Open main menu

Page:A Garland for Girls (1893).djvu/27

This page has been validated.
7
MAY FLOWERS.

olution inside and was afraid it might evaporate before she got home.

"I shall stand on the Common, and proclaim aloud, 'Here’s a nice young missionary, in want of a job! Charity for sale cheap! Who'll buy? who'll buy?" said Maggie, with a resigned expression, and a sanctimonious twang to her voice.

"I shall wait and see what comes to me, since I don't know what I'm fit for;" and Marion gazed out of the window as if expecting to see some interesting pauper waiting for her to appear.

"I shall ask Miss Bliss for advice; she knows all about the poor, and will give me a good start," added prudent Ida, who resolved to do nothing rashly lest she should fail.

"I shall probably have a class of dirty little girls, and teach them how to sew, as I can't do anything else. They won't learn much, but steal, and break, and mess, and be a dreadful trial, and I shall get laughed at and wish I had n't done it. Still I shall try it, and sacrifice my fancy-work to the cause of virtue," said Ella, carefully putting away her satin glove-case with a fond glance at the delicate flowers she so loved to embroider.

"I have no plans, but want to do so much I shall have to wait till I discover what is best. After to-day we won’t speak of our work, or it won t be a secret any longer. In May we will report. Good luck to all, and good-by till next Saturday."

With these farewell words from their president the girls departed, with great plans and new ideas simmering in their young heads and hearts.