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Page:Folk-lore - A Quarterly Review. Volume 17, 1906.djvu/240

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2 26 Collectanea.

trousers, and close to the ground others serve for his stockings and shoes. The Bodach being thus attired, the players gather round him and sing with an air of affection :

" Bodach beag bideach, Nach sliob sibh a cheann, Tha e cho min ris an siod, Nach sliob sibh a cheann."

During the singing of these lines they smooth with the palms of their hands the head-rags, as if smoothing the Bodach's hair. This done, they sing :

"Nighidh mis' aodann, 'S ciridh mis' a cheann, Bodach beag bideach, Nach sliob sibh a cheann."

With the singing of these lines they imitate the washing of his face, combing his hair and smoothing his head as before. This finished, the song proceeds :

" Sguraidh mis' a lein, Nach sliob sibh a cheann, 'S sguraidh mis' a bhriogais, Nach sliob sibh a cheann."

With this verse they remove the shirt and thereafter the breeches, and imitate the scouring of these garments, smoothing the head as before. They then proceed :

" Sguraidh mis' a stocaidh, Nach sliob sibh a cheann, 'S glanaidh mis' a bhrogan, Nach sliob sibh a cheann."

The rags representing the foot-wear are removed the while, the stockings scoured and the shoes brushed, the smoothing of the head being still continued, till suddenly the affectionate atten- tion displayed changes into the most marked detestation; the Bodach is knocked down, trod on and kicked about in the most unmerciful manner, which finishes the game. The Gaelic verses may be translated :

I. Little insignificant old man, / Will you not smooth his head?/ It is as soft as silk, / Will you not smooth his head? / 2. I shall