Page:Fables by La Fontaine translated by Elizur Wright.djvu/17

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PREFACE TO THE PRESENT EDITION

THE DOG AND CAT.

A dog and cat, messmates for life,
Were often falling into strife,
Which came to scratching, growls, and snaps
And spitting in the face, perhaps.
A neighbour dog once chanced to call
Just at the outset of their brawl.
And, thinking Tray was cross and cruel,
To snarl so sharp at Mrs. Mew-well,
Growled rather roughly in his ear.
'And who are you to interfere?'
Exclaimed the cat, while in his face she flew;
And, as was wise, he suddenly withdrew.


It seems, in spite of all his snarling.
And hers, that Tray was still her darling.


THE GOLDEN PITCHER.

A father once, whose sons were two,
For each a gift had much ado.
At last upon this course he fell;
'My sons,' said he, 'within our well
Two treasures lodge, as I am told:
The one a sunken piece of gold,—
A bowl it may be, or a pitcher;
The other is a thing far richer.
These treasures if you can but find.
Each may be suited to his mind;
For both are precious in their kind.