Page:Kwaidan; Stories and Studies of Strange Things - Hearn - 1904.djvu/140

This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.

with each other; and then Minokichi asked O-Yuki to rest awhile at his house. After some shy hesitation, she went there with him; and his mother made her welcome, and prepared a warm meal for her. O-Yuki behaved so nicely that Minokichi's mother took a sudden fancy to her, and persuaded her to delay her journey to Yedo. And the natural end of the matter was that Yuki never went to Yedo at all. She remained in the house, as an "honorable daughter-in-law."

O-Yuki proved a very good daughter- in-law. When Minokichi’s mother came to die, —some five years later, — her last words were words of affection and praise for the wife of her son. And O-Yuki bore Minokichi ten chil- dren, boys and girls, — handsome children all of them, and very fair of skin.

The country-folk thought O-Yuki a wonderful person, by nature different from themselves. Most of the peasant-women age early; but O-Yuki, even after having become the mother of ten children, looked as young and fresh as on the day when she had first come to the village.

One night, after the children had gone to sleep, O-Yuki was sewing by the light

116