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Page:Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management.djvu/2100

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1890
HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT

CAMPHORATED SPIRITS OF WINE

(Useful as an Embrocation for Sprains, Rheumatism, Chilblains, etc.")

Dissolve 1 oz. of camphor in a pint of rectified spirits of wine. Keep well corked down.

TO TREAT A CUT

To promote rapid healing the essential thing is to make the wound and surrounding skin absolutely clean by washing thoroughly with pure soap and hot water. When clean, rinse in fresh water and carbolic lotion (carbolic acid 2 teaspoonfuls; water 1 tumblerful), if available. Then apply a firm bandage of clean old linen rag. If the bleeding from a cut is profuse, a few turns of bandage firmly applied over the bleeding part will stop it until medical assistance arrives.

TO CURE A COLD

(A most Efficacious and Simple Remedy for a Severe Cold in the Head)

Take a small basin, put into it boiling water and strong camphorated spirit, in the proportion of 1 teaspoonful of spirit to ½ a pint of water. Wring out a sponge in this as hot as possible, and apply it to the nose and mouth; draw in the steam with the nose first and then with the mouth; swallow the steam, and, to prevent any escape, cover the head with a flannel. Continue this treatment for several minutes, having another hot sponge ready when the first gets cool. Sponges so wrung out in the same mixture may with great benefit be applied outwards to the throat and chest.

Camphorated sal-volatile is a good medicine for a cold, 30 drops in a wineglass of warm water several times in the course of the day.

TO APPLY A BLISTER

Wash the skin with soap and water, warm the blister at the fire and lay it on, leaving it there for seven hours or more till it rises. Snip the bladder then formed with sharp-pointed scissors to let the water out, then dress with ointment spread upon lint. The ointment should always be spread on the smooth surface of the lint.

TO APPLY LEECHES

Wash the skin thoroughly, rinse and dry, and then nib over with a little milk. Should they not bite at once put a spot of blood obtained by a slight prick of the finger on the place. When filled they usually roll off; but if it is necessary to detach them they must not be pulled, but a little salt must be shaken over them, which will make them release their hold. Should too much bleeding follow, apply a little powdered alum.