Page:Condor19(2).djvu/6

This page needs to be proofread.


32 THE CONDOR Vol. XIX 8. Querquedula discors. Blue-winged Teal. Several seen on a small storage pond' on Ice House Creek, August 17. 9; Olor buccinator. Trumpeter Swan. Occurs sparingly on Henry Lake. Sev- eral mounted specimens examined in the collection at Lake Post Office, including a fe* male with two young taken on the Lake. .' 10. Ardea herodias herodias. Great Blue Heron. Fairly common along marshes near North Fork of the Snake River. Five adults seen at one time on August 18. A young male about half grown was taken on Little Dry Creek, near Spencer, July 14. 11. Porzana carolina. Sora Rail. One specimen found dead floating on the water near the shore of Henry Lake, August 25. 12. FuHca americana. Coot. A small flock observed on a pond at Camas Mead- ows, near Kilgore, August 26. 13. Recurvirostra americana. Avocet. A flock of eight adults observed in a small shallow overflow pond near Small, June 20.. 'The pond was cnly a short distance from a ranch house, and the birds were quite ta? allowing a close approach. They remained about the pond the entire day, probabl? t0 rest. 14. kobipes Iobatus. Northern PhalarOPe[ Two seen in company with Avocets on a small pond near Small, June 20, 15. Gallinago delicata. Wilson Snipe. ?. One seen in a small swampy meadow along Ice House Creek, and several seen at Camas Meadows, August 26. 16. Ereunetes mauri. Western Sandpiper. A small flock seen near the shore of Henry Lake, and also along an irrigation ditch near Spencer, August 27. 17. Actiris macularia. Spotted Sahdpiper. Common along streams and ponds throughout the county. Young still in the downy stage seen at Woods Reservoir, on the West Fork of Camas Creek, July 16. 18. Oxyechus vociferus. Killdeer. Common along streams and ponds throughout the county. 19. Dendragapus obscurus richardsoni. Richardson Grouse. One mal? seen in Little Dry Creek Canyon, July 8. A female with three young was seen in the same can- yon among Douglas firs, August 1?. 20. Bonasa umbeHus togata. Canada Ruffed Grouse. Two adult males seen on July 8 in Little Dry Creek Canyon, among Douglas firs near the creek. A female with about ten nearly grown young was flushed from a lodgepole pine thicket along the road near the North Fork of the Snake River, near Rea Post Office, on August 26. 21. Pedioecetes phasianellus columbianus. Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse. Be- coming very rare throughout the county. One small flock was observed on August 26, among sage brush, along the road near Kilgore. 22. Centrocerc-s urophasianus. Sage G?ouse. Until recent years abundant throughout the county, now becoming very scarce. A female with two young was seen on a high ridge, july 8, a female with four young at Burnside Ranch, July 10, a female with two young near Highbridge, August 10, three adult birds on a high ridge near Sp.encer, July 31, one adult near Sheridan Creek, August 17, and a flock of about six, two of which were secured, near Kilgore, August 26. These are all the birds I saw during the three months spent in Fremont County. found one deserted nest containing six eggs, July 9. I?.:)vas a commo? sight to see par- ties of sportsmen hunting Sage Grouse over the plain?,i n automobiles, and the ease and rapidity of this style of hunting will soon ex?t?,?nlinate the species entirely. 23. Zenaidura macroura' carolinensiS[ ':? Mburning Dove. Found breeding in con- siderable numbers in ?i?1ow thickets along sm'//11 streams in the vicinity of Spencer,' June 8. One nest with'two eggs was found on the ground under sage brush, June 16. The majority of nests were from two to five feet from the ground in bent-over willows. 24. Cathartes aura septentrionalis. Turkey Vulture. Two seen July 31, near a high ridge at the head of Little Dry Creek Canyon. 25. Circus hudsonius. Marsh Hawk. Several seen July 18, along Camas Mea- dows near Kilgore. 26. Accipiter velox. Sharp-shinned Hawk. A pair observed a number of times during the latter part of June and during July, in a Douglas fir thicket in Little Dry Creek Canyon. They were probably nesting.