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Page:Notes and Queries - Series 10 - Volume 12.djvu/472

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388


NOTES AND QUERIES. [io s. XIL NOV. 13, im


learn the titles of any pamphlets or books written by him. Is any portrait of him known ? Will some correspondent kindly send me an exact transcription (as to letter- ing and spacing) of the inscription on tomb- stone in aisle of St. Margaret's, Westminster ? I am familiar with Bevan's ' History of St. David's,' and no portrait is known at the Palace, Abergwili.

(Miss) CHARLOTTE SIMPSON. Sandholm, Shorey Bank, Burnley.

LAMBPARK : " ONE LAMPTE." Lambpark is the name of a seven-acre field adjoining the glebe of Honiton, Devon. A quota- tion by Miss LEGA-WEEKES, ante, p. 346, suggests an etymology of the name which is novel to me, and I should like to ask for further information. That quotation is from a report of the year 1564-5, and con- tains the phrase : " one pece of ground called moarte parke, containing v acres .... geven to the maintenance of one lampte with morte." May I also ask for references as to the full meaning of " one lampte " ?

J. P. B.

Savile Club, W.

FILBERTS : " WHEN THE DEVIL GOES A-NTJTTING." In a facetious letter from Gervas Pigot (circa 1663-4), on the subject of a ' Key to Hudibras ' occurs the following sentence :

" It daf arridere no less than deridere, and so tickles their itching eares, that they cannot forbear scratching : in so much that I am almost of a beliefe the author had a design upon the presbiterian Luggs, to make them the verry scabbs of y e church, w ch (to save the pillory the labor) at y e next religious meeting when y e holy Sisters shall breath y m selves out into auricular confession, might fall off of them- selves as filberts do from there [sic] husks about Holyrood day, when the Divell ('tis said) goes a Nutting."

Is anything known of this legend ?

J. ELIOT HODGKIN.

ST. BERNARD DOGS IN ENGLAND. I am collecting information on the early history of the St. Bernard dog in this country, and should be glad of information on the following points.

The anonymous author of ' A Tour to Great St. Bernard's and Round Mont Blanc ' (London, 8vo, 1827), in describing the dogs at the hospice, says : "I saw one of these dogs in London at the place where the models of Switzerland were exhibited." When and where was this exhibition held ? In what book or periodical is it described ?

A St. Bernard dog called " L'Ami " was imported in 1829, and " was exhibited in both London and Liverpool to many


thousand people at the charge of one shilling admission." His picture was lithographed by " Mr. Clarke of Holborn " (' Richardson : Dogs, their Origin and Varieties,' 1847.) I want a reference to an account of this exhibition. Who was "Mr. Clarke" ?

Where can I find an account of the dog exhibited by Albert Smith at the Egyptian Hall in 1852 ? PERCY MANNING.

6, St. Aldate's, Oxford.

REV. HENRY MORRIS OF BURNLEY, 1640-53. Particulars are desired of the earlier life of this minister parentage, college, whom he married, and names of his appointments. Was he Welsh ? He was from 1640 to 1653 minister of Burnley Parish Church, Lanes, and died there at the latter date. MARYLEBONE.

PARISH REGISTERS BEFORE 1538. Where can I find information on parish registers previous to Henry VIII.'s order of 1538 ? JOHN HAUTENVILLE COPE.

18, Harrington Court, S.W.

[Try Mr. A. M. Burke's * Key to Ancient Parish Registers.']

THE YEW IN POETRY. I should be grateful if readers of ' N. & Q.' could tell me where I can find the three following quotations : |te.fifiBfJEii)k^.lb.atf'lftlf'^ -

1. The Druid grove, where many a reverend yew j Hides from the thirsty beam the moontide dew.

2. Lonely and huge, the giant yew, , , - As champion to his country true, '~ . ^ j Stands forth to guard the rearward post,

The bulwark of the scattered host.

3. What scenes have passed since first this ancient

yew

In all the strength of youthful beauty grew !

Here patriot Barons might have musing stood,

And plann'd the Charter for their country's good, &c.

The first two quotations have been attributed to Sir James Mackintosh, and the last to Fitzgerald ; but I have failed to trace them, though I have hunted in volumes by James Mackintosh (with and without the title) and by Fitzgerald from Edward FitzGerald to the " Small beer poet."


s%." LIE " IN SCOTCH LEGAL DOCUMENTS. What is the significance of the letters, or couplet, " lie," used frequently in the following way in ancient documents in Scotland ? In a Latin title-deed, in giving names of places untranslatable into Latin, the scribe inserts the Scotch, prefixing " lie." Again, in a long enumeration you find it introducing a clause. Sometimes it seems to mean nothing particular beyond a breath-