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Page:Provincial geographies of India (Volume 1).djvu/187

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PERIOD, 500 B.C.-1ooo A.D.

at least of the Indus valley submitted to the youthful conqueror. He and his successors in Sindh were tolerant rulers. No attempt was made to occupy the Central Panjab, and when the Turkish Sultan, Sabaktagin, made his first raid into India in 986-7 a.d., his opponent was a powerful raja named Jaipal, who ruled over a wide territory extending from the Hakra to the frontier hills on the north-west. His capital was at Bhatinda. Just about the time when the rulers of Ghazni were laying the train which ended at Delhi and made it the seat of a great Muhammadan Empire, that town was being founded in 993-4 a.d. by the Tun war Rajputs, who then held sway in that neighbourhood.