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NOTES OF THE MEXICAN WAR.

Yesterday afternoon Lieut.-Col. Loomis entered the city of Mexico from Vera Cruz. He brings a large train, accompanied by two hundred and fifty pack mules; also, Capt. Shoover's battery comes with the train.

Saturday, April 22, 1848.—To-day is the first anniversary of the surrender of the castle of Perote, the second Gibraltar.

Sunday, April 23, 1848.—This morning it is reported that the ten regiment bill has passed both houses and received the President's signature, and is now a law; and that the whole Volunteer division will be recalled from the United States service.

This evening, on dress parade, orders were read to us that Capt. Loeser, of the Second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, would be suspended from his rank of command for two months, and to forfeit all his pay and allowances during that time, for being present at a mutinous meeting in regard to the Massachusetts officers who wanted to buck and gag one of the guard for a trifling offence, and for this act some of the Second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers rotten-egged the Massachusetts officer in the presence of Capt. Loeser, who was held accountable for not suppressing it—in fact, Capt. Loeser (who hails from Reading, Pa.,) urging them to do it. (So he ought.)

Monday, April 24, 1848.—This morning it is currently reported that the Mexicans have a quorum at Queretaro.

This afternoon we were visited by a very hard rain, accompanied by thundering and lighting.

Tuesday, April 25, 1848.—This morning the peace stock is again in the field, and Lieut.-Col. Black told me that he thought we would be on our way home in about one month's time. He gave it as his own opinion.

Wednesday, April 26, 1848.—-This morning peace is again in our quarters. I am told that there is heavy betting in the city in its favor.

Thursday April 27, 1848.—This morning I paid a visit to Churubusco. Here is the National Guard-house, now guarded and occupied by us as a guard-house, and is nearly full of