Open main menu

Page:Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management.djvu/1316

This page has been validated.
1174
HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT

2645.—MUSHROOMS, PICKLED.

Ingredients.—1 quart of button mushrooms, 1 quart of vinegar, 1 oz. of bruised whole ginger, ½ an oz. of white peppercorns, 3 blades of mace, salt to taste.

Method.—Wash, dry, and peel the mushrooms, and cut off the tops of the stalks. Place them in a stewpan, sprinkle salt over them, shake them over the fire until the liquor flows, and keep them on the stove uncovered until the greater part of the moisture has evaporated. Then add the vinegar, peppercorns, etc., bring to the boil, and simmer gently for 10 minutes. Turn into jars, cover closely, and store in a cool, dry place.

Average Cost.—1s. 10d. to 2s. 6d.

2646.—MUSHROOMS, PICKLED. (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—1 quart of button mushrooms, 1 quart of vinegar, 1 oz. of whole ginger, ½ an oz. of white peppercorns, a good pinch of cayenne.

Method.—Cut off the tips of the stalks, rub off the outer skin with a piece of new flannel occasionally dipped in salt, rinse the mushrooms in salt and water, and dry them well. Boil the vinegar, pepper and spices together until pleasantly seasoned and flavoured, then put in the mushrooms and simmer them gently for 10 minutes. Put into jars; when cold cover closely, and store in a cool, dry place.

Average Cost.—1s. 10d. to 2s. 6d.

2647.—NASTURTIUM SEEDS, PICKLED.

Ingredients.—Nasturtium seeds, vinegar to cover them. To each pint of vinegar add ½ an oz. of salt, 6 peppercorns.

Method.—Boil the vinegar, salt and peppercorns together, and, when cold, strain it into a wide-necked bottle. Gather the seeds on a dry day, put them into the vinegar, and cork closely. These pickled seeds form an excellent substitute for capers. They are ready for use in about 3 months, but may be kept for a much longer time.

Nasturtiums. The elegant nasturtium-plant, called by botanists Tropaeolum, and which sometimes goes by the name of Indian cress—an American climbing annual with bright orange-coloured flowers—came originally from Peru, but was easily acclimatized in these islands. Its young leaves and flowers are of a slightly hot nature, and many consider them a good adjunct to salads, to which they certainly add a pretty appearance. When the beautiful blossoms, which may be employed with great effect in garnishing dishes, are off, then the fruit is used as described in the above recipe.

2648.—ONIONS, PICKLED.

Ingredients.—1 gallon of pickling onions, salt and water, milk. To each ½ gallon of vinegar add 1 oz. of bruised ginger, ¼ of a teaspoonful of cayenne, 1 oz. of allspice, 1 oz. of whole black popper, ¼ of an oz. of whole nutmeg bruised, and cloves, ¼ of an oz. of mace.