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Page:Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management.djvu/611

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RECIPES FOR COOKING BEEF

about 2 hours. When done, have ready the dice or strips of vegetables boiled until tender in salted water, and the fat of the meat fried and nicely browned. Arrange the pieces of steak neatly on a hot dish, strain the sauce over, place the fat on the top, and garnish the base with groups of the prepared vegetables.

Time.—From 2¼ to 2½ hours. Average Cost, 1s. 4d. to 1s. 6d. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

931.—TENDERLOIN OF BEEF.

Ingredients.—A thick slice off a well-hung sirloin, salad-oil or oiled butter, salt and pepper.

Method.—Brush the meat on both sides with salad-oil or oiled butter, grill over a clear fire until done, turning two or three times, and repeatedly brush it over with oil or butter. Season with salt and pepper, and serve with fried potatoes and Maître d'Hôtel butter, or any other accompaniments preferred.

Time.—10 to 15 minutes, according to thickness. Average Cost, 1s. 2d. to 1s. 4d. per lb.

932.—TOAD-IN-THE-HOLE.

Ingredients.—1 lb. of beef steak (cut up small), 4 ozs. of flour, ½ a pint of milk, 1 egg, salt, dripping.

Method.—Mix the flour, milk, egg, and a little salt into a smooth batter. Put into a Yorkshire pudding tin sufficient dripping to form a thin layer when melted, pour in about ¼ of the batter, and bake until set. Then add the meat, season it with salt and pepper, pour in the remainder of the batter, bake quickly until it has risen and set, and then more slowly until sufficiently cooked. Serve in squares arranged neatly overlapping each other on a hot dish.

Time.—To bake, about 1 hour. Average Cost, 1s. 3d. to 1s. 5d. Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons. Seasonable at any time.

933.—TONGUE BOILED. (Fr.Langue de Bœuf.)

Ingredients.—1 tongue, a bunch of savoury herbs, water.

Method.—In choosing a tongue, ascertain how long it has been dried or pickled, and select one with a smooth skin, which denotes its being young and tender. If a dried one, and rather hard, soak it at least for 12 hours previous to cooking it; if, however, the tongue is fresh from the pickle, 2 or 3 hours will be sufficient for it to remain in soak. Put the tongue into a stewpan with plenty of cold water and a bunch of savoury herbs, let it gradually come to a boil, skim well, and simmer very gently until tender. Peel off the skin, garnish with tufts of cauliflowers or Brussels sprouts, and serve. Boiled tongue is frequently