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Page:Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management.djvu/567

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RECIPES FOR COOKING BEEF

Time.—1 hour to cook. Average Cost, about 2s. 6d. to 3s. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

NOTE.—Sausage meat may be used instead of forcemeat in preparing this dish.

830.—BEEF ROLLS OR OLIVES. (Another Method.)

Ingredients.—1½ lb. of rump steak, veal forcemeat (see Forcemeats), ¾ of a pint of stock or water, 1½ ozs. of butter, 1 oz. of flour, 1 small onion sliced, a few slices of carrot, salt and pepper.

Method.—Prepare, stuff, and bind the olives as in the preceding recipe. Heat the butter in a stewpan, fry the olives until their entire surface is lightly browned, then remove them from the stewpan. Now put in the carrot and onion, fry quickly for 3 or 4 minutes, then sprinkle in the flour, fry brown, pour in the stock, and stir until boiling. Replace the olives in the stewpan, add salt and pepper, cover with a greased paper and the lid of the stewpan, and simmer slowly for 1½ hours. Remove the strings, dish the olives on a bed of mashed potato, season the sauce to taste, and strain it over them.

Time.—About 2 hours. Average Cost, 2s. to 2s. 4d. Sufficient for 6 or 7 persons.

831.—BEEF, RIB BONES OF.

Ingredients.—Rib bones, 1 carrot, 1 turnip, 1 onion finely chopped, ¼ of a pint of good gravy, salt and pepper, mashed potato.

Method.—The bones should have on them a slight covering of meat. Peel the carrot and turnip, scoop out small pea shapes with a special cutter, or, if more convenient, cut them into dice. Saw the bones into pieces 3 inches long, place them in a stewpan with the turnip, carrot and onion, add the gravy, and season to taste. Stew very gently until the vegetables are tender, and serve piled within a border of mashed potato.

Time.—About ¾ of an hour. Average Cost, exclusive of the bones, 4d. Seasonable at any time.

832.—BEEFSTEAK, GRILLED

Ingredients.—1½ lb. of steak cut off the fillet, rump, sirloin or tenderloin, ½ oz. of butter, salt and pepper.

Method.—Grilling is a very simple process in cookery, the success of which depends almost entirely upon the fire being clear bright and free from smoke. A handful of salt will assist in clearing the fire; it should be sprinkled on the top a few minutes before required for