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97
CHESS

Queen’s Gambit.

White. Black.
1. P – Q4 1. P – Q4
2. P – QB4 2. P × P
3. P – K3 3. P – K4
4. B × P 4. P × P
5. P × P 5. B – Q3
6. Kt – KB3 6. Kt – KB3
7. Castles 7. Castles
8. P – KR3 8. P – KR3
9. Kt – QB3   9. P – QB3

The game is about equal, though White has a somewhat freer position.

The following is a selection of noteworthy games played by great masters:—

King’s Bishop’s Gambit.

White.
Anderssen.
Black.
Kieseritzki.
 1. P – K4  1. P – K4
 2. P – KB4  2. P × P
 3. B – B4  3. Q – R5 (ch)
 4. K – B sq  4. P – QKt4
 5. B × KtP  5. Kt – KB3
 6. Kt – KB3    6. Q – R3
 7. P – Q3  7. Kt – R4
 8. Kt – R4  8. Q – Kt4
 9. Kt – B5  9. P – QB3
10. P – KKt4 10. Kt – B3
11. R – Kt sq 11. P × B
12. P – KR4 12. Q – Kt3
13. P – R5 13. Q – Kt4
14. Q – B3 14. Kt – Kt sq
15. B × P 15. Q – B3
16. Kt – B3 16. B – B4
17. Kt – Q5 17. Q × KtP
18. B – Q6 18. Q × R (ch)
19. K – K2 19. B × R
20. P – K5 20. Kt – QR3

White mates in three moves.

Philidor’s Defence.

White.
Barnes.
Black.
Morphy.
 1. P – K4  1. P – K4
 2. Kt – KB3  2. P – Q3
 3. P – Q4  3. P – KB4
 4. P × KP  4. BP × P
 5. Kt – Kt5  5. P – Q4
 6. P – K6  6. B – QB4
 7. Kt – B7  7. Q – B3
 8. B – K3  8. P – Q5
 9. B – KKt5  9. Q – B4
10. Kt × R 10. Q × B
11. B – B4 11. Kt – QB3
12. Kt – B7 12. Q × P
13. R – B sq 13. Kt – B3
14. P – KB3 14. Kt – QKt5
15. Kt – QR3 15. B × P
16. B × B 16. Kt – Q6 (ch)
17. Q × Kt 17. P × Q
18. Castles 18. B × Kt
19. B – Kt3 19. P – Q7 (ch)
20. K – Kt sq   20. B – B4
21. Kt – K5 21. K – B sq
22. Kt – Q3 22. R – K sq
23. Kt × B 23. Q × R

And White resigns.

Bishop’s Gambit.

White.
Charousek.
Black.
 Tchigorin. 
White.
Charousek.
Black.
Tchigorin.
 1. P – K4 P – K4 13. Q × P (ch) K – K2
 2. P – KB4 P × P 14. Kt × P Kt × Kt
 3. B – B4 Kt – QB3 15. B × Kt P – R3
 4. P – Q4 Kt – B3 16. Kt – B3 B – B5
 5. P – K5 P – Q4 17. P – K6 R – B sq
 6. B – Kt3 B – Kt5 18. B – B7 P × P
 7. Q – Q3 Kt – KR4 19. B × Q (ch) R × B
 8. Kt – KR3 Kt – Kt5 20. Q – Kt7 (ch) R – Q2
 9. Q – QB3 Kt – R3 21. R – B7 (ch) K × R
10. Castles B – K7 22. Q × R (ch) B – K2
11. B – R4 (ch)   P – B3 23. R – K sq R – K sq
12. B × P (ch) P × B 24. P – QKt3 Resigns.

This pretty game was played in the tie match for first prize at the Budapest tournament, 1896.


Queen’s Gambit Declined.

White.
W. Steinitz.
Black.
 Dr E. Lasker. 
White.
W. Steinitz.
Black.
Dr E. Lasker.
 1. P – Q4 P – Q4 21. Kt – B3 Kt – Q5
 2. P – QB4 P – K3 22. Q × P Kt × B (ch)
 3. Kt – QB3 Kt – KB3 23. P × Kt R – Kt sq
 4. B – B4 B – K2 24. Q × P R – Kt3
 5. P – K3 Castles 25. Q – B4 R × P
 6. R – B sq P – B4 26. P – KR4 B – R2
 7. QP × P B × P 27. B – K4 Q – Q3
 8. P × P P × P 28. P – B4 Q – Q2
 9. Kt – B3 Kt – B3 29. B – Kt2 Q – Kt5
10. B – Q3 P – Q5 30. Q – Q3 Kt – B4
11. P × P Kt × P 31. Kt – K4 B – K6
12. Castles B – KKt5 32. R – B3 R × B
13. Kt – QKt5   B × Kt 33. K × R Kt × P (ch)
14. P – B Kt – K3 34. K – R2 Kt × R (ch)
15. B – K5 Kt – R4 35. K – Kt2 Kt – R5 (ch)
16. K – R sq Q – Kt4 36. K – R2 Kt – B4
17. B – Kt3 QR – Q sq 37. R – QKt sq P – R4
18. Q – B2 Q – R3 38. R – Kt5 R – R sq
19. QR – Q sq R – B sq 39. P – R3 R × P
20. Q – Kt3 P – R3 Resigns.  

This game was played in the St Petersburg tournament, 1895, a fine specimen of Lasker’s style. The final attack, beginning with 21. with Kt – Q5, furnishes a gem of an ending.

Rice Gambit.

White.
Professor Rice.
Black.
 Major Hanham. 
White.
Professor Rice.
Black.
Major Hanham.
 1. P – K4 P – K4 15. Q – R3 Kt – B7
 2. P – KB4 P × P 16. R × B (ch) B – K3
 3. Kt – KB3 P – KKt4 17. K – B sq Q – R8 (ch)
 4. P – KR4 P – Kt5 18. Kt – Kt sq Kt – R6
 5. Kt – K5 Kt – KB3 19. P × Kt P – B6
 6. B – B4 P – Q4 20. B – Kt5 Q – Kt7 (ch)
 7. P × P B – Q3 21. K – K sq P – B7 (ch)
 8. Castles B × Kt 22. K – Q2 P – B8=Kt (ch)
 9. R – K sq Q – K2 23. K – Q3 K – Q2
10. P – B3 P – Kt6 24. P × B (ch) K – B2
11. P – Q4 Kt – Kt5 25. Q – K7 (ch) K – Kt3
12. Kt – Q2 Q × P 26. Q – Q8 (ch) R × Q
13. Kt – B3 Q – R3 27. B × Q and mates  
14. Q – R4 (ch)   P – B3

The Rice Gambit (so called after its inventor, Prof. Isaac L. Rice of New York), whether right or not, is only possible if Black plays 7. B – Q3. Paulsen’s 7. B – Kt2 is better, and avoids unnecessary complications. 8. P – Q4 is the usual move. Leaving the knight en prise, followed by 9. R – K sq, constitutes the Rice Gambit. The interesting points in the game are that White subjects himself to a most violent attack with impunity, for in the end Black could not save the game by 22. P – B8 claiming a second queen with a discovered check, nor by claiming a knight with double check, as it is equally harmless to White.

Giuoco Piano.

White.
Steinitz.
Black.
 Bardeleben. 
White.
Steinitz.
Black.
Bardeleben.
 1. P – K4 P – K4 14. R – K sq P – KB3
 2. Kt – KB3   Kt – QB3 15. Q – K2 Q – Q2
 3. B – B4 B – B4 16. QR – B sq P – B3
 4. P – B3 Kt – B3 17. P – Q5 P × P
 5. P – Q4 P × P 18. Kt – Q4 K – B2
 6. P × P B – Kt5 (ch) 19. Kt – K6 KR – QB sq
 7. Kt – B3 P – Q4 20. Q – Kt4 P – KKt3
 8. P × P KKt × P 21. Kt – Kt5 (ch)   K – K sq
 9. Castles B – K3 22. R × Kt (ch) K – B sq
10. B – KKt5 B – K2 23. R – B7 (ch) K – Kt sq
11. B × Kt QB × B 24. R – Kt7 (ch) K – R sq
12. Kt × B Q × Kt 25. R × P (ch) Resigns.
13. B × B Kt × B

As a matter of fact, Bardeleben left the board here, and lost the game by letting his clock run out the time-limit; but Steinitz, who remained at the board, demonstrated afterwards the following variation leading to a forced win:—

White.
Steinitz.
Black.
 Bardeleben. 
White.
Steinitz.
Black.
Bardeleben.
25. . . . . . . K – Kt sq 31. Q – Kt8 (ch) K – K2
26. R – Kt7 (ch)   K – R sq 32. Q – B7 (ch) K – Q sq
27. Q – R4 (ch) K × R 33. Q – B8 (ch) Q – K sq
28. Q – R7 (ch) K – B sq 34. Kt – B7 (ch) K – Q2
29. Q – R8 (ch) K – K2 35. Q – Q6 mate.  
30. Q – Kt7 (ch) K – K sq

This game was awarded the prize for “brilliancy” at the Hastings tournament, 1895.