Notes on Nursing: What It Is, and What It Is Not/Index

INDEX.



PAGE
Disease is a reparative process 7
Of the sufferings of disease; disease
not always the cause
7
What nursing ought to do 8
Nursing the sick little understood 8
Nursing ought to assist the reparative
process
8
Nursing the well little understood 9
Curious deductions from an excessive death rate 9
First rule of nursing to keep the air
within as pure as the air without
11
Why are uninhabited rooms shut
up?
11
Without chill 12
Open windows 13
What kind of warmth desirable 13
Bedrooms almost universally foul 13
An air-test of essential consequence 14
When warmth must be carefully
looked to
14
Cold air not ventilation, nor fresh
air a method of chill
15
Night air. Air from outside. Open
your windows, shut your doors
16
Smoke. Airing damp things in a
patient's room. Effluvia from
exereta
17
Chamber utensils without lids 18
Don't make your sick room into a
sewer
18
Abolish slop pails. Fumigations.
Health of houses—five points essential.
Health of carriages
19
Pure air, pure water 20
Drainage. Sinks 21
Cleanliness. Light 22
Three common errors in managing
the health of houses
22
Head in charge must see to house
hygiene, not do it herself
23
Does God think of these things so
seriously?
23
How does he carry out his laws? 24
How does he teach his laws? 24
Servants' rooms 24
Physical degeneration in families;
its causes. Don't make your sick
room into a ventilating shaft for
the whole house. Infection. Diseases
are not individuals arranged
in classes, like cats and dogs, but
conditions growing out of one
another
25
Why must children have measles,
&c.? Petty management
27
Illustrations of the want of it 28
Strangers coming into sick room 28
Sick room airing the whole house 28
Uninhabited room fouling the
whole house. Lingering smell of
paint a want of care
28
Delivery and non-delivery of letters
and messages
29
Partial messages such as "being always
in the way" yourself, increase
instead of saving the patient's
anxiety, because they must
be only partial. Why let your
patient ever be surprised?
29
What is the cause of half the accidents
which happen?
30
Petty management better understood
in institutions than in private
houses. What institutions
are the exception? Nursing in
regimental hospitals
31
What it is to be "in charge" 32
Why hired nurses give so much
trouble. Unnecessary noise. Never
let a patient be waked out of
his first sleep.
34
Noise which excites expectation 35
Whispered conversation in the
room, or just outside the door
35, 36
Noise of female dress. Patient's
repulsion to nurses who rustle
36
Burning of the crinolines 37
Indecency of the crinolines 37
Hurry peculiarly hurtful to the sick 37
How to visit the sick, and not hurt
them. These things not fancy
38
Interruption damaging to sick and
to well
38, 39
Keeping a patient standing. Patients
dread surprise. Never speak
to a patient in the art of moving
39
Effects of over-exertion of sick 40
Careless observation of the results
of careless visits
40
Difference between real and fancy
patients
41
Conciseness necessary with sick 41
Irresolution most painful to them 42
What a patient must not have to
see to. Reading aloud
42
Read aloud slowly, distinctly, and
steadily to the sick
43
Never read aloud by fits and starts
to the sick. The sick would rather
be told a thing than have it read
to them
43
People overheard. Music 44
Variety a means of recovery 44
Color and form means of recovery;
this is no fancy. Flowers
45
Effects of body and mind 46
Sick suffer to excess from mental as
well as bodily pain. Help the
sick to vary their thoughts
46
Desperate desire in the sick to "see
out of window." Supply to the
sick the defect of manual labor
47
Physical effect of color. Want of attention
to hours of taking food
49
Patients often starved to death in
chronic cases. Food never to be
left by the patient's side. Patient
had better not see more
food than his own.
50


PAGE
You cannot be too careful as to
quality in sick diet
51
Nurse must have some rule of
thought about her patient's diet.
Nurse must have some rule of
time about the patient's diet
52
Keep your patient's cup dry underneath.
Common errors in diet.
Beef tea. Eggs. Meat without
vegetables
53
Arrowroot. Milk, butter, cream, &c.
Intelligent cravings of particular
sick for particular articles of diet
54
Sweet things. Jelly 55
Beef tea. Observation, not chemistry,
must decide sick diet
56
Home-made bread. Sound observation
has scarcely yet been
brought to bear on sick diet
57
Tea and coffee. Cocoa 58, 59
Bulk. Feverishness a symptom of
bedding. Uncleanliness of ordinary
bedding. Nurses often do
not think the sick room any business
of theirs, but only the sick
60
Air your dirty sheets, not only your
clean ones
61
Iron spring bedsteads the best.
Comfort and cleanliness of two
beds. Bed not to be too wide
62
Bed not to be too high, nor in a
dark place, nor a four-poster with
curtains. Scrofula often a result
of disposition of bed clothes.
Bed sores. Heavy and impervious
bed clothes
63
Light essential to both health and
recovery
64
Aspect, view, and sunlight, matters
of first importance to the sick
65
Without sunlight, we degenerate
body and mind. Almost all patients
lie with their faces to the
light. Cleanliness of carpets and
furniture
66
Dust never removed now. How a
room is dusted
67
Floors. Papered, plastered, oil-painted
walls. Atmosphere in
painted and papered rooms quite
distinguishable. Best kind of
wall for a sick room. How to
keep your wall clean at the expense
of your clothes
68
Dirty air from without. Best kind
of wall for a house. Dirty air
from within. Dirty air from the
carpet. Remedies
69
Poisoning by the skin 70
Ventilation and skin-cleanliness
equally essential
71
Steaming and rubbing the skin.
Advising the sick
72
Chattering hopes the bane of the
sick
73
Patient does not want to talk of
himself. Absurd statistical comparisons
made in common, conversation
by the most sensible
people for the benefit of the sick.
Absurd consolations put forth for
the benefit of the sick
74
Wonderful presumption of the advisers
of the sick. Advisers the
same now as two hundred years
ago. Mockery of the advice given
to sick
76
Means of giving pleasure to the
sick
77
Two new classes of patients peculiar
to this generation. What
is the use of the question, Is he
better?
79
Leading questions useless or misleading 81
Means of obtaining inaccurate information 82
As to food patient takes or does
not take
83
As to diarrhœa. More important to
spare the patient thought than
physical exertion. Means of cultivating
sound and ready observation
83, 84
Sound and ready observation essential
in a nurse
85
English women have great capacity
of, but little practice in, close observation
86
Difference of excitable and accumulative
temperaments. Superstition
the fruit of bad observation.
Physiognomy of disease little
shown by the face
87
Peculiarities of patients. Nurse
must observe for herself increase
of patient's weakness; patient
will not tell her. Accidents arising
from the nurse's want of observation
89
Is the faculty of observing on the
decline? Observation of general
conditions. Approach of death;
paleness by no means an invariable
effect, as we find in novels
90
"Average rate of mortality" tells
us only that so many per cent,
will die. Observation must tell
us which in the hundred they will
be who will die
93
What observation is for. What a
confidential nurse should be
94
Observation is for practical purposes.
Sanitary nursing as essential
in surgical as in medical
cases, but not to supersede surgical
nursing
95
Children: their greater susceptibility
to the same things
96
Summary. Reckless amateur physicking
by women. Real knowledge
of the laws of health alone
can check this. Danger of physicking
by amateur females
98
What pathology teaches. What observation
alone teaches. What
medicine does. What nature alone
does
l00