Page:A Sicilian Romance (1792) vol. 1.djvu/23

This page has been validated.

(12)

their custom to dine in one of the lower apartments, and at table they were always joined by a dependant of the marquis's, who had resided many years in the castle, and who instructed the young ladies in the Latin tongue, and in geography. During the fine evenings of summer, this little party frequently supped in a pavilion, which was built on an eminence in the woods belonging to the castle. From this spot the eye had an almost boundless range of sea and land. It commanded the straits of Medina, with the opposite shores of Calabria, and a great extent of the wild and picturesque scenery of Sicily. Mount Etna, crowned with eternal snows, and shooting from among the clouds, formed a grand and sublime picture in the back ground of the scene. The city of Palermo was also distinguishable ; and Julia, as she gazed on its glittering spires, would endeavour in imagination to depicture its