Office O'Leary at the Crossing

Officer O'Leary at the Crossing  (1905) 
by Wallace Irwin

Extracted from Smart Set magazine, vol 16, 1905, pg. 96.

OFFICER O'LEARY AT THE CROSSING

'TIS all along Fifth avenue, as wheels the grand display
Of hansom, coach, victoria, of landau and coupé,
That like Napoleon Bonaparte reviewing his array,
Stands Officer O'Leary at the crossing.

"Whoa, there! slow there! Can't ye understand?
Dhraw back! shtop that hack whin Oi howld up me hand.
That's the way ye must obey whin th' gineral gives command,"
Says Officer O'Leary at the crossing.

'Tis all along Fifth avenue the city orchid blooms,
The miles and miles of many styles, furs and silks and plumes;
But keen and stern, the censor of the coachmen and the grooms,
Stands Officer O'Leary at the crossing.

"Whoa, now! slow now! Put yer horse to grass!
Aisy, sure, ye fresh chafoor—don't give me anny sass!
Halt, Oi say, an' open way to let this lady pass!"
Says Officer O'Leary at the crossing.

Half a mile of millionaires along that moving chain,
Dappled grays and thoroughbreds with cropped and arching mane—
But Maggie Flynn, the milliner, need not appeal in vain
To break the grand procession at the crossing.

"Whoa, there! slow there! Don't give me anny chin!
Stiddy, sure, ye fresh chafoor, before I run yez in!
Whin Oi've me say ye'll all give way fer little Maggie Flynn,"
Says Officer O'Leary at the crossing.

Wallace Irwin.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1927.


The author died in 1959, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 60 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.