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Page:History of Architecture in All Countries Vol 1.djvu/442

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410
Part II.
ROMANESQUE ARCHITECTURE.


NINTH CENTURY.


SS. Nereo ed Achilleo Leo III about 800

S. Praxede Paschal 1 820

S. Makia in Dominica 820

S. Martino ai Monti Sergius and Leo 844, 855

S. Nicolo in Carcere about 900

S. Bartolomeo in Isola 900


TENTH CENTURY.


S. Giovanni in Latekano Rebuilt by Sergius III. 910


ELEVENTH CENTURY.


Nothing.


{{c|TWELFTH CENTURY.


S. Clemente Paschal 1118

S. Maria in Trastevere Innocent II. 1135

S. Croce Lucius 1144

S. Maria in Ara Celi uncertain


THIRTEENTH CENTURY.


Nothing.


FOURTEENTH CENTURY.


S. Maria sopra Minerva Gothic about 1370


FIFTEENTH CENTURY.


S. Agostino Renaissance? about 1480


Three of these, St. Peter's, St. Paul's, and the Lateran church, have five aisles, all the rest three, with only one insignificant exception, Sta. Balbina, which has no side-aisles. Two, Sta. Agnese and the old part of St. Lorenzo, have their side-aisles in two stories, all the rest are only one story in height, and the side-aisles generally are half the width of the central aisle or nave. Some of the more modern churches have the side-aisles vaulted, but of those in the list all except these two last have flat wooden ceilings over the central compartment, and generally speaking the plain unornamental construction of the roof is exposed. It can scarcely be doubted that originally they were ceiled in some more ornamental manner, as the art of ornamenting this new style of open construction seems to have been introduced at a later date.

Of the two last-named, the Sta. Maria sopra Minerva might perhaps be more properly classed among the buildings belonging to the Italian Gothic style; but as it is the only one in Rome that has any claim to such a distinction, it is hardly worth while making it an exception to the rest. The San Agostino might also be called a Renaissance specimen. It certainly is a transitional specimen between the pillared and pilastered styles, which were then struggling for mastery. It may either be regarded as the last of the old race or the first of the new style, which was so soon destined to revolutionize the architectural world.