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Page:Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management.djvu/1003

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RECIPES FOR PASTRY

ceedingly light and easily-digested pudding, but in consequence of extreme lightness it is liable to break if turned out of the basin.

Time.— ¼ of an hour. Average Cost, 5d. Sufficient for 1 fair sized pudding.

1671.—SUET CRUST.

Ingredients.—12 ozs. of flour, 6 ozs. of suet, 1 teaspoonful of baking-powder, ¼ teaspoonful of salt, ⅓ of a pint of water.

Method.—Chop the suet finely with a little of the flour, mix it with the other dry ingredients, and add water to form a moderately stiff paste. Roll out and use at once. This paste is equally suitable for meat pudding, jam roly-poly, or plain suet pudding.

Time.—¼ of an hour. Average Cost, 5d. Sufficient for 1 large pudding.

1672.—SUET CRUST FOR MEAT PIES.

Ingredients.—12 ozs. of flour, 6 ozs. of suet, 1 heaped teaspoonful of baking-powder, ¼ of a teaspoonful of salt, ⅓ pint of cold water.

Method.—Free the suet from skin, shred it into fine flakes, but do not chop it. Add the flour to the suet, and mix both well together in a basin, then add the salt, baking-powder, and as much water as is necessary to mix the whole into a fairly stiff paste. Knead lightly, then roll out, and use for any kind of pie intended to be eaten hot.

Time.—¼ of an hour. Average Cost, 5d. Sufficient for 1 large pie.

1673.—SWEET PASTE FOR TARTLETS. (Fr.Pâte à Foncer Sucré.)

Ingredients.—1 lb. of fine flour, 8 ozs. of castor sugar, 5 ozs. of butter, 3 eggs, the finely-grated rind of lemon.

Method.—Sieve the flour into a basin, make a well in the centre, put in the sugar, butter and eggs, and mix the whole into a stiff paste. Roll out and use as required.

Time.—10 minutes Average Cost, 1s.

1674.—TO GLAZE PASTRY.

Meat pies, patties, sausage-rolls, and similar articles, are usually brushed over with well-beaten egg before, or during the process of baking: when a deeper tone of colour is desired the yolk alone is used. Or, when economy is a point, and the white can be otherwise utilized, a little milk may be added to the yolk of egg when a larger quantity than is afforded by 1 yolk is required. Fruit tarts, puffs, etc., are usually brushed lightly over with cold water, and sprinkled liberally with castor