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68 LoN L. Swift as owners, but those who rent and do not accumulate money for themselves or secure good returns for their lessors are hardly worthy of the responsibility which they hold. Yet we must not lose sight of the fact that tenancy, in a large and ever increasing proportion, is not a desirable condition of tenure. The farmer who owns his farm is the most satisfied, stable, independent and among the best citizens of our com- monwealth. Prevailing opinion indicates that the majority of tenants are from the eastern statesĀ ; mainly Missouri, Iowa, Illinois, Kan- sas, Nebraska and other states of the Middle West. The coast counties report a large number of foreigners, consisting of Scandinavians, Norwegians and Finns, who are attracted to that section by the fishing industry. Swedes, Germans, Irish and other nationalities are also represented on the coast and throughout the State. Not a very large per cent of tenants are natives of Oregon. Landowners say that both easterners and foreigners are as good and conscientious farmers as Ore- gonians who rent, and the fact that renters come largely from outside the State only indicates that those who rent are, for the most part, newcomers. As a large and ever increasing percentage of tenant farming is not desirable for our country, the question of placing a check on this tendency deserves the earnest consideration of every citizen who desides to better the welfare of society and of the nation. In answer to the question of how to check the ever increasing proportion of tenant farming, the landowners were generally agreed that large tracts of land should be cut up into smaller farms and farming made more intensive. They say that ownership on small tracts produces more efficient and economical results and more independent, progressive and sat- isfied citizens than tenancy on large tracts. Many claim this might be brought about by longer terms of leasing, but more certainly, by allowing the farmer an agreement whereby he may pay for the farm instead of paying rent by selling at a

reasonable price on moderate interest. In this way, he is in----