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(1819–22), and was also connected with him in the erection of three London chapels (1822–4) [see under Inwood, William]. Inwood was a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, and for many years, from 1809, an exhibitor at the Royal Academy. He is supposed to have died on 20 March 1843, about which time a vessel in which he had sailed for Spain was lost with all on board. Inwood published: 1. ‘The Erechtheion at Athens; fragments of Athenian architecture, and a few remains in Attica, Megara, Eleusis, illustrated,’ London, 1827, fol. A German work, ‘Das Erechtheion,’ Potsdam, 1843, by A. F. Quast, is based on this. 2. ‘Of the Resources of Design in the Architecture of Greece, Egypt, and other Countries obtained by … studies … from Nature,’ London, 1834, 4to (only two parts published).

[Architectural Publ. Soc. Dict.; Redgrave's Dict. of Artists.]

W. W.

INWOOD, WILLIAM (1771?–1843), architect and surveyor, was born about 1771 at Caen Wood, Highgate, where his father, Daniel Inwood, was bailiff to Lord Mansfield. He was brought up as an architect and surveyor, and became steward to Lord Colchester and practised as a surveyor. He designed numerous mansions, villas, barracks, warehouses, &c. In 1821 he planned the new galleries for St. John's Church, Westminster, and in 1832–3 designed, with the assistance of his second son, Charles Frederick Inwood (see below), the new Westminster Hospital. His best-known work is St. Pancras New Church, London, in the designing of which after Greek models, especially the Athenian Erechtheion, he was assisted by his eldest son, Henry William Inwood [q. v.] This church was built between 1 July 1819 and 7 May 1822, and cost 63,251l., exclusive of the organ and fittings (Britton and Pugin, Public Edifices, 1825, i. 145; Walford, Old and New London, v. 353). Its style is severely criticised by Fergusson (Hist. of Architecture, 2nd edit. iv. 334, 335), who says its erection ‘contributed more than any other circumstances to hasten the reaction towards the Gothic style, which was then becoming fashionable.’ Inwood also erected in London, with the assistance of his eldest son, St. Martin's Chapel, Camden Town, 1822–1824; Regent Square Chapel, 1824–6; Somers Town Chapel, Upper Seymour Street, 1824–7. From 1813 Inwood for several years exhibited architectural designs at the Royal Academy. He died at his house in Upper Seymour Street, London, on 16 March 1843 (in the ‘Gentleman's Magazine’ for 1843, new ser. xix. 547, he is described as ‘late of Euston Square’). He was buried in the family vault in St. Pancras New Church. He had many pupils, one of whom was W. Railton the architect. Inwood published (in 1811 or 1819?) ‘Tables for the Purchasing of Estates … and for the Renewal of Leases held under … Corporate Bodies.’ A second edition of this well-known work, which was founded on the tables of Baily and Smart, appeared in 1820, and the 21st edition, by F. Thoman, in 1880.

His eldest son, Henry William [q. v.], is separately noticed. His second, Charles Frederick Inwood (1798–1840), also an architect, acted as assistant to his father and brother, designed All Saints' Church, Great Marlow (opened 1835), and the St. Pancras National Schools, London.

[Architectural Publ. Soc. Dict.; Redgrave's Dict. of Artists.]

W. W.

IOLO GOCH, or the Red (fl. 1328–1405), Welsh bard, whose real name is said to be Edward Llwyd, was lord of Llechryd and resided at Coed Pantwn in Denbighshire, his mother, according to Gruffydd Hiraethog [q. v.], being the Countess of Lincoln. The recently extinct family of Pantons of Plasgwyn, Anglesey, traced its descent from Iolo. He is said to have received a university education, and to have taken the degrees of M.A. and Doctor of Laws. According to a statement in a late manuscript (printed in Iolo MSS. pp. 96, 491), he attended the last of the ‘three Eisteddfods of the Renascence’ of Welsh literature (Tair Eisteddfod Dadeni), which was held, probably in 1330, at Maelor (Bromfield), under the patronage and protection of Roger Mortimer, first earl of March. Dafydd ap Gwilym [q. v.] was the president, and Iolo was made a ‘chaired bard’ for his knowledge of the laws of poetry, his tutor being Ednyfed ab Gruffydd. Iolo must have been quite a young man at the time. A difficulty has been made as to his date, because he wrote an elegy on the death of Tudur ab Gronw, of the family of Ednyved Fychan of Penmynydd, Anglesey, who is said to have died in 1315; but it appears from a genealogical table of that family (Archæologia Cambrensis, 3rd ser. xv. 378) that there was another Tudur ab Gronw, who died in 1367 (Y Cymmrodor, v. 261–3), and the elegy probably referred to the latter. Iolo was a staunch friend of Owen Glendower [q. v.], who owned a neighbouring estate. When Owen was in the height of his glory he invited Iolo to stay at his house at Sycharth, which must have been before 2 May 1402, when it was burned by Hotspur; and after his visit the poet wrote a glowing description of the splendour of Owen's palace,