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334

HARVARD LA W RE VIE W.

[It will be remembered that the three years' course went into opera- tion in 1877-78.]

It is/' as is pointed out in Professor Langdell's report^ only in . . . graduates of Harvard College that the School has had any growth during the last eighteen years in respect to the number of students who have entered it. In that class the growth has undoubtedly been great, but yet not greater than the classes in Harvard College."

The graduates of other colleges *'who have entered the School dur- ing the last eighteen years have come from no less than one hundred and twenty-four different colleges, no one of which has sent an average of three in each year, and only one of which (Yale) has sent an aver- age of two in each year. ... It seems pretty clear . . . that the number of students coming to the School from other colleges has diminished since the establishment of the three years' course, but it also seems probable that the lowest point has been reached, and that now an improvement is going on."

The non-graduates " who have entered the School during the last eigh- teen years have come from forty-four different States or countries, while no one State or country, except Massachusetts, has furnished an average of three in each year, and only two besides Massachusetts (namely. New York and Ohio) have furnished an average of two in each year. Massachusetts has furnished an average of twelve in each year." The figures seem to show that the number ... has been gradually diminishing ever since the establishment of the three years' course and the examination for admission." • . .

"The years 1886-87 and 1887-88 have been distinguished for a large increase in the total number of students entering the school, the num- ber having risen from 88 in 1885-86, to 113 in 1886-87 (an increase of 25), and to 134 in 1887-88 (an increase of 21). . . . In the now current year, the total number of new entries is less by 2 1 than at the corresponding date of 1887-88." [This decrease, it is pointed out, is chiefly in the number of non-graduates entering the School. The large number (52) of such entries in 1887-88 seems to have been entirely "abnormal."]

" The greatest as well as the most important growth that the School has had during the last eighteen years in undoubtedly to be found, not in the number of students who have entered the School, but in the length ot time that students have remained in it ; and in this latter par- ticular the current year is not disappointing ; for the falling off in new entries is more than made up by an increased number of old students, the total number appearing in the annual catalogue for 1887-88 being 215, while the total number to appear in the annual catalogue of the current year will be 217."

In the nine years since the Law School honor degree was estab- lished, from 1879-80 to 1887-88, inclusive, it has been granted to only 65 students.*

> President's Report, p. 94.