Page:A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Confederacy, Including the Diplomatic Correspondence, 1861-1865, Volume I.djvu/229

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199
First Congress.

Richmond, March 13, 1862.

To the House of Representatives.

In response to the resolution of the 26th ultimo calling for a statement as to the establishments under contract for the supply of small arms and of powder, and what means are employed in furnishing percussion caps, and whether the various manufacturing establishments now employed by the Government will be able to furnish an ample supply of arms, powder, and percussion caps for the use of our Army, I herewith transmit a report to the Secretary of War, which gives such information in relation to the ability of the establishments employed as, it is hoped, will be satisfactory to the Congress. The Government has secured a supply of sulphur sufficient for any proximate want; proper charcoal can be obtained in any requisite quantity, and it only requires an adequate supply of saltpeter to insure the manufacture of more powder than can be profitably used. In addition to the mills now in active operation a very extensive one has been constructed in Georgia, which we have not started because the supply of saltpeter did not justify it. Establishments for the manufacture of small arms are being constructed and developed, but, as was to have been anticipated, the progress has been slow and the want of mechanics does not permit us to hope for such extensive results as would satisfy existing necessities. The attention of Congress is called to the remarks of the Secretary on the subject of iron, and a method of increasing its production. For further information reference is made to the tabular statement of the Chief of Ordnance, which is annexed to the letter of the Secretary of War.

Jeff'n Davis.


Executive Department, March 14, 1862.

To the House of Representatives.

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of the Treasury, with estimates of appropriations required for the support of the Government from April 1 to November 30, 1862. The estimates of the various Executive Departments are inclosed, and it will be seen by the letter of the Secretary of the Treasury that no estimates for the expenses of the Congress have been received.

Jefferson Davis.