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Page:New observations on inoculation - Angelo Gatti.djvu/65

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On the TREATMENT.

Neither this comparison, however, nor all my preceding reasonings, would so strongly convince me of the truth and utility of the rule before us, as the facts which I have been witness to.

I have seen children in the first period, left to themselves in bed, suffering all the anxieties of this state; and at once have observed all their ills to vanish, as soon as their attention was drawn off to an amusing tale, or to a pleasing toy. This amendment was still more perfect if they were taken up, and enticed to walk about, to dance, to play, and if moderate exercise was added to the recreation of the mind. I aver that, whenever I have managed my inoculated patients in this manner, by keeping them out of bed, and contriving to divert and keep them in constant motion, they have slipped through this period, and hardly have known they were sick. I will not take upon me to determine whether this efficacy of exercise, during that period, is altogether owing to the diversion of the mind, to its increasing and facilitating the secretions, or to any other cause; but certain it is, that it constantly gives relief, and never has any bad effect.

It is easy to divert and amuse children; but how to manage with grown people, is by far a more difficult task. They require more interesting objects, and the choice can only be determined by the knowledge of their taste, and by particular circumstances. In general, one may recommend any moderate exercise attended with some diversion of the mind; such as

walking,
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