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148 SAMUEL JOHNSON

corrosion of less visible evils, which canker enjoyment, and undermine security. The visit of an invader is necessarily rare, but domestic animosities allow no cessation.

��WE were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Cale- donian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible, if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish, if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses; whatever makes the past, the dis- tant, or the future predominate over the pre- sent, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us in- different and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the ruins of lona.

��THE cemetery of the nunnery was, till very lately, regarded with such reverence, that

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