Page:Notes and Queries - Series 12 - Volume 6.djvu/86

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NOTES AND QUERIES. [12 s. vi. MARCH, 1920.


MILLER'S ' GARDENER'S DICTIONARY.' Can any reader tell me where there is a copy of the very rare fifth edition of the above ? C. C. LACAITA.

Selham House, Petworth.

MARY JONES. There was issued in Oxford, 1750, a volume of Miscellanies in Prose and Verse by the aforesaid lady. Impartable information about her will oblige.

ANETJRIN WILLIAMS.

Menai View, North Road, Carnarvon.

ALFIERI'S TUTOR, 1766. Who was the English Catholic tutor under whose escort Vittorio Alfieri visited France, England, and Holland ? HARMATOPEGOS.

RICHARD DUDLEY, D.D. ; principal of St. Mary Hall, Oxford, in 1502, and prebendary of London, Lincoln, and York ; rector of Walton-on-the-Hill, West Derby, Lanes, 1506-28 ; died 1536. Any information of his ancestry or possible descendants would be appreciated. C. B. A.

CURIOUS SURNAMES. The three following instances are as notable as I have ever met with, all from this city : Gotobed, Strongith- arm, and Fullolove. Are such known elsewhere ? J. B. McGovERN.

St. Stephen's Rectory, C.-on-M., Manchester.

LETTER FROM THE KING (GEORGE IV.). Can any one give me information as to the authorship of ' A Letter from the King to his People,' written I presume on . the accession of George IV. in 1820, and attributed to Wasborough, and again to J. W. Croker. Who was Wasborough ?

ARCHIBALD SPARKE.

AUTHORS OF QUOTATIONS WANTED. 1. Can any of your readers tell me the author of the following lines ?

In the years fled, Lips that are dead Sang me that song.

W. GERALD HARDING.

2. When to the flowers so beautiful the Father

gave a name, Back came a little blue-eyed one all timidly it

came, And standing at its Father's feet, and gazing in His

face, It said in low and trembling tones, which fear made

come apace, " Dear God ! the name Thou gavest me, alas !

I have forgot."

And God looked down with kindliness, and said, "Forget me not ! "

Hie ET UBIQUE.

[This question appeared at 12 S. i. 228, but no reply was received.]


"WE FOUR FOOLS." (12 S. v. 316.)

IN further description of this picture I send the following details :

In the oil painting, the left figure has, on his right leg, above the knee, a pair of tongs and a poker, crossed ; below, a bell : on his left leg, above the knee, two fish ; below a pair of bellows. The central figure has cross-gartered pantaloons. The right figure has, on his right leg, above the knee, a grid- iron ; below, a mug with a lid : on his left leg, above the knee, three playing-cards, ace of clubs, five of spades, and three of diamonds. He is holding a fiddle and bow in his right hand, and a glass half-full of liquor in his left hand.

In the engraving, the left figure has, on his right leg, above the knee, apparently, two sausages ; below, two fish : on his left leg, above the knee, two fish, looking right and left ; below, apparently, two crossed sausages. The central figure has diagonal- lined pantaloons. The right figure has, on his right leg, above the knee, a mug. He is holding a metallic cup, and he is wearing heavily-rimmed spectacles.

Perhaps these details may interest, and draw observations, from some of your readers, whose attention I would draw particularly to the three cards.

LEES KNOWLES, Bt.

4 Park Street, W.I.

The correspondent to ' N. & Q.' who found the old Dutch print referred to as above has, I would suggest, got a variant of the " Picture of We Three " referred to by Shakespeare in ' Twelfth Night,' Act II. sc. iii. 17-21 (Furness,' Variorum Shaks,' p. 108) as follows :

Enter CLOWNE.

And. Heere conies the foole yfaith.

Clo. How now my hearts. Did you never see the Picture of we three ?

To. Welcome asse, now let's have a catch.

The notes in Furness' s edition are as follows :

" Henley : An allusion to an old print, some- times pasted on the wall of a country ale-house, representing two, but under which the spectator reads : ' We three are asses.' Douce : The original picture seems to have been two fools. Thus in Shirley's ' The Bird in a Cage,' Morello says : ' We be three of old, without exception to your lordship, only with this difference, I am the