Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 22.djvu/451

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THE AFRICAN IN THE UNITED STATES.

consideration that the census for 1880 was made under a new and improved law, and by enumerators who, as a body, were thoroughly qualified, ought to be considered as settling the matter, and placing the error at the door of the preceding census. It is to be observed, in passing, that if the error, as practically it does, bears equally against white and black alike, however the figures for the two races, taken absolutely, may vary from the truth, yet are they still a proximate guide, considered relatively, to the comparative rate of increase of the races.

 
(1.) (2.)
United States. Alabama.
White. Black. White. Black.
1830 to 1840 34 per cent. 23 per cent. 1830 to 1840 76 per cent. 114 per cent.
1840 to 1850 38 " 23 " 1840 to 1850 21 " 35 "
1850 to 1860 38 " 22 " 1850 to 1860 21 " 27 "
1860 to 1870 24 " 9 " 1860 to 1870 1 " loss. 8 "
1870 to 1880 29 " 34 " 1870 to 1880 27 " 26 "
 
(3.) (4.)
Arkansas. South Carolina.
White. Black. White. Black.
1830 to 1840 206 per cent. 332 per cent 1830 to 1840 12 per cent. 3 per cent.
1840 to 1850 111 " 133 " 1840 to 1850 6 " 17 "
1850 to 1860 98 " 133 " 1850 to 1860 6 " 5 "
1860 to 1870 11 " 9 " 1860 to 1870 12 "loss 1 "loss
1870 to 1880 63 " 72 " 1880 to 1880 35 " 45 "
 
(5.) (6.)
North Carolina. Mississippi.
White. Black. White. Black.
1830 to 1840 2 per cent. 1 per cent 1830 to 1840 155 per cent. 197 per cent.
1840 to 1850 14 " 17 " 1840 to 1850 64 " 57 "
1850 to 1860 14 " 14 " 1850 to 1860 19 " 40 "
1860 to 1870 7 " 8 " 1860 to 1870 8 " 112 "
1870 to 1880 28 " 36 " 1880 to 1880 25 " 47 "
 
(7.) (8.)
Louisiana. Georgia.
White. Black. White. Black.
1830 to 1840 77 per cent. 53 per cent 1830 to 1840 37 per cent. 28 per cent.
1840 to 1850 61 " 35 " 1840 to 1850 27 " 35 "
1850 to 1860 39 " 33 " 1850 to 1860 13 " 20 "
1860 to 1870 1 " 4 " 1860 to 1870 8 " 17 "
1870 to 1880 25 " 33 " 1880 to 1880 27 " 32 "

It is estimated that five per cent from the rate of gain for the entire Southern blacks, as by census for 1880, is a fair allowance for this error, making their real gain about thirty per cent. Yet, as an obvious consideration points to the conclusion that the blacks will for the future develop in the South under conditions more and more favorable, it is not unreasonable to think that, in subsequent decades, this five per cent will be regained.

That consideration is the more complete adjustment of the black man to his new surroundings. His comparative helplessness imme-