dish, and serve with a suitable sauce.

Time.—From 1 to 1¼ hours. Average Cost, 1s. 9d. to 2s. 3d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

Note.—For other methods of cooking lambs' sweetbreads, see recipes for cooking veal.

980.—LAMBS' TAILS, RUSSIAN STYLE. (Fr.Queux d'Agneau à la Russe.)

Ingredients.—4 or 5 lambs' tails, 1½ pints of stock, 1 glass of Chablis (if liked), a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 2 cloves, ⅓ a pint of tomato sauce (see Sauces), frying-fat, salt and pepper. For the batter: 2 ozs. of flour, ½ a gill of tepid water, 1 tablespoonful of salad-oil or melted butter, the white of 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, 1 saltspoonful of salt.

Method.—Blanch the tails, cut them into small joints, return them to the stewpan with the stock, wine, bouquet-garni, cloves, salt and pepper to taste, and cook until tender. Allow them to cool in the stock, and, when ready to use, drain and dry well. Mix the flour, water, oil, and salt into a smooth batter, then add the parsley and white of egg stiffly whipped. Dip the pieces of tail in the batter, and fry them until nicely browned in hot fat. Garnish with parsley, and serve tomato sauce separately in a sauce-boat.

Time.—2 hours. Average Cost, uncertain, being seldom sold. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

981.—LAMBS' TAILS WITH POTATOES. (Fr.Queux d'Agneau aux Pommes de Terre.)

Ingredients.—3 or 4 lambs' tails, a few slices of bacon, 1 onion sliced, 1 carrot sliced, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 8 peppercorns, salt, stock, ⅓ of a pint of brown, tomato or other sauce, mashed potato.

Method.—Blanch and dry the tails. Place the vegetables, herbs and peppercorns in a stewpan, lay the tails on the top, add a little salt and pepper, and cover with bacon. Add stock to nearly cover the vegetables, put on the lid, which must fit closely, and cook gently for 2 hours, adding a little more stock from time to time. Serve in a border of mashed potatoes with the sauce poured over the meat.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, uncertain, lambs' tails being seldom sold. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable from April to October.

982.—LEG OF LAMB, FRENCH STYLE. (Fr.Gigot d'Agneau à la Française.)

Ingredients.—A small leg of lamb boned, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, 1 finely-chopped shallot, 1 clove of bruised garlic, 2 ozs. of butter, 1 onion sliced, 1 carrot sliced, salt and pepper.

Method.—Mix the parsley, shallot, garlic, and a good seasoning of salt and pepper together, and sprinkle the mixture on the inner surface of the meat. Bind the meat into a good shape, place it in a baking-tin containing the butter, onion and carrot, and season well with salt and pepper. Bake for ⅓ an hour in a hot oven, and afterwards at a lower temperature until the meat is cooked. Serve with gravy made from the bones and the sediment in the baking-tin (see "Gravies").

Time.—Allow 20 minutes per lb. Average Cost, 1d. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable from April to October.

983.—LOIN OF LAMB, ROLLED AND BRAISED. (Fr.Longe d'Agneau Braisée.)

Ingredients.—1 loin of lamb, a mirepoix of vegetables (see "Shoulder of Lamb, Braised"), stock, glaze, cooked peas, spinach or cucumber, salt and pepper.

Method.—Remove the bones, season the inner surface of the meat with salt and pepper, roll the flap under as tightly as possible, and bind with tape. Braise for about 2 hours (see "Shoulder of Lamb, Braised"), brush over with glaze, and serve on a bed of cooked peas, spinach, or cucumber.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 11d. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons. Seasonable, from April to October.

984.—MINCED LAMB. (Fr.Émincé d'Agneau.)

Ingredients.—1 lb. of cooked lamb, 1 finely-chopped medium-sized onion, ¾ of a pint of gravy or stock, 1 tablespoonful of mushroom ketchup, ¾ of an oz. of butter, ½ an oz. of flour, pepper and salt.

Method.—Cut the meat into small dice, and boil the bones and trimmings for 1 hour or longer, when stock is needed. Melt the butter in a stewpan, fry the onion until lightly browned, add the flour, and brown it also. Stir in the gravy or stock, add the ketchup and seasoning to taste, and simmer gently for 10 minutes. Put in the meat, draw the stewpan aside where the contents will be kept just below simmering point, and let it remain for at least ½ an hour. Serve, surrounded by a border of mashed potato, well-boiled rice, or sippets of toasted bread.

Time.—From 1 to 1½ hours. Average Cost, about 1s. 2d. Sufficient for 3 to 4 persons. Seasonable from April to October.

985.—NOISETTES OF LAMB. (Fr.Noisettes d'Agneau à la Union.)

Ingredients.—1 loin of lamb, 8 artichoke bottoms, 2 dozen fresh button mushrooms, 2½ ozs. of butter, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley, ¼ of a teaspoonful each of finely-chopped chive, chervil and tarragon, the juice of ½ a lemon, 1 tablespoonful of warm meat glaze or 1 teaspoonful of meat extract, ¼ of a pint of stock, ¼ of a pint of demi-glace sauce (see Sauces), salt and pepper.

Method.—Remove the fillet from the loin, and divide it into 8 slices, which, when properly cut, are round and entirely free from fat. Prepare the mushrooms, chop them finely, and fry them lightly in 1 oz. of butter. Warm the artickoke bottoms in the stock; to the mushroom purée add the lemon-juice, herbs, glaze, or meat juice, season to taste, mix well together over the fire, then fill the artichokes with the preparation, and keep them warm. Heat the remainder of the butter in a sauté-pan, and fry the noisettes quickly until lightly browned. Arrange in 2 rows on a hot dish, place an artichoke bottom on the top of each, pour the demi-glace sauce round, and serve.

Time.—About ½ an hour. Average Cost, 1s. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

986.—RAGOÛT OF LAMB WITH SORREL. (Fr.Ragout d'Agneau à l'Oseille')

Ingredients.—2 or 3 lb. of neck or breast of lamb, ½ a pint of boiling stock, 2 ozs. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, 1 onion, 1 small carrot, 1 strip of celery, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), the yolks of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of cream, ¼ of a pint of sorrel purée, or, if more convenient, ¼ of a pint of spinach purée mixed with the juice of ½ a lemon, salt and pepper.

Method.—Trim the meat, and blanch it by putting it into cold water, bringing it slowly to the boil, and then immersing it for a few minutes in seasoned salt water. Drain, dry well, and cut into 2-inch squares. Heat the butter in a stewpan, and fry the sliced vegetables for 15 minutes, but do not let them brown. Now sprinkle in the flour, stir and cook for 3 or 4 minutes, then add the boiling stock, herbs, ¼ of a teaspoonful of salt, ½ the quantity of pepper, and stir until smooth. Lay the pieces of meat in the sauce, put on the lid, which should fit closely, and simmer very gently for about 1½ hours. Meanwhile cook the sorrel or spinach (see Vegetables), rub it through a fine sieve, and season to taste. When the meat is ready, pile it in the centre of a hot dish. Strain the sauce into another stewpan, and add the sorrel purée, when nearly boiling put in the yolks of 2 eggs and cream, previously mixed together, and stir until the sauce thickens. Season to taste, pour over the meat, and serve.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 10d. per lb. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

987.—ROAST FORE-QUARTER OF LAMB. (Fr.Quartier d'Agneau Rôti.)

Ingredients.—Fore-quarter of lamb, mint sauce (see No. 256).

Method.—See "Roast Lamb" and "Notes on Roasting," p. 407. Serve with gravy made from the sediment in the roasting-tin, and mint sauce.

Time.—1½ to 2 hours, according to size. Average Cost, 11d. to 1s. 2d. Sufficient for 8 to 12 persons, according to weight. Seasonable, grass lamb from March to September.

988.—ROAST LAMB. (Fr.Agneau Rôti.)

Lamb, when roasting, requires more attention than any other kind of meat No part of it must be underdone, and to secure this result without drying and hardening the thinner portions to an undesirable degree, much care is necessary. The intense heat to which all meat must first be subjected for a few minutes is applied for too short a time to affect the colour of a joint kept constantly in motion, and the subsequent browning and over-cooking of any part may be obviated by covering the meat with 2 or 3 folds of well-greased paper, and by frequent basting. The amount of heat applied to any part may be regulated by raising or lowering the joint on the spit, and the rate of cooking by increasing or decreasing the distance between the joint and the fire. See "Notes on Roasting," p. 407.

989.—SHOULDER OF LAMB, BRAISED. (Fr.Epaule d'Agneau Braisée.)

Ingredients.—A shoulder of lamb, larding bacon, 1 pint of stock, 3 ozs. of butter, 1½ ozs. of flour, 2 shallots finely-chopped, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley. For the mirepoix: 2 onions, 2 carrots, ½ a small turnip, a bouquet-garni (parsley, thyme, bay-leaf), 6 peppercorns. Meat glaze.

Method.—Bone the shoulder, season well with salt and pepper, roll up tightly, and bind securely with string. Cut the lardoons, or strips of bacon for insertion in the meat, about 2 inches long, and rather more than ⅛ of an inch in thickness, and insert close rows in the rolled meat. Slice the vegetables, and put them into a large braize-pan with 1½ ozs. of butter, place the meat on the top, cover closely, and cook gently for 20 minutes. Add the herbs, peppercorns, and stock to nearly cover the vegetables, place a buttered paper over the meat, put on the lid, and braise in the oven for 2 hours, ½ an hour before serving,

ENTRÉES.

 
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1. Chaud-froid of Lamb Cutlets. 2. Chicken Timbales, in Aspic. 3. Stuffed Larks, in Cases.

SUPPER DISHES.

 
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1. Savory Mince Croustades. 2. Beef Polantine. 3. Fish Kedgeree.

melt the remaining butter in a stewpan, fry the shallots slightly, then add the flour and cook until it acquires a nut-brown colour. When the meat is ready, remove the strings, brush it over with stock reduced to glaze, and put it into a moderate oven for a few minutes to crisp the bacon. Strain the stock, increase the quantity to ¾ of a pint, pour it over the brown roux or thickening, and stir until it boils. Add to it the parsley, season to taste, simmer for 2 or 3 minutes, then serve in a sauce-boat. Cooked tomatoes, mushrooms, fancifully-cut turnips and carrots, small timbales of spinach or green pea purée, haricots verts and macedoine are all suitable garnish for this dish.

Time.—To braise, about 2 hours. Average Cost, 10d. to 1s. 1d. per lb.

Note.—The loin, neck or breast may be cooked in this manner. If preferred, the shoulder may be stuffed with sausage meat or veal forcemeat, and the larding may in all cases be omitted, if more convenient.

990.—SHOULDER OF LAMB, STUFFED. (Fr.Epaule d'Agneau Farcie.)

Ingredients.—A shoulder of lamb, veal forcemeat, No. 396, ¾ of a pint of stock, 1 oz. of butter, ¾ of an oz. of flour, 2 or 3 ozs. of dripping, salt and pepper.

Method.—Remove the bones and boil them for at least 1 hour for stock. Flatten the meat with a cutlet-bat or heavy knife, season well with salt and pepper, and spread on the forcemeat. Roll up lightly, tie securely with string, and place in a baking-tin in which the dripping has been previously melted. Baste well, put it into a moderate oven, and cook gently for about 1¼ hours, basting frequently. Meanwhile fry the butter and flour together until well browned, add the prepared stock, stir until boiling, and season to taste. Remove the meat and keep it hot, pour off the fat without disturbing the sediment in the tin, and add the brown sauce. Replace the meat, and cook it gently for 20 minutes longer, basting frequently meanwhile. Serve with a little sauce poured over the meat, and send the remainder to table in a tureen. If preferred, the meat may be braised according to directions given in reference to "Loin of Lamb, Rolled and Braised."

Time.—About 1½ hours. Average Cost, 11d. to 1s. 2d. per lb. Sufficient for 4 or 5 persons. Seasonable all the year.