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Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 90.djvu/640

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624

��Popular Science Monthly

��Hurdle Races

���RIGHT WRONG

Front view of runner in good and bad form

��Hurdles are light obstacles placed at regular intervals on the track over which the runners must leap during the race. The standard distances, heights, and num- ber of hurdles are as follows:

In the i20-yd. hurdle race, each hurdle is 3 ft. 6 in. high and placed lo yd. apart, with the first hurdle 15 yd. distant from the starting point, and the last hur- dle 15 yd. before the finishing line. In the 220-yd. hurdle race 10 hurdles are used; each hurdle is 2 ft. 6 in. high. They are placed 20 yd. apart, with the first hurdle 20 yd. distant from the starting mark, and the last hurdle 20 yd. before the finish- ing line.

In the 440-yd. hurdle race 10 hurdles are used, each hurdle being 3 ft. in height. The first hurdle is placed 40 yd. from the scratch mark, the remaining hurdles are placed 40 yd. apart, and the distance from the last hurdle to the finishing line is 40 yd.

In the iio-meter hurdle race there are 10 hurdles, each hurdle 1.06 meters (3 ft. 6 in.) high. The distance from the scratch mark to the first hurdle is 13.72 meters (15 yd.): the remaining hurdles are placed 9.14 meters (10 yd.) apart, and the distance from the last hurdle to the winning post is 14.02 meters (46 ft.).

In the 400-meter hurdle race, there are 10 flights of hurdles, each hurdle being 3 ft. in height. The first hurdle is placed 45 meters (49.213 yd.) from the scratch mark, the remaining hurdles are placed 35 meters (38,277 yd.) apart, and the distance from the last hurdle to the winning post is 40 meters (43-745 yd.).

In hurdle races of other distances, and with different numbers of hurdles, the hurdles should be placed at equal intervals, with the same distance between the first hurdle and the starting point and the last hurdle and the finishing line as between separate hurdles.

Since hurdling is merely modified sprint- ing, the rules of sprinting apply to it, except

��those distinctive features, "taking the hurdle" (leaping over) and striding.

The crouch start is the one used. The preliminary run to the first hurdle must be accurately made as in the high jump, so that there is no difficulty in making the leap. A take-off line should be marked on the track about 8 ft. in front of the first hurdle which the jumping foot must meet. Another mark should be made six or eight strides from the take-off line, which must also be stepped upon by the jumping foot. Some hurdlers find it necessary to start from the mark with the unusual leg for- ward so as to bring the stride out right.

In leaping over the hurdles always spring from the same foot. Bring the front foot well up forward, with the knee bent some- what toward the chest but not turned outward. Bend the trunk forward upon the forward thigh. After the leap turn and bend the jumping leg horizontally out- ward and bring it forward steadily without a jerk, so as to be ready to stride when the forward foot strikes the ground. The arms are spread. Do not soar high, but get to the ground as quickly as possible. Do not twist the trunk, but keep faced to the front.

In the i20-yd. hurdles (called the high hurdles) tall men make the best records, since they can best make the three strides between hurdles. In the 220-yd. hurdles tall men take seven strides between hurdles and short ones nine. In longer distances there is no standard.

Rules

In making a record it is necessary for the competitor to jump over every hurdle in its proper position, and no record is allowed unless all the hurdles remain standing after the competitor clears them. A competitor knocking down three or more hurdles in a race, or any portion of a hurdle, is disquali- fied. In any championship race up to and including 300 yd., each competitor must have separate hurdles and a separate course marked out and measured independently, whether races are run straightaway or with turns.

Training Hints

Before starting regular hurdle practice, become hardened by several weeks of preliminary sprinting, jumping, and dis- tance jogging as in training for sprinting. The daily schedule of practice work should be about as follows:

Monday — Take three starts. Set up two hur- dles at proper distances and "take them"

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