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Robert the Bruce and the struggle for Scottish independence - Sir Humphrey de Bohun.png Robert the Bruce and the struggle for Scottish independence - Sir Philip de Moubray.png
Sir Humphrey de Bohun. Sir Philip de Moubray.


CHAPTER X.

INVASION OF ENGLAND AND IRELAND BY THE SCOTS.

A.D. 1314-1317.

SIR PHILIP DE MOUBRAY delivered up his command of Stirling Castle, according to stipulation, and entered the service of the King of Scots.

The English historian, Walsingham, will not be suspected of partiality for the victors of Bannockburn; the greater weight therefore is carried by his testimony to the merciful treatment of the prisoners by King Robert, who thereby won the affection of many who had fought against him. According to the custom of war, a proportion of the prisoners taken in a general action were credited to the commander-in-chief, to whom their ransom should be payable. Among those thus allotted to the King's share were his relative, Sir Marmaduke de Twenge, and his old friend, Sir Ralph de Monthermer, both of whom he released unconditionally. Sir Marma-

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