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THE CONTENTS OF THE BOX
 
Table Showing The Male Descendants Of
 
HENRI d'ARTIN
Henri Francois Placide d'Artin, died Aug. 28, 1572.
Bartholomew Pasquier (son of above, died 1609.
Bartholomew Placide Pasquier killed in wars of the Fronde. Sons of above.
Henri Louis John (brother to above, died 1654.
Francois Rene Xavier de Pasquier (ennobled), killed 1650.
Francois Rene Alois de Pasquier, fled to America. Supposed to have been killed about 1681. No known descendants. Well known to the Cure of St. Martin's, Quebec.
and of
PEDRO ORTEZ.
Pedro d'Ortez, suicided 1604.
Charles Pedro, killed by Raoul 1602. Sons of above.
Raoul, died 1618.
Charles Francis Peter (son of Raoul, died without issue.
Pedro d'Ortez (brother to above, died 1663
Henry (son of above), killed in battle.
Alphonze, killed in battle. Sons of above.
Felix, died in infancy.
Raoul Armand Xavier d'Ortez, born 1641 (myself.) Died —. No children.
She who was born my daughter I disowned, and she died without issue.


It appeared that the only thing to be done was to visit the good Cure of St. Martin's, and, enlisting him in the search, find whatever descendants might have been left by this Francois Rene Alois de Pasquier. The task need not be a difficult one, as many old people should still be living who might have known of the man.[1]

I now bethought me of this enterprise as a fair excuse whereby I could leave Biloxi for a space. I would, therefore, call upon my old friend, and having obtained leave, matters now being safe with the colony, make the journey to Quebec.

But, alas for the weakness of fallen humanity; my last act before putting myself out of temptation's way was to run full tilt into it.

While this came so near to causing my dishonourable death, yet it was, under Divine Providence, the direct means of spreading before me a long life of happiness

  1. A very slight investigation showed that this last named Francois Rene Alois de Pasquier was none other than my own good father, who assumed the name de Mouret to avoid the consequences of a fatal duel in France. This I learned from the pious Cure of St. Martin's, who knew him well.