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8
V, 1, 16.
mahâvagga

One, and took his seat on one side. And when he was thus seated, the Blessed One addressed the venerable Sona, and said : 'Is it not true, Sona, that in your mind, when you had gone apart and were plunged in meditation, there sprung up this thought : "Though I have become (&c., as in J 13, down to the end)?"'

'Even so, Lord!'

'Now what think you, Sona, — you were skilled, were you not, when you formerly lived in the world, in the music of the lute ?'

'That was so, Lord ! '

'Now what think you, Sona, — when the strings of your lute ^ were too miich stretched, had your lute then any sound, was it in a fit state to be played upon ? *

'Not so, Lord!'

'Now what think you, Sona, — when the strings of your lute were too loose, had your lute then any sound[1], was it in a fit state to be played upon ?'

'Not so, Lord!'

'Now what think you, Sona, — when the strings of your lute were neither too much stretched nor too loose, but fixed in even proportion, had your lute sound then, was it then in a fit state to be played upon?'

'Yes, Lord!'

'And just so, Sona, does too eager a determination conduce to self-righteousness, and too weak a deter-

nâ. On the construction of the ancient Indian lute, see Milinda Pawha (p. 53, ed. Trenckner), where all the various parts are mentioned. Compare also the Guttila Gataka (No. 243, ed. Fausbcll).


  1. There is a misprint here in the text, {{sp|savaratî} for saravatî.