Page:Dictionary of National Biography, Second Supplement, volume 3.djvu/158

This page needs to be proofread.
Quilter
Quilter
148

Quilter's separate publications include: 1. A thin volume of light verse, 'Idle Hours,' by 'Shingawn' (a name taken from a sensational story in the London Journal of the time), 1872. 2. 'Giotto,' 1880; new edit. 1881. 3. 'The Academy: Notice of Pictures exhibited at the R.A. 1872-82,' 1883. 4. 'Sententiæ Artis: First Principles of Art,' 1886. 5. 'Preferences in Art, Life, and Literature,' 1892. 6. 'Opinions on Men, Women and Things,' 1909 (a collection of periodical essays made by his widow). He edited an edition of Meredith's 'Jump to Glory Jane' (1892), and illustrated one of Browning's 'Pied Piper of Hamelin' (1898).

[Quilter's Opinions, 1909; Who's Who, 1906; The Times, 13 July 1907; Morning Post, 12 July 1907; Mrs. C. W. Earle, Memoirs and Memories, 1911, pp. 291-8; information kindly supplied by Mrs. Harry Quilter (now Mrs. MacNalty) and his sister, Mrs. S. E. Muter.]

W. R.


QUILTER, Sir WILLIAM CUTHBERT, first baronet (1841–1911), art collector and politician, born in London on 29 Jan. 1841, eldest brother of Harry Quilter [q. v. Suppl, II], was educated privately. After five years (1858-63) in his father's business he started on his own account with a partner as a stockbroker, and eventually founded the firm of Quilter, Balfour & Co. in 1885. He was one of the founders of the National Telephone Co. (registered on 10 March 1881), and was a director and large shareholder till his death. In 1883 he bought the Bawdsey estate near Felixstowe, extending to about 9000 acres, and spent large sums on sea defences, a spacious manor house, and an alpine garden (see Gardeners' Chronicle, 12 Dec. 1908). He showed enterprise as an agriculturist, particularly as a cattle-breeder (see The Times, 20 Nov. 1911). A keen yachtsman, he owned at various times several well-known boats, and was vice-commodore of the Royal Harwich Yacht Club (1875-1909). Quilter was elected as a liberal for the Sudbury division of Suffolk in Dec. 1885. Declining to accept Gladstone's home rule policy, he was re-elected unopposed as a liberal unionist in July 1886 and continued to represent the same constituency in parliament until the dissolution of Dec. 1905. Being returned after a contest in 1892, and unopposed in 1895 and 1900, he was defeated by 136 votes in Jan. 1906. He rarely spoke in the house. He was created a baronet on 13 Sept. 1897 ; and was a J.P. and D.L. for Suffolk, and an alderman of the West Suffolk county council. Inheriting his father's taste for pictures, he formed a collection on different lines, confining himself to no one period or school. He was generous in loans to public exhibitions. Nearly the whole of his collection was displayed at Lawrie's Galleries, 159 Bond Street, in Nov. 1902, in aid of King Edward's Hospital Fund (cf. description by F. G. Stephens in Magazine of Art, vols. 20 and 21, privately reprinted with numerous illustrations). He presented Sir Hubert von Herkomer's portrait of Spencer Compton Cavendish, eighth duke of Devonshire [q. v. Suppl. II], to the National Portrait Gallery in 1909 {The Times, 21 July 1909). The collection of his pictures at his London house, 28 South Street, Park Lane (120 lots), realised 87,780l at Christie's on 9 July 1909 (The Times, 10 July 1909 ; Connoisseur, July 1909; Catalogue Raisonné of the collection, by M. W. Brockwell and W. Roberts, privately printed,100 copies, 1909).

He died suddenly at Bawdsey on 18 Nov 1911, and was buried in the parish church yard. His estate was valued at 1,220,639’'l., with net personalty 1,035,974’'l. (The Times, 15 Jan. 1912). He married on 7 May 1867 Mary Ann, daughter of John Wheeley Bevington of Brighton. She survived him with five sons and two daughters.

His portrait by Sir Hubert von Herkomer was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1890 ; a caricature by 'Lib’ (Prosperi) appeared in 'Vanity Fair' on 9 Feb. 1889.

[The Times, 20 Nov. 1911 ; Burke's Peerage, 1911 ; Who's Who, 1909 ; personal knowledge; information kindly supplied by Mr. A. J. Grout, Sir Cuthbert's private secretary.]

W. R.