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9"- S. IX. MARCH 22, 1902.] NOTES AND QUERIES.


221


LONDON, SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1902.


CONTENTS. No. 221.

NOTES : Coronation Peerages, 221 Shakespearian a, 222 The Japanese Regalia " Crossing the bar "Contem- poraries impersonated on the Stage "Galilee" Mrs. Siddoi's's House, 224" Kemp "Appeasing a Ghost O.P. Rfots, 226 Old School Rules Leman Sand " Pulque "Last of Pre-Victorian M.P.s, 226 Initial for Forename, 227.

QUERIES: John Laugh ton Scotch Church in London "Limberham" John King, Language Master, 1722- Star-lore, 227 Herbert's ' Flower '-Salt Folk-lore f'elts and Massagetae R Dodsley Pictorial Postcard s-Poul- trell Fashion in Language Brown Family, 228 Bast Wind in Welsh Italian Quotation Knockers' Llyn " Champigny " : " Buggy " Mat hews of Truro, 229.

REPLIES : Author and Avenger of Evil, 229 Christ's Hospital Harvest Bell Bibliography of the Bicycle, 231 Damsell Portraits of Lord Mayors Author Wanted " Barracked " FitzGerald Quotation Parentage of Caesar Borgia, 232" Intentions "Gordon Riots French Novel "Foot-cloth nag" "O saw ye my father," 233 Stoning the Wren Green Unlucky Fleet wood Minia- ture, 234 " Lurden " Sunflower Ornament, 235 Bar- bieri Oldest Borough in England, 23* Portraits of Joanna Baillie " As mad as a tup" Mummers Bible: Authorized Version, 237 Burial of a Suicide -Tennis Antinomian Sect Tib's Eve, 238 Carneddau Cross " Flittings "Bishops' Signatures, 239.

NOTES ON BOOKS :-Airy's ' Westminster '- Meakin's 4 The Moors.'

Notices to Correspondents.


CORONATION PEERAGES.

THE precedent as to the number of peerages created at the coronation of George IV. was strictly followed at that of William IV., and formed the basis of the creations made at that of Queen Victoria, when, however, the number was reduced by half, owing, presum- ably, to the quantity of peerages that would otherwise have thus been created within the short space of seventeen years, during which no fewer than three coronations occurred. It is therefore of some interest to set forth the statistics of these creations, more especially as, no peerages having been conferred at the coronation of George III. or George II., these three (being all that have taken place for nearly two hundred years) form practically the only precedents for the forthcoming coronation.

At the coronation of George IV., 14 July, 1821, there were twenty-two creations, six of which number (the Marquessate of Ailesbury and five earldoms) were bestowed on holders of hereditary peerages of Parliament, while sixteen (one viscountcy and fifteen baronies) were additions to the House of Lords ; of this sixteen, however, one half (two for Scot- land and six for Ireland) was bestowed on Scotch or Irish peers.

At the coronation of William IV., 8 Sep- tember, 1831, there were (as above) twenty-


two creations, five of which number (the Marquessates of Ailsa, Breadalbane, and West- minster, as also two earldoms) were bestowed on holders of hereditary peerages of Parlia- ment (two of them being also holders of Scotch earldoms), while seventeen (one earldom, con- ferred on the younger son of a duke, and six- teen baronies) were additions to the House of Lords ; of this seventeen, however, nearly one half (one for Scotland and six for Ireland) was bestowed on Scotch or Irish peers. The

  • ' promotion " (under the Act of Union) of

the Irish Viscountcy of Northland to the Irish Earldom of Ranfurly should, though not affecting the House of Lords, be reckoned also among the peerages then conferred.

At the coronation of Queen Victoria, 28. June, 1838, the creations were exactly half the number of those made at the two preceding ones, amounting only to eleven, three of which number (the Marquessate of Nor- manby and two earldoms) were bestowed on holders of hereditary peerages of Parliament, while eight (all of them baronies) were addi- tions to the House of Lords ; of this eight, however, one half (one for Scotland and three for Ireland) was bestowed on Scotch or Irish peers. A full account of the peerages conferred on these three occasions will be found in 'The Complete Peerage,' by G. E. C., vol. ii. pp. 351, 312, and 145.

An aole and most interesting article by Mr. J. H. Round entitled ' Coronation Peer- ages,' and dealing not only with the above, but with all previous ones, is in the Monthly Revieiv for February. From this it can be ascertained that the number of such creations at the earlier coronations was as under.

The number at that of George I., in 1714, was fourteen viz., eight (earldoms) bestowed on holders of hereditary peerages of Parliament and six (one viscountcy and five baronies) addi- tions to the House of Lords ; of this six, how- ever, no fewer than four were bestowed on Irish peers.

At the coronation of William and Mary, in 1689 (Queen Anne as well as her father James II. having refrained from corona- tion creations), the number (exclusive of the Irish Viscountcy of Hewett) was ten (two dukedoms, five earldoms, two viscount- cies, and one barony), six of which number were bestowed on holders of hereditary peerages of Parliament, while four were additions to the House of Lords, these four being (1) the Duke of Cumberland, brother-in-law to the Queen ; (2) the well- beloved Earl of Portland ; (3)ViscountSydney; and (4) Lord Cholmondeley, which last (as well as Lord Lumley, one of the two English visj