Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 78.djvu/161

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157
IBSEN, EMERSON AND NIETZSCHE

conscious factor in the struggle as soon as he told him that there was such a struggle. As such a conscious factor he is certain to realize more and more that he is able to push the evolutionary process on only as a part of the social whole. It is the gregarious instinct in man that makes him the lord of the brute and civilized man the lord of the savage. So, while the biologist lessens the struggle for existence as a recognized factor in evolution, man nullifies it in organized society for those within the organization, and leaves it to work what havoc it will outside. This is on the way from individualism to socialism, and that is the way we are now going because of our new premises in religion and science and politics. Man, the single man, is to be steadily more and more, no doubt, but it is man in the collective whole that in this century is to croon over him as, in Ibsen's "Peer Gynt," Solveig at last croons over that poor wreck of self-realization gone mad. Peer Gynt himself:

I will cradle thee, I will watch thee;
Sleep and dream thou, dear my boy.