Page:A Grammar of the Urdū Or Hindūstānī Language in Its Romanized Character.djvu/46

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The Compounds of sau ('100') are expressed as in English—only omitting the word wa ('and'); thus '110' would be ek sau das, '120' ek sau Ms, etc. A 'thousand' is expressed either by the Persian word hazar, or by das sau—'ten hundred.'

38. We think it well to append the Native characters for the Cardinal Numbers—both Arabic and Indian—as it is of great use to be familiar with them.

Koman 1234567890 10 14 37 50 134
Arabic (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters)
Indian (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters) (Symbol missingsymbol characters)

The student is advised to make himself familiar with the Native figures (especially the Arabic) by copying them out repeatedly, and to get the table of Cardinal Numbers by heart till he knows it as well as his ABC.

39. By adding the word ek (' one') to any of the Cardinal Numbers (single or compound) the idea of indefiniteness is expressed. Thus do-ek, means 'about 2,' das-ek 'about ten' ('9 or 10,' '10 or 11'), sau-ek 'about a hundred.' 'About one' is expressed by ek-ād, signifying either '½' or 'one' (ād being either for ārdhā 'a half,' or as some think for the Sanskrit ādi 'beginning'—i.e. 'beginning with one' or 'one, etc.' ('one or two'). The like idea is conveyed by two Numbers (not generally consecutive)—as, do-tīn or do-chār= our ' 2 or 3 '; āth-das=our '8 or 9,' etc.