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Page:Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management.djvu/1490

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HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT

3094.—EGG SANDWICHES.

Ingredients.—Hard-boiled eggs, thin slices of either white or brown bread and butter, cress or parsley.

Method.—Cut the eggs into thin slices, place them between slices of bread and butter, trim off the crusts, and cut into triangles. Garnish with tufts of cress or parsley.

Time.—To boil the eggs, from 10 to 12 minutes. Average Cost, 1d. each. Allow 6 eggs for 4 or 5 persons.

3095.—EGGS AND TOMATOES (COLD).

Ingredients.—Fresh eggs, firm tomatoes, croûtes of fried or toasted bread, salt and pepper, salad.

Method.—Cut a slice off the end of each tomato, scoop out some of the pulp, and season the inside of the tomatoes with salt and pepper. Into each one carefully break an egg, put on the lids, and bake in a moderately hot oven until the eggs are set. When cold, serve garnished with salad.

Time.—From 10 to 15 minutes, to bake the tomatoes. Average Cost, 3½d. to 4d. each. Sufficient, allow 1 to each person.

3096.—FORCEMEAT FRITTERS.

Ingredients.—8 ozs. of soft breadcrumbs, 3 ozs. of butter, 2 eggs, ¼ of a pint of cream, 1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped leek or onion, 1 teaspoonful of finely-chopped or powdered mixed herbs, 2 hard-boiled eggs sliced and fried in oil or butter, salt, pepper.

Method.—Rub the butter into the breadcrumbs, add the parsley, leeks, herbs, and a seasoning of salt and pepper. Stir in the eggs and cream, shape into balls, and fry in hot butter or oil in a frying pan. Serve garnished with the fried slices of egg, and add brown sauce and red-currant jelly.

Time.—About ½ an hour. Average Cost, 1s. 2d. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

3097.—GLOBE ARTICHOKES. (See. Artichoke Salad, No. 3085. Also Recipes Nos. 1435-1443.)

3098.—LAVER, TO DRESS.

Ingredients.—1 or 2 pats of laver-weed, 1 oz. of butter, lemon juice, salt, pepper, buttered toast.

Method.—The laver-weed, a variety of seaweed found principally on the South Wales coast, is collected at low tide, well washed in seawater, and afterwards boiled in slightly salted water. In winter it