Open main menu

Page:Notes and Queries - Series 12 - Volume 10.djvu/216

This page needs to be proofread.


174 NOTES AND QUERIES. [12 S. X. MAR. 4, 1922. 23. " Keep your Pecker up ; or Prometheus and the Vulture.' 24. ' Outside the Pale,' by Handel. 25. * The Fatal Blow,' by John Knox. 26. * Tall Tales,' by a Kidder. 27. ' The Air Apparent : a Tale of the London Fog.' 28. ' The Art of taking Notes,' by a Burglar. 29. 'A Vocabulary of British Oaths ' : a sequel to ' Bradsbaw's Railway Guide.' 30. ' The Window Smasher ; or the Man who saw Glasgow.' 31. ' After Death,' Watt. 32. ' The Disappointed Cabman ; or No Thoroughfare,' by Charles Dickens. 33. The Successful Burglar ; or Self Help,' by S. Smiles. 34. ' Infra Dig. ; or Ashamed to Beg.' 35. * The Circular Saw ; or Who saw the Cir- cular ? ' 36. Certain to Snore,' by the author of ' Per- chance to Dream.' 37. ' The Last Watch,' by George Atten- borough. 38. ' Vestments,' by Bishops Westcott. 39. ' What's in a Name ? ' Anon. 40. ' Heavenly Twins,' by the author of The Double Event.' 41. ' Exposed Cards,' by Miss Deal. 42. ' Thoughts on a Future State ; or The Musings of a Faded Wall Flower.' 43. ' The Garden of Sleep,' by a Collector of Church Sermons. 44. ' A Staunch Whig ; or How to Hide Bald- 45. ' La Chrymose,' by M. Thiere. 46. ' Reminiscences of Waterloo ' (with Plans), by a Visitor to Richmond. 47. ' Neck or Nothing,' by Walter Crane. 48. ' All Round my Hat, Ma ! ' by Annie B.'s Aunt. 49. ' Let us Pray,' by a Company Promoter. 50. ' Eavesdropping,' by Heard. 51. ' Thrice Blessed : a Tale of the Queen's Bounty.' . 52. ' Garden Hoe,' by Ouida. 53. ' A Life of Payne,' by Aikin. 54. 'On Home Rule,' by Lilian Bull. 55. ' Ann Chovey, or Toasts.' 56. 'A Counter Attraction ; or the Pretty Shopgirl.' . 57. The Triple Alliance ; or Thrtee a Bigamist.' 58. ' Who goes Home ? or the Martyrdom of St. Stephen's.' 59. ' The Entrance Out,' by U. R. Greene. 60. ' Cells,' by Warder. 61. ' Brigands and their Haunts,' originally published as A Handy Guide to the Hotels of Europe.' 62. ' The Mother's Dilemma ; or Which Daughter ? ' by Watson. 63. ' Tales of the Mint,' by Lamb. 64. ' A History of the Scalds,' by Robert Burns. 65. ' Boyle on the Neck.' 66. ' False better than True : a Tale of the last Decade,' by a Dentist. 67. * Punch, on the Head.' 68. * Our Pet Tragedian ; or a Pop'lar Tree.' ,.69. ' Hints on Golf,' by One of a Clique. WILLIAM BULL. An Editor's note to a query on the above in 11 S. iv. 230, says that a ' List of Imitation Book Backs ' was made by Dickens for Mr. Eeles in 1851 and can be seen in the edition of his letters published by Messrs. Macmillan, 1893, or in the National edition of his works, vol. 37, pp. 279-80. A long list of ' Sham Book Titles,' by Hood, will be found at 8 S. i. 63, 229 and 301. For other lists see 9 S. viii. 212 ; ix. 384, 432. ARCHIBALD SPARKE. " ANGLICA [OB RUSTIC A] GENS," &c. (10 S. ii. 405 ; 12 S. x. 95). Let me thank FAMA for this earlier example of the " Anglica " version of the line, which has now been shown to go back at least as far as 1558. But I can cap this with a much older specimen of the " Rustica " type. On p. 86 of Jakob Werner's ' Latein- ische Sprichworter und Sinnspriiche des Mittelalters aus Handschriften gesammelt,' Heidelberg, 1912, we find Rustica gens est optima flens, sed pessirna ridens. This is taken from a MS. in the University Library at Basel, which has been assigned to the fourteenth century, but which Werner judged to be of the early fifteenth. EDWARD BENSLY. " SATAN REPROVING SIN " (12 S. x. 130). The earliest instance of this saying at the above reference was dated 1721. But " The Devil rebukes sin " is in John Ray's ' Col- lection of English Proverbs,' p. 126, 2nd ed., 1678. Ray appends the Latin equiva- lent, Clodius accusat moechos. adapted from [si . . . ] Clodius accuset moechos. (Juvenal, Sat. ii. 27.) The passage in Juvenal beginning at line 24, Quis tulerit Gracchos de seditione querentes ? is certainly the locus classicus for the ex- pression in detail of the same thought as that in the English phrase. This latter could probably be traced to a much earlier date than Ray's. EDWARD BENSLY. HOUSE BELLS (12 S. ix. 190, 236). Mrs. Adams, on her arrival at the White House, Washington, in 1800, wrote : "' BeUs are wholly wanting, not one single one being hung through the whole house and promises are all you can obtain." See ' Walks about Washington,' by Francis E. Leupp and Lester Gr. Hornby (Boston : Little, Brown and Co., 1915). M.