Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 22.djvu/655

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ICEBERGS AND FOG IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC.

EASTERN PASSAGES.

PSM V22 D655 Eastern passages of ships in the north atlantic.png

 

WESTERN PASSAGES.

PSM V22 D655 Western passages of ships in the north atlantic.png

*[1][2][3]

By the above tables the average hours of fog for each passage show a decrease in the eastern passages from seven hours forty-nine minutes in 1876 and ten hours thirty-two minutes in 1878, to three hours, and three hours and thirty-seven minutes in 1880 and 1881, and eighteen minutes in 1882; and between the sixtieth and fortieth meridians, the ice-region, from an average of seven hours eleven minutes in 1876 to one hour fifteen minutes in 1881, and an entire immunity from fog in 1882; for the western passages a decrease from an average of thirty-seven hours fifty-four minutes of each passage in 1876 to four hours fifty-nine minutes in 1881, and three hours sixteen minutes in 1882; while in crossing the ice-region the average is reduced from ten hours thirty-three minutes in 1876 to three hours thirty-three minutes in 1881, and an entire absence of fog in 1882.

Comparing the western passages via 43° latitude, 50° longitude (route No. 1), with the extreme southern passages (routes 4 and 5), the result is as follows:

  1. One passage, southern route (track No. 4).
  2. Two passages, southern route (track No. 4).
  3. One passage, southern route (track No. 4). Four passages, southern route (track No. 5).